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a bunch of smaller questions:


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#1 FooBarSteve   Members   -  Reputation: 181

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 11:16 PM

I am currently working on a multiplayer space adventure game, I have some minor questions about the development. Any help is greatly appreciated!

1: Regarding hitboxes, is it possible to completely get rid of them and just have the collision as the actual mesh?. If so, why do they still use hitboxes?

2: How much do no-lag game servers tend to cost?

3: Is it even remotely affordable to use the animation technique the industry uses by hooking cords and cables up to you and you physically do them and it maps it into an animation?

4: How are realistic textures created apart from taking real life photos? I doubt people individually put pixel to pixel. Is there some sort of customizable randomizer that people use?

5: In my game, you will be able to go to multiple planets in real time, meaning no separate cells, dimensions, worlds, etc. How would this be possible? Is there some sort of trick that allows massive amounts of space in one world without any noticeable model changes, or anything else that takes away immersion? I'm thinking something (sort of) like Eve where the entire galaxy is one space. Expect the planets are fully explorable and unique.

Thanks!

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#2 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31781

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 11:24 PM

1) Yes, but hitboxes are an optimisation. Checking for ray collisions against a mesh is called "ray tracing", and it's slow. So most games instead use a lower-detailed mesh to speed it up (the "hitbox" mesh).
2) Depends which location in the world, how much CPU power + RAM your game needs, and how much bandwidth your game needs. A ballpark figure could be anywhere from $100/year to $500/month.
3) Motion capture has traditionally been very expensive, traditionally, you rent time in a mo-cap studio that someone has paid a fortune to build.
You can build your own a low-end mo-cap studio for maybe about $5000 these days, or you can use a kinnect.
N.B. all mo-cap animations are only a starting point -- you still need a skilled animator to turn them into something useful.
4) By an artist. Yes people paint them, by hand -- n.b. a lot of the photorealistic backdrops in movies aren't real and aren't CG; matte painters are still used because artists are pretty good at their job.
You can also use procedural texture generators, but this is not the traditional solution.
5) Most massive-scale games do this via a hierarchy of "cells" -- there doesn't have to be any visual cue that this is the case, the details of handling cell-based positions can be completely hidden.

Edited by Hodgman, 08 September 2012 - 11:30 PM.


#3 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22692

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Posted 08 September 2012 - 11:26 PM

1: Regarding hitboxes, is it possible to completely get rid of them and just have the collision as the actual mesh?. If so, why do they still use hitboxes?

Efficiency. It is much easier and faster to test against a quad than it is to test against many thousand polys in a mesh.

2: How much do no-lag game servers tend to cost?

There is no such thing. All communication takes time. There are many tools available to networked games that will help mask lag, see the Networking forum FAQ.

3: Is it even remotely affordable to use the animation technique the industry uses by hooking cords and cables up to you and you physically do them and it maps it into an animation?

Very few part of the industry use motion capture. Most use traditional animation coupled with IK simulations.

4: How are realistic textures created apart from taking real life photos? I doubt people individually put pixel to pixel. Is there some sort of customizable randomizer that people use?

Real life photos tend to make poor textures. Skilled artists produce textures, and their quality is generally proportional to the money invested.

5: In my game, you will be able to go to multiple planets in real time, meaning no separate cells, dimensions, worlds, etc. How would this be possible? Is there some sort of trick that allows massive amounts of space in one world without any noticeable model changes, or anything else that takes away immersion? I'm thinking something (sort of) like Eve where the entire galaxy is one space. Expect the planets are fully explorable and unique.

There is a tremendous amount of work involved in the technology that makes that kind of game work. Is it possible? Yes. Is it affordable? That depends on how many work-years you care to invest into it. Look at the cost to develop that game, and ask yourself if you have that type of budget.

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.





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