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Animation techniques for a vector-styled graphics?


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#1 Inness   Members   -  Reputation: 114

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 01:35 AM

Hello,

I'm relatively new to animation and really need someone’s advice. So my task is to make dozens of animations for a game. It will be some kind of magicians, I think vector-styled (like this one - http://ru.depositphotos.com/4634394/stock-illustration-Magician.html)
My question is what graphics software I should better use to draw and animate them? It is not necessarily should be vector-like graphics (it can be even 3d-like). The problem is that many of my characters will have cloaks, capes and other clothing on them that is not easy to animate. Should I draw every single frame or what is the most rational way (so I can cope with the task)?
I think the style of the game will be most likely determined by what is technically easier.

Thanks for any advice! (and sorry for my English:)

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#2 hustlerinc   Members   -  Reputation: 169

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 07:30 AM

Anything 2D will be predrawn frames. For example you can have animation for "falling" where his hands reach for the air, and the cloak is flapping over his head, this could consist of 3-4 frames, that you play in such an order that it makes it animate.

#3 sunandshadow   Moderators   -  Reputation: 4981

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 04:34 PM

The most labor-saving part of vector graphics is probably that you can easily copy one frame then edit the pieces that need to move to get the next frame - for example if you have a character walking to the side, you can make the leg two or three separate pieces and use the rotate command on each one to pivot animate it. But, some systems allow bone animation for vector art, that's a totally different technique and I haven't worked with a graphics program that does that, so I don't know whether it's easier or not.

One tip I have, that I learned the hard way - determine what sprite side you want, then draw a box (transparent but visible border) 8 or 12 pix bigger both height and length wise. This is your frame orientation box. You use it to export all your frames at a consistent size, and just trim the box part off to get your desired size. You can develop frames over top of each other like a lightbox or flipbook, and use the snap feature to line the orientation boxes (copy it for each frame) back up again if you have to separate them.

Phone game idea available free to someone who will develop it (Alphadoku game - the only existing phone game of this type is both for windows phone only and awful. PM for details.)


I want to help design a "sandpark" MMO. Optional interactive story with quests and deeply characterized NPCs, plus sandbox elements like player-craftable housing and lots of other crafting. If you are starting a design of this type, please PM me. I also love pet-breeding games.





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