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TXAA details


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#1 wngabh11   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 11:02 PM

does anyone know about details of TXAA anti-aliasing or have any articles or papers of it? I've been trying to look for them, but just find some introductions and advertisement.

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#2 Ripiz   Members   -  Reputation: 529

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 11:43 PM

http://www.inquisitr.com/297606/the-secret-world-is-the-worlds-first-game-to-feature-txaa/

It seems to be hardware feature that can be enabled through nVidia Control Panel, not just shader code.

#3 Krohm   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3895

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 11:50 PM

TXAA approaches the quality of other high end, professional anti-aliasing algorithms, though the higher quality filtering used by TXAA does result in a softer image compared to the lower quality filtering of traditional MSAA

What does that mean? Is "softer" good or bad? Or just different. I need to see hi-quality pictures. I ran google and found a flat out scary bench.

#4 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 40041

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 11:50 PM

AFAIK, Timothy Lottes hasn't published much info on TLAA yet -- he'll probably do so soon, seeing that the test-case (The Secret World) just came out, and it's in the new nVidia drivers. It's actually still a WIP R&D project.

[edit]Apparently you can ask to gain access to it, but nVidia is controlling it's use by only distributing a closed-source library that only works with specific nVidia drivers... :(

Get library by emailing tlottes (me) at nvidia. Currently no OpenGL support (only DX11). Even though I written GL support into the library already, the driver work won't get scheduled until it becomes higher priority than all the other GL work going on. I'm assuming once the Windows GL driver gets support, this means Linux gets support too.

[/edit]

It seems to be hardware feature that can be enabled through nVidia Control Panel, not just shader code.

No, lots of people think the same thing about MLAA, FXAA, etc... because nVidia/ATI add them as hacky options in their control panels -- all these these options do is enable driver hacks that insert an extra post-processing step into existing games. This is usually a bad idea, and doesn't give as good results as when the game developer integrates MLAA/FXAA/TLAA/etc themselves (as they can perform it in the most optimal way, at the most correct point in their pipeline).

TXAA approaches the quality of other high end, professional anti-aliasing algorithms, though the higher quality filtering used by TXAA does result in a softer image compared to the lower quality filtering of traditional MSAA

What does that mean? Is "softer" good or bad? Or just different. I need to see hi-quality pictures. I ran google and found a flat out scary bench.

TXAA is designed to produce as soft an image as possibly, which might make things too blurry in some cases; the point it to get a movie-like look instead of a realtime-CGI look. The 'T' means it's a temporal filter, which means it's designed to fix the case where you notice a jagged edge 'crawl' along an edges as the camera slowly moves -- it does this by greatly smoothing out almost-horizontal/vertical lines.
It's also a resizing filter, so you can render at a low, pixelated resolution, then upscale to full HD without introducing 'jaggies' (or render at higher resolution and downsample for extreme quality).
http://timothylottes...and-resize.html
http://timothylottes...out-stills.html
http://timothylottes...-txaa-info.html
http://timothylottes...479-driver.html
http://timothylottes...es-vs-film.html
[edit] Here's good video of the reduction in pixel-crawl: http://www.geforce.c...ret-world-txaa/

Edited by Hodgman, 20 August 2012 - 06:19 AM.


#5 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 14017

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 01:59 AM

Ignoring the temporal stuff, the core idea behind MSAA seems to be using something other than a 1-pixel-wide box filter when performing MSAA resolve. This isn't exactly new...in offline CG and film using wide, complex filters is par for the course. And even in games you had the old "Quincunx AA" from GeForce 6/7/PS3 and more recently the wide tent/narrow tent/edge detect stuff from ATI/AMD. So far those approaches haven't fared well in the high-end PC world, since those gamers are used to ultra-sharp images viewed at very close range. But I think that it could pan out better for consoles or PC's attached to a TV, where you have some distance between the viewer and the display and thus it would make more sense to trade off some detail for a more stable image.

If you're interested in this stuff I would suggest digging up some reading material on image processing and filtering. There's also some info about the filtering modes in RenderMan on Pixar's website.

Edited by MJP, 20 August 2012 - 02:00 AM.


#6 wngabh11   Members   -  Reputation: 128

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:26 AM

AFAIK, Timothy Lottes hasn't published much info on TLAA yet -- he'll probably do so soon, seeing that the test-case (The Secret World) just came out, and it's in the new nVidia drivers. It's actually still a WIP R&D project.

if that is the result, it is no doubt the details cannot be found recently. Well, I just wait for them.

If you're interested in this stuff I would suggest digging up some reading material on image processing and filtering. There's also some info about the filtering modes in RenderMan on Pixar's website.

among the approaches of anti-aliasing, post-processing method is an important way all the time. Recently, i am just curious about why it is the technique can only be used on the latest hardware, in other words, what kinds of module are added in it, and whether it can be implemented by relatively old versions of hardware and SDKs.

#7 B_old   Members   -  Reputation: 673

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 05:39 AM

I'm curious how TXAA plugs into the rest of the pipeline. For instance in case of deferred shading: Would you have a multi-sampled g-buffer and accumulate the lighting into another multi-sampled target before doing the TXAA resolve? Does it need another pass for edge detection and stenceling?

#8 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 14017

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Posted 20 August 2012 - 02:34 PM

I'd be really surprised if they're doing anything that actually required a new hardware feature. So far everything they've described sounds completely doable with any DX11-class GPU.

As for integration, they said that you just render with MSAA, then give it to a special function for performing the resolve. I think it also requires a velocity buffer if you want temporal reprojection, but they never said anything about additional edge detection passes.

#9 B_old   Members   -  Reputation: 673

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:32 AM

As for integration, they said that you just render with MSAA, then give it to a special function for performing the resolve.

Are the deferred passes rendered with MSAA? So I read all samples for a pixel from the multi-sample g-buffer and render to a multi-sample render target? Wouldn't all samples be the same then?

#10 Krohm   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3895

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 01:48 AM

Thank you for the links. The resize feature and speed consideration are very interesting!




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