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C++ As First Language


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#61 shadowstep00   Members   -  Reputation: 478

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 02:14 PM

Guys like I said earlier I have already started learning C# with be book I mentioned above... there's no point discussing this thread further..... except IF you have a better book to recommend me ...... But if you really want to continue discuss this thread by any means do it .

Failure is not an option...


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#62 Shikamaru   Members   -  Reputation: 129

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 02:51 PM

So my final question is.. Is really C++ that hard for a begginer? is it impossible to learn C++ as first language? or it just requires some more dedication than other languages? or maybe i just havent got to the difficult things yet....


I dont think so but I also have a decent background in C# right now im re learning the syntax of C++ i have not yet used the language for anything demanding I'm reading the boox beginning C++ game programming... just keep moving forward, good luck

#63 meliegreeFPM   Members   -  Reputation: 96

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 12:30 AM

Hmm... we talking about language or about building machines? If i want to learn Japanese i must start from English? Also i say - that is my opionion, so why to start holy war about that?

Programming language is something little different than calculus, algebra etc. beacuse you can start learning whatever language you want, with no need of knowing rest of it. It depend on you, how fast you will learn this. That's why is better to learn hard language first, when you don't know hard hard it is.

#64 shadowstep00   Members   -  Reputation: 478

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 01:11 AM

Even though I don't know much about programming cause I am still begginer I think I get your point.

So here is my example. Let's say that we have two programming languages.

The A language in order to learn it has 2+4+54-34+3= ???
While B is 4+5+2-2= ????

If you learn A you will have no problem learning B cause its more easy....

But if you try to learn A and get the wrong result you may end up confuced and start all over again.

Meaning that it's safer and more natural to go from easy to hard. That's my thought I think it's accurate enough for everyone to understand my point.

Failure is not an option...


#65 luki   Members   -  Reputation: 101

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 10:42 AM

Recently i started to learn programming myself. As far as i understand it, you need to learn a programming language and how to program. Just by knowing a programming language doesn't mean that you can write good programs. Without having some programming experience i think its not a good way to start with C++. Start with something more simple like python or java. There are some really good videos on youtube that you can watch. For example you can find the StanfordUniversity channel on youtube and there is a course called Programming Methodology. There are 28 videos 50min long, recorded directly from the Stanford University. It is a course for students that don't need to have any prior experience in programming and they use java as their first language. You can download the books and everything you need from their homepage. There are also good videos from the MIT university and i think they start with python. When you master one or both of them you can jump to something else.

#66 BinaryPhysics   Members   -  Reputation: 294

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 01:19 PM

If you *really* want to learn C++ as your first language, try to avoid the C parts of it as long as possible.


Just to jump in (imagine that! Joining a discussion on a forum; madness) but this is a terrible, terrible idea. Learning C either alongside or before or after is a great idea. C++ articles and books tend focus a lot on treating everything as a class. Everything everywhere (at least in my experience).

Stuff that uses C tends to have a tighter focus on small programs and I learnt a lot about memory through it.

It's just important to note that C++ doesn't simply extend C.

As far as i understand it, you need to learn a programming language and how to program.


This is also a very, very good point. Don't forget to study outside the language you're learning.

Edited by BinaryPhysics, 17 July 2012 - 01:23 PM.


#67 phantom   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6906

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 01:37 PM

Just to jump in (imagine that! Joining a discussion on a forum; madness) but this is a terrible, terrible idea. Learning C either alongside or before or after is a great idea. C++ articles and books tend focus a lot on treating everything as a class. Everything everywhere (at least in my experience).


No.
C and C++ are different languages.
Idiomatic Modern C++ looks nothing like C.

By trying to learn both C++ and C you are just making life hard for yourself. Learn one language or the other but trying to learn both at the same time when its your first language is dumb.

To be honest learning C++ as a first language is dumb but that doesn't stop many many people making that mistake...

#68 boogyman19946   Members   -  Reputation: 1042

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 05:36 PM

EDIT: Meh, I'm not gonna beat a dead horse :D

Edited by boogyman19946, 17 July 2012 - 05:38 PM.

"If highly skilled generalists are rare, though, then highly skilled innovators are priceless." - ApochPiQ

My personal links :)
- Khan Academy - For all your math needs
- Java API Documentation - For all your Java info needs :D
- C++ Standard Library Reference - For some of your C++ needs ^.^

#69 brickets   Members   -  Reputation: 111

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 07:06 PM

I don't believe learning any language is a bad idea. Hard or not c++ has some of the best support and documentation to help you out. Provided you know how to distinguish good and bad advice. I remembered whatever c++ knowledge I had helped me make my java courses stupid easy lol

Just be persistent and dedicated to whatever you choose

#70 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5263

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Posted 17 July 2012 - 07:37 PM

I don't believe learning any language is a bad idea.


Generally true.

Now, learning certain languages *FIRST*, that is a much different comment.

#71 FireInDark   Members   -  Reputation: 148

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 12:26 AM

I don't think it is so hard to learn C++ programming..
But it is sure that you should learn more about Computer before C++ programming .
You should know how the memory and cpu work together and understand what the memory address really means ....this is the key to understand pointers in C++ (notice the function pointers)

Then any trouble else with C++ programming?

If any it'll be how to design a project...

#72 phantom   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6906

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 03:15 AM

Provided you know how to distinguish good and bad advice.


And as a first language there in lies the crux of the matter.

As a beginner in programming you are, by definition, not good enough to tell the difference between good and bad advice. You simply don't have the knowledge to back it up and when it comes to a language like C++ outside of a few books the advice lurking on random internet sites tends towards 'bad'.

#73 Fredericvo   Members   -  Reputation: 281

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Posted 18 July 2012 - 06:27 AM

I don't think it is so hard to learn C++ programming..
But it is sure that you should learn more about Computer before C++ programming .
You should know how the memory and cpu work together and understand what the memory address really means ....this is the key to understand pointers in C++ (notice the function pointers)

Then any trouble else with C++ programming?

If any it'll be how to design a project...

That's why I think assembler could actually be an excellent first language. After all many old programmers had nothing else and so it was their first language. I myself, though am moderately old, knew assembler before C and C++ and whenever I wasn't sure what a feature did I'd often peek at the assembler output to get it.




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