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direct3d book?


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#1 xucaen   Members   -  Reputation: 141

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 01:55 PM

I have a game design and I want to write it in direct3d. I see there are many books out there on direct3d. But what I want is a book that will walk me through a complete game (or game engine) in direct 3d. I am an experienced programmer so I do not need any beginner programming books, which seem to be most prevalent. Can anyone recommend such a book?

Thanks,

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#2 xucaen   Members   -  Reputation: 141

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 05:12 PM

These are the best books that I could find, still not sure if they will walk me through a project (I have not purchased them). I am listing them here in case anyone wants to share opinions about these books or make recommendations based on these books. All 4 are available on Amazon. Thanks for looking.

Beginning DirectX 11 Game Programming
by Allen Sherrod (Paperback)

Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11
by Frank Luna (Paperback)

Game Coding Complete, Fourth Edition
by Mike McShaffry (Paperback)

Game Engine Architecture
by Jason Gregory (Hardcover)

#3 Inukai   Members   -  Reputation: 1297

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 03:59 AM

Game Coding Complete, Fourth Edition
by Mike McShaffry (Paperback)


I don't recommend you this book, even though it is a great book and gives you information how most AAA-Games are created it contains like no information about direct 3d
and is not suitable for a beginner. It uses directx for the examples, but it doesn't explain the lines.

Beginning DirectX 11 Game Programming
by Allen Sherrod (Paperback)


I got this book as well. It is a really nice book. The author explains nearly each single line of code in the examples at the end of each chapter.
You won't be able to create a complete 3d with this book alone, but you should be able to create small 2d games after reading this book.
After this you should look up how to create terrain, animations, and so to create 3d-games.

#4 dimitri.adamou   Members   -  Reputation: 329

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 01:43 AM

Hey there, I purchased a copy of

Game Coding, Complete Fourth Edition

While I do not recommend it for use of walking you through with a project (It comes with a fully furnished app to - the coding style takes a bit, its done in Template/Event Programming style - not to be confused with actual Templates), it has decent information on programming styles, hints & tips, not so helpful with the actual doing it - I think the incentive of the book is, here is information now figure it out for yourself

I have an outdated book 'Programming Role Playing Games with DirectX' which is based on DirectX 8.1 (where as I'm trying to do DirectX 9 - nose in documentation forever), however I find that combining from both books has been helping - albeit slowly. I have to work out what I've done wrong, which is possibly the best learning experience I can imagine.

After this one I am looking at 'Game Programming in DirectX9:A Shader Approach by Frank Luna', but I'll worry about it when I get there.

Also, I have another book which helped me get onto speed with C++ 'Professional C++, by Marc Gregoire, Nicholas A. Solter, Scott J. Klepter' - it will teach you how to get around in the STL (and extend it - including algorithms), object orientation, C++11 features (and the non C++11 alternatives), operator overloading (including conversion, deferencing), templates, memory management, multithreading, and various design patterns - WHOOSH... it has alot more, but no point me listing them Posted Image Its an overall amazing book for begginers-intermediates. Its doesnt just teach you how to C++, it teachs you how to program (in c++) - that was a bit of an off topic book though, I admit.

Edited by dimitri.adamou, 16 July 2012 - 03:02 AM.





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