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How to design the levels in a platform game?


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#1 ReyLitch   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:13 AM

Hi,

I am developing a 3D platformer game like Metroid Fusion with XNA. I have many classes for different elements as models, game screens, postprocessing and so on. Now I want to start designing the levels but I think that the levels needed in a platformer game are not as conventional (by conventional I say something like this http://desmond.image...jpg&res=landing).

I am very lost and not know where to start and how to structure it.

Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Sorry I forget to add the link in "this".

Edited by ReyLitch, 06 August 2012 - 08:13 AM.


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#2 ReyLitch   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 02:09 PM

Hi again,

I have been researching during this days and I found many alternatives. As I indicated above, I want to make a platformer game similar to Metroid Fusion in a 3D world but with a 2D camera movement:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xroqahxuGI

The alternative that I think best suits what I want to do is use a 2D tile engine but changing the tiles for 3D models, and then apply this concepts (http://www.gamedev.n...atformers-r2936). Does anyone know other alternative that better suits what I want to do?. If the alternative that I have described before is good, does anyone know where I can found a tutorial to show me where to start?

Thanks in advance.

Edited by ReyLitch, 08 August 2012 - 02:46 AM.


#3 Lightness1024   Members   -  Reputation: 737

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

for me, clearly all the good games that I played were entertaining because the design was creating an ambience.
this ambience must be coherent with the game environment and story. And should try to be artistically made the best looking possible with the given technology. (the chosen game engine)
Sound must not be taken lightly, it has 30% value for immersion and HAS to be coherent with the graphic design and aimed ambience. If sound fails, everything fails.
(it includes music of course, or lack of such)

#4 ReyLitch   Members   -  Reputation: 144

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 01:29 AM

for me, clearly all the good games that I played were entertaining because the design was creating an ambience.
this ambience must be coherent with the game environment and story. And should try to be artistically made the best looking possible with the given technology. (the chosen game engine)
Sound must not be taken lightly, it has 30% value for immersion and HAS to be coherent with the graphic design and aimed ambience. If sound fails, everything fails.
(it includes music of course, or lack of such)


Thanks for the advice but I refers to how to implement levels (using tiles in 3D space, isometric, etc.)

#5 Lightness1024   Members   -  Reputation: 737

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Posted 09 August 2012 - 06:26 AM

oh sorry. well in that case, i don't see why it should not be conventional. the general game structure is the same than any game. (engine, gui, game loop, events etc.)
and then inside the representation of the levels themselves it has to be suited to platforms. so 2D spatial structures for partitionning, maybe streaming of data if levels are gigantics.. the classes holds various kind of objects that can be found in the game. its all very conventional really.
Also, it is not necessary to snap everything on a tile based grid. In the end, everything has to be managed by pixel anyway, so why bother with snapping. snapping can help the level artist to make beautiful regular blocks if he wants but that can be a feature of the editor and doesn't have to be hard coded into object positions.

you will surely want a bit of a Z structure in any cases, for that you can support layers. background, middle background, foreground, most foreground. (for instance).
you will need to be able to flag objects as collisionable or not (e.g. a plant in the foreground can hide the hero but not prevent him from going on behind, so that within the same layer, some objects can still act as 'pure decorative').

for inspiration on the engine, there is a nice amateur project:





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