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Creating an adventure game as a final project for college


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#1 kgeorgiadis   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 04:31 PM

Hello all, its my first post here. I'm in a computer engineering and informatics college and next year I will have to do a big final project(supposed to take 6 months usually but I'm fine with it if it takes longer than that).

I was thinking about making something like an adventure game like the many many old SCUMM ones. And just maybe if I finish it it might even sell.(considering the success of Gemini Rue recently I at least have hopes.. maybe it will take more than a year and I'll have to make interesting characters/story/puzzles but still... its a possibility)

I have a couple questions... is it possible to do this in roughly a year(I'll try to find 2-3 people to help with sounds and art)? I found this http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/how-do-i-make-games-a-path-to-game-development-r892

thread and I'll definitely try doing this during this year to prepare so I won't go into it right off the bat.

My more important questions though are... how useful would it be in order to find a job later as a game programmer? On one hand I feel like I will learn plenty of things. On the other I wonder if a lot of them are too outdated and I'd be better off doing something else that would require an equal amount of time.

Last question is once I'm done with school and supposing I finished this product and it's rather decent, how do you go about actually finding a job? Almost everywhere I've looked they all seem to require past 2-3 years of experience in the field or having worked on another released decent game. How can you actually do that if they all won't accept you(at least according to what they say is basic "requirements" to hire you)?

Seeing as those 2-3 first few years are the most crucial ones I'd very much appreciate some guidance.

Thanks for your replies,
Konstantinos

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#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9435

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 04:48 PM

1. is it possible to do this in roughly a year
2. how useful would it be in order to find a job later as a game programmer?
3. On one hand I feel like I will learn plenty of things. On the other I wonder if a lot of them are too outdated and I'd be better off doing something else that would require an equal amount of time.
4. Last question is once I'm done with school and supposing I finished this product and it's rather decent, how do you go about actually finding a job?
5. Almost everywhere I've looked they all seem to require past 2-3 years of experience in the field or having worked on another released decent game. How can you actually do that if they all won't accept you(at least according to what they say is basic "requirements" to hire you)?

1. This question goes outside the topic of this forum. Ask this question in another forum (For Beginners is recommended).
2. Not very useful. School projects do not make a good portfolio. http://www.igda.org/...s-game-may-2012
3. Of course you'll learn lots. But it's silly to worry about those lessons being outdated, and "I don't want to waste my time" is covered in this forum's FAQs.
4. See this forum's FAQs. Back out to the forum's main page, and look at upper right.
5. Those ads are for experienced people. You need to stop reading those ads, and just look for entry-level positions.

[Edits]
2. You definitely should make a game. But your portfolio won't be finished thereby.
3. Do it to learn. Then make more stuff. Don't worry about whether the technology is outdated, and don't worry about wasting your time. Just do it.

Edited by Tom Sloper, 21 September 2012 - 05:43 PM.

-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 kgeorgiadis   Members   -  Reputation: 103

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Posted 22 September 2012 - 01:02 AM

Thanks for the reply! I found the FAQ(didn't see it at first since in forums they are usually a sticky) and it answered a lot of my questions and others I didn't post here.

#4 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 9435

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Posted 22 September 2012 - 12:12 PM

I found the FAQ(didn't see it at first since in forums they are usually a sticky)


That gives me an idea. Thanks.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#5 cardinal   Members   -  Reputation: 823

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Posted 22 September 2012 - 04:48 PM

Tom answered most (if not all) of the questions already, but I felt that I should add:

Most undergraduate projects require approval by a professor (I don't know what your school's rules are), each with their own idea of what is and isn't acceptible. You will likely need to present what you intend to build for your project in order to gain approval. Perhaps it would be best to run ideas by your favourite professors ahead of time. Some professors won't like game projects and some won't mind (they tend to steer students towards projects in their personal areas of interest).

The professor grading my project was reluctant to allow me to build a basic 3D modeling program, but he ended up liking the final product. Your professors might be able to suggest a reasonable scope to target for your project (although you coming up with a detailed schedule with some buffer room will help your do the same).




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