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Cryptography in gamedev


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#1 lorem   Members   -  Reputation: 731

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 04:50 PM

I've been studying cryptography lately and I wanted to know how big of an impact it has in game development and creative ways I could use it.

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#2 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9966

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 06:08 PM

Probably zero impact, considering all the cryptography you'll ever need has already been implemented securely in many libraries (openssl, bouncycastle, etc...) and you almost never (and should never) implement it yourself. But learning about cryptography certainly is worth it (but until you actually know what you're doing you shouldn't use it in your commercial projects).

Furthermore cryptography in general is not a very useful tool when it comes to preventing cheating etc... Cryptography solves these problems:
- confidentiality (controlling who can read what you wrote)
- integrity (making sure a given message arrives intact to some destination)
- authenticity (knowing who produced/sent data)

In general these are not the problems you want to solve when making games.

Edited by Bacterius, 15 July 2012 - 06:12 PM.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#3 lorem   Members   -  Reputation: 731

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 08:32 PM

Thank you for the advice, I already know it is bad to implement your security instead of using the tride and true well tested ones. I was mostly looking at it from a game play perspective rather then securing commercial products.

#4 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9966

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:02 PM

Cryptography in gameplay? You mean as in crypto minigames or something? Can you give an example?

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#5 lorem   Members   -  Reputation: 731

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:23 PM

puzzle mechanics.

#6 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9966

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Posted 15 July 2012 - 09:32 PM

puzzle mechanics.

Then sure I guess, but it has to be kept simple (cryptography understandable by average human beings, e.g. back to caesar's code or vigenere level stuff). Perhaps this should be moved to Game Design if it is going to be about how to integrate cryptographic concepts into game mechanics as puzzles or problem solving etc.. you will get more responses I think.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis





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