Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Interested in a FREE copy of HTML5 game maker Construct 2?

We'll be giving away three Personal Edition licences in next Tuesday's GDNet Direct email newsletter!

Sign up from the right-hand sidebar on our homepage and read Tuesday's newsletter for details!


Game maker good for 3d games?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
5 replies to this topic

#1 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 13 July 2012 - 02:21 PM

I know it has sometime "recently" got 3d support you can turn on 3d in that game.
But im still not sure how good is game maker really, i been thinking recently about switching to unity?

in comparisoons between game maker and unity it seems game maker doesnt have any advantage?
game maker you still have to create most things in code anyway.. its not so much drag and drop as they say it will be.
only advantage I guess with unity is that its only 40 dollar you have to spend to be able to use dll in the game but unity free version has entire .net library..

can someone try to defend game maker and saying its advantages?

Sponsor:

#2 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6166

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 13 July 2012 - 03:27 PM

Go here: www.unity3d.com
download the free version and give it a spin.

Pick the one that works best for your current project. (Don't worry about future projects), the skills transfer between tools and different projects have different requirements. (so you shouldn't get too attached to a single tool)
Other engines worth looking at once you know how to program(Allthough by that time there will probably be other good and affordable options to choose from) would be UDK and CryEngine 3 (Both will make some things easier and some things harder, both are free for non commercial use and have a royalty based license option if you don't want to spend too much money up front (Royalty based licenses can become very expensive though)

Edited by SimonForsman, 13 July 2012 - 03:45 PM.

I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#3 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 July 2012 - 07:30 AM

I guess with unity is that its only 40 dollar

Completely wrong. Its got a free trial version, a paid for version costing $1500, android support as $400. iOS is also $400

#4 glhf   Banned   -  Reputation: -585

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:22 AM


I guess with unity is that its only 40 dollar

Completely wrong. Its got a free trial version, a paid for version costing $1500, android support as $400. iOS is also $400


lol yep.. i typed wrong :D meant game maker hehe

#5 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6166

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 July 2012 - 11:00 AM


I guess with unity is that its only 40 dollar

Completely wrong. Its got a free trial version, a paid for version costing $1500, android support as $400. iOS is also $400


the $400 for iOS / Android support is for the free version aswell, if you want iOS or/and Android support for Pro then its $1500 each for those aswell. (You're not allowed to use the free version if you've had more than $100k in turnover last year)
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#6 laztrezort   Members   -  Reputation: 968

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 14 July 2012 - 01:11 PM

can someone try to defend game maker and saying its advantages?


Note: it's been some years since I've played with GM, so grain of salt and all that...

I think the main advantage game maker has (compared to Unity) is simplicity. It has a more limited domain. Things are quick and easy if you are producing a game that fits snugly within that domain, or if you are a beginner and want to learn the higher level fundamentals of game development. But once you start to get near the boundaries of that domain (and it did not take me long to reach them), things quickly get difficult or impossible.

Unity3D has a much larger domain, is much more capable, but on the flip side has a higher learning curve. There is just so much more there.

I agree with Simon that the best way to decide is to just mess around with Unity. Unity has some great tutorials on their site, go through one of those and see what you think.




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS