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Preferred development OS (Desktop/Laptop).


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Poll: Most targeted desktop/laptop operating system. (88 member(s) have cast votes)

What desktop/laptop operating systems are most fullfilling for to to develop on?

  1. Microsoft Windows (65 votes [64.36%])

    Percentage of vote: 64.36%

  2. Apple OSX (13 votes [12.87%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.87%

  3. Any Linux (19 votes [18.81%])

    Percentage of vote: 18.81%

  4. I wrote my own OS (4 votes [3.96%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.96%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#41 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9612

Posted 30 September 2012 - 06:44 AM

umm....how often do u buy windows?

Once per machine, if you are doing things the legal way. You are also implicitly buying Windows every time you buy a PC.

I have quite a number of Windows licenses lying around. Boxed set of Windows 3.1, anyone?

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


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#42 Heath   Members   -  Reputation: 344

Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:20 PM


I always fall back on Linux, particularly when I don't want to pay for Windows again.


umm....how often do u buy windows?

My desktop had Vista at first, and I had the choice to buy an upgrade to Windows 7, or to continue with Vista. I installed Ubuntu instead.

#43 SuperVGA   Members   -  Reputation: 1118

Posted 30 September 2012 - 12:50 PM


It's not just that the header file is the interface contact, it's also that it serves as an overview of the class for the programmer.

The purpose of a header file is to convey the necessary information (and only the necessary information) to the clients of a class. Any time that private/protected functions or data become visible to clients, it becomes impossible to cleanly modify the implementation without impacting those clients.

No. Not necessarily. (In ObjC perhaps, and to each, theirs.) -They're originally meant just to hold the declarations to be shared between source files using those declarations.
When a declaration is moved from a header file into an implementation file, this purpose is ignored.
I understand that a language can use headers as a description of the class interface, and that's cool with me, I just personally don't like that,
as I like using headers as an overview of the class (or any other code module with a header)

In C++, changing the definition of a private function/data member in the header file will not only force the recompilation of every dependent source file, but if part of a shared library it will break binary compatibility as well (forcing all users of the library to recompile/relink their code). This is one of the key flaws in the C++ compilation model, which makes maintaining large-scale C++ software a nightmare, and gives rise to such workarounds as the PIMPL idiom (which just recreates the Objective-C feature you are complaining about).

Yes, sure. -I understand that. I like avoiding that sort of stuff, and I don't advocate the use of dynamic linked libraries, if that's what you mean by breaking the binary compatibility.
But I don't mind compiling more when we're talking large scale projects, and I would still prefer descriptive headers to less recompilation.
I really think you're overstating a little, by saying it's a nightmare. If you're maintaining a large scale piece of software, there are usually plenty of nightmares even without the
language-specific stuff.

Obj c does in no way imply developer comfort. -And it certainly doesn't blow c++ out of the water IMO...

To my mind, Objective-C is one of the most interesting object-oriented programming languages in current use. Not only have they managed to implement a highly-performant modula3-style dynamic object/messaging system, but they have managed to tie it into C/C++ as necessary to allow the use of both legacy software and low-level performance tricks.

That's not to say that I want to write all my code in Objective-C, but I strongly advise that you study its strengths (and the weaknesses of C++) in detail, before you make sweeping generalisations as to their relative worth.

I like the messaging system too, and I'm growing more and more fond of the named variables in the function prototype day by day.
It's nice of you to advice me, mr. Swift. I won't blindly pick a language over another without knowing what I'm trying to solve, either.
I've been writing C++ for four years now and I only have a year of ObjC experience. I came off as a little aggressive and I apologize if i stepped on any toes.
Languages are different, and many have conventions to build better code by means different than other languages, and I can really respect that.

As for the sweeping "generalization"; I explained earlier that that's what I was going for with this thread (general personal preference). I still stand by my opinion, but I learn everyday,
and I might learn to appreciate the peculiar ObjC header files too. So far, I just feel more comfortable with C++ with Netbeans C++ or even gEdit, Notepad++ and Gcc.

This was meant as a general platform thread too, so perhaps it was silly of me to start "complaining" about a language. Really, all I wrote about ObjC was

Too many preprocessor definitions in my opinion, and using brackets (a single character should here be 3) and that sort of function prototypes
is rather of cumbersome. Also I have a hard time getting used to private functions that are not declared in the header...

And you responded with:

To my mind, this is one of the areas where Objective-C blows every other object-oriented language out of the water.

-So if anyone of us made a sweep at anything, it was you, and a big sweep, too.

Edited by SuperVGA, 30 September 2012 - 01:24 PM.


#44 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10235

Posted 07 October 2012 - 06:56 PM

I use Visual Studio a lot, but I'm fine with Notepad++ with a tags plugin and a command line build system. Although if I have to work with the command line I prefer Console2...it's nice being able to copy and paste with ctrl-c/ctrl-v. Posted Image

#45 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2654

Posted 09 October 2012 - 03:05 AM

What is wrong with this thread?
It keeps popping up as having new messages in my watched list, but there never is a new message.
except the one from MJP yesterday, but it has been popping up every day for over a week now.

#46 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8162

Posted 09 October 2012 - 03:47 AM

What is wrong with this thread?
It keeps popping up as having new messages in my watched list, but there never is a new message.
except the one from MJP yesterday, but it has been popping up every day for over a week now.

http://www.gamedev.net/topic/624755-new-unread-post-triggered-by-poll-votes/

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#47 Drakonka   Members   -  Reputation: 252

Posted 11 October 2012 - 06:41 AM

I work on my Mac (running Lion) and play on my Windows PC (currently waiting to be rebuilt after a move). But then, I work with JavaScript and HTML5 which allows plenty of flexibility in terms of what OS one prefers. I just prefer using OS X for most activities. Because the development environment isn't really hardware intensive I can work comfortably on a MacBook Air and carry it everywhere with me, working in coffee shops, parks, etc if I feel like it.

#48 derda4   Banned   -  Reputation: 147

Posted 11 October 2012 - 06:45 AM

I develop mostly on Ubuntu with Eclipse (sometimes with Qtcreator).

#49 SuperVGA   Members   -  Reputation: 1118

Posted 11 October 2012 - 02:39 PM

I work on my Mac (running Lion) and play on my Windows PC (currently waiting to be rebuilt after a move). But then, I work with JavaScript and HTML5 which allows plenty of flexibility in terms of what OS one prefers. I just prefer using OS X for most activities. Because the development environment isn't really hardware intensive I can work comfortably on a MacBook Air and carry it everywhere with me, working in coffee shops, parks, etc if I feel like it.

Well safari is pretty sweet, and there are a lot of nice editors to write html and js in,
so i can understand you. For the web and creative stuff a macbook is ok for me too.

#50 ic0de   Members   -  Reputation: 808

Posted 11 October 2012 - 06:30 PM

I break out DOS and Turbo C++ every once in a while but mostly I use Visual Studio because it looks and functions beautifully. On Linux I use Code::Blocks and Debian because it works a bit like VS.

Edited by ic0de, 11 October 2012 - 06:30 PM.

you know you program too much when you start ending sentences with semicolons;


#51 Heath   Members   -  Reputation: 344

Posted 11 October 2012 - 11:17 PM

I break out DOS and Turbo C++ every once in a while

If you had stopped there, you would have won the thread. :P

#52 Drakonka   Members   -  Reputation: 252

Posted 12 October 2012 - 04:52 AM


I work on my Mac (running Lion) and play on my Windows PC (currently waiting to be rebuilt after a move). But then, I work with JavaScript and HTML5 which allows plenty of flexibility in terms of what OS one prefers. I just prefer using OS X for most activities. Because the development environment isn't really hardware intensive I can work comfortably on a MacBook Air and carry it everywhere with me, working in coffee shops, parks, etc if I feel like it.

Well safari is pretty sweet, and there are a lot of nice editors to write html and js in,
so i can understand you. For the web and creative stuff a macbook is ok for me too.


I mostly use Chrome Canary until I'm testing browser compatibility, but yeah :) Canary + Sublime Text 2 + coffee shop.

#53 derda4   Banned   -  Reputation: 147

Posted 12 October 2012 - 07:56 AM

MacBook...baah, I could buy around 4 equally performant laptops and install OSX86 onto.

#54 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9612

Posted 12 October 2012 - 08:40 AM

MacBook...baah, I could buy around 4 equally performant laptops and install OSX86 onto.

I'd love to see some numbers to back that assertion up.

The cheapest "equally performant" laptop I can find is the HP DV7T at $900, but that comes with an anaemic 1600x900 display resolution - even though you could buy two (and only 2) of those for the price of the Retina MacBook, I'd argue that the retina display is well worth the $1,300 price premium (and I'd never even consider a 17" laptop with less than 1080p resolution).

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#55 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1333

Posted 12 October 2012 - 08:44 AM


umm....how often do u buy windows?

Once per machine, if you are doing things the legal way. You are also implicitly buying Windows every time you buy a PC.

I have quite a number of Windows licenses lying around. Boxed set of Windows 3.1, anyone?

I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.

The "programming environment" I use the most currently is Eclipse Indigo, how ever that is subject to change with whatever I happen to be doing.
The OS I prefer is Windows - mostly owing to it having so many more toys / tools I can work with, AND compatibility with the most resources.
I very rarely use Mac, and only use Linux when forced to ( good gods, when will 1980's style computing die?! ).

Edited by Shippou, 12 October 2012 - 08:51 AM.

 Reactions To Technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

- Douglas Adams 2002


 


#56 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8162

Posted 12 October 2012 - 08:49 AM

I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.

If the hardware is too modern note that you can always use a virtual machine, which (hopefully) has compatible drivers. I boot up Windows 95 in Virtualbox and indulge in some retro gaming every now and then. I had to get a third-party graphics driver but other than that, works well (as far as 95 goes, anyway).

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#57 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1333

Posted 12 October 2012 - 09:36 AM


I'll take it, if you still have all the activation codes - you wouldn't believe how hard it is to get "vintage" games I grew up with to run on a modern OS.

If the hardware is too modern note that you can always use a virtual machine, which (hopefully) has compatible drivers. I boot up Windows 95 in Virtualbox and indulge in some retro gaming every now and then. I had to get a third-party graphics driver but other than that, works well (as far as 95 goes, anyway).

I use DosBox, however there are games that will not run even on that.
If I had the time ( and money ), there would be a computer for every major OS at my place - starting with the TI-99 and Atari SE

 Reactions To Technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

- Douglas Adams 2002


 


#58 derda4   Banned   -  Reputation: 147

Posted 12 October 2012 - 11:57 PM

I'd argue that the retina display is well worth the $1,300 price premium

I'll have a look at the local dealer...but hey it would need to be huge for me to support a patent troll.

only use Linux when forced to ( good gods, when will 1980's style computing die

Not possible...nobody cares if you buy stuff instead.

I use DosBox, however there are games that will not run even on that.

I run Rage, Wolfenstein, Photoshop etc. in Wine 1.4 on Ubuntu.

#59 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9612

Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:17 AM

but hey it would need to be huge for me to support a patent troll.

What, and every other tech company doesn't do the same? It's how the game is played - if you don't like it, go back to using an abacus Posted Image

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#60 derda4   Banned   -  Reputation: 147

Posted 14 October 2012 - 12:36 AM

The whole patent system p* me off and is way below my level.




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