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DirectX or Engine to get a job?


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#1 riverreal   Members   -  Reputation: 616

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 06:55 PM

If I want to become a game programmer in a company... What should I learn?
An API like DirectX 11, OpenGL 3.x, 4.x, ES 2.0?
Or programming in a specific engine, for example C# with unity or UnrealScript with UDK?

I am a intermediary C++ programmer with some experience in SDL. And also, I used Python and Pygame to make simple games.

I'm trying to learn Direct3D 11 but I'm not sure if it's necessary to get a job as a graphics programmer.

At the moment, I want to be a graphics programmer, or an AI programmer. But of course I have in mind to begin from the lowest positions and then growing up.

Sponsor:

#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10062

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 07:01 PM

What kind of games do you want to work in? That is to say, what platform(s) and genre(s)? Also, do you have a degree, and if so, in what? And have you got a resume (have you held down any paying jobs), and what country do you live in?

We need the context in order to give you the best answer for you and your particular situation.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 riverreal   Members   -  Reputation: 616

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 07:41 PM

What kind of games do you want to work in? That is to say, what platform(s) and genre(s)?

I don't have any restrictions about it. But I prefer non casual games. And also I prefer PC and console development rather iOS/Adroid development.

Also, do you have a degree, and if so, in what?

I have 16, so I'm trying to learn a lot of things before the college. I want a computer science bechelor's degree.

And have you got a resume (have you held down any paying jobs)

No, but I'm trying to make a portfolio with simple but full games.

what country do you live in?

I live in Colombia (Sourth America). I was born in Japan. I have two nationalities, Colombian, and Japanese.
I also know Spanish, and Japanese.

We need the context in order to give you the best answer for you and your particular situation.

Yes, Thank you.
I know you are very helpful.
I will wait your recommendations.

#4 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30926

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Posted 06 August 2012 - 09:56 PM

An API like DirectX 11, OpenGL 3.x, 4.x, ES 2.0?
Or programming in a specific engine, for example C# with unity or UnrealScript with UDK?

Graphics-engine programmers use D3D/GL/etc professionally. Game programmers use engines professionally.

It's helpful to be familiar with many different APIs, and to be familiar with many different engines. So you should learn both in the long run - you've got plenty of time Posted Image

However, if you were presenting a portfolio piece for a specific job, then a D3D-based renderer would be a good piece if applying for an engine-programmer job, and a high-level Engine-based game would be a good piece if applying for a gameplay-programmer job.
N.B. if applying for the other job with the other portfolio piece (D3D-usage for gameplay-programmer, or engine-usage for engine-programmer), then that will still be useful!

In terms of ease-of-learning, I would start off using existing existing engines, and try to learn the lower-level APIs later on, once you've accumulated more practice. The opposite approach is also possible though -- so start off with whichever one is more comfortable for you to learn at your current skill level.

Edited by Hodgman, 06 August 2012 - 10:01 PM.


#5 riverreal   Members   -  Reputation: 616

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Posted 07 August 2012 - 08:12 AM


An API like DirectX 11, OpenGL 3.x, 4.x, ES 2.0?
Or programming in a specific engine, for example C# with unity or UnrealScript with UDK?

Graphics-engine programmers use D3D/GL/etc professionally. Game programmers use engines professionally.

It's helpful to be familiar with many different APIs, and to be familiar with many different engines. So you should learn both in the long run - you've got plenty of time Posted Image

However, if you were presenting a portfolio piece for a specific job, then a D3D-based renderer would be a good piece if applying for an engine-programmer job, and a high-level Engine-based game would be a good piece if applying for a gameplay-programmer job.
N.B. if applying for the other job with the other portfolio piece (D3D-usage for gameplay-programmer, or engine-usage for engine-programmer), then that will still be useful!

In terms of ease-of-learning, I would start off using existing existing engines, and try to learn the lower-level APIs later on, once you've accumulated more practice. The opposite approach is also possible though -- so start off with whichever one is more comfortable for you to learn at your current skill level.


Thank you very much!

I will learn both, low-level APIs and engine. And then I will know which is better for me.

Or, do you have any recommendations/experiences in these jobs?




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