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#1 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1976

Posted 25 September 2012 - 08:44 PM

Today, something got me thinking. Most my friends have no idea I know the slightest bit of programming, never mind 2d Graphics Programming! (Gasp!). Yet when they talk about how they want to be, say, artists or writers, all they talk about is money. There's no, say, passion. I don't think I'll be programming anything amazing in the next (at least) five years. The reason I do it is the passion. Staying up 4 hours debugging for something you should have caught instantly isn't "fun", far from it. It's just a passion of mine. I love doing it. I loved it when I made my first "Hello World" Application two years ago, and I loved it when I finally got a red screen running, and freaked out when it wouldn't close and whenever I ran it "Not Responding" was instantaneously declared in the top left. Slaving over Google for Hours On End trying to figure out what the heck error c2168 means and why it's not letting you run your program, discussing my new-found knowledge on here, and staying up late reading the latest programming book I just bought (that I saw someone recommend on gamedev.net) is a passion. The reason 99% of people quit making their first game is because they're not passionate, and it's not something they love to do. It's taken me two weeks to figure out how the heck I'm going to make an object oriented pong system, and it's taken me two days to debug my feeble 200 lines worth of code paddle class, and I'm not complaining, it was one heck of a ride.

Edited by superman3275, 25 September 2012 - 08:48 PM.

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#2 ShadowValence   Members   -  Reputation: 370

Posted 25 September 2012 - 08:50 PM

It is not your aptitude but your attitude that determines your altitude.

Posted Image

#3 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1976

Posted 25 September 2012 - 08:59 PM

It is not your aptitude but your attitude that determines your altitude.

Posted Image

I agree completely! (HIGH FIVE)

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#4 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8152

Posted 25 September 2012 - 09:31 PM

Slaving over Google for Hours On End trying to figure out what the heck error c2168 means and why it's not letting you run your program

Posted Image

It's taken me two weeks to figure out how the heck I'm going to make an object oriented pong system, and it's taken me two days to debug my feeble 200 lines worth of code paddle class, and I'm not complaining, it was one heck of a ride.

Haha and it doesn't get better with time, either! Just yesterday I spent hours debugging some code, reading it over, and over, and over again, thinking "what is wrong with this??". Then I realized I typed "sphere2" instead of "sphere3" and it was such a stupid copy-paste mistake that I didn't even pay attention to that part of the code. My face when I discover this kind of bug looks somewhat like this -> -_-' And it also usually comes through some sort of subconscious revelation, like there was a background thought process going on that was checking the code in parallel, but more effectively - very strange.

But I know what you mean, the thrill of finally making something work is quite nice - the sense of accomplishment is very gratifying (like finishing homework but better).

Most my friends have no idea I know the slightest bit of programming, never mind 2d Graphics Programming! (Gasp!). Yet when they talk about how they want to be, say, artists or writers, all they talk about is money. There's no, say, passion

I've seen that too. I think it's because they see programming as some miracle moneymaker, where you just download some tool, whip up a few lines of code by piecing together internet tutorials, and sell the resulting game on some mobile platform for thousands of dollars. Probably fueled by "indie successes" where they see scruffy nerds making big bucks and immediately think "I have a computer too, how hard can it be?". The truth is, that just doesn't happen in general, and without passion you'll just lose interest quickly before reaching the good stuff. And what is the sense of accomplishment in copying tutorials without understanding anything you're doing anyway?

This probably belongs in the Lounge, IMHO - more of a discussion thread.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#5 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2959

Posted 25 September 2012 - 09:56 PM

Playing games, fantasizing, and enjoying the learning are the major areas for my passion. I suppose there might be some out there who hate the technicalities but I consume them! Posted Image Even the frustrations are welcome because the resistance to my creativity has many benefits.

I feel, also, that a person can to some extent increase or decrease the passion by choice and the thoughts one decides to hold. Ever picked yourself off the mental ground, smacked the dust, and got back in the saddle with a smile and said something like " Okay, let's give it another round." ? Posted Image


Fireskull

Edited by 3Ddreamer, 25 September 2012 - 09:58 PM.

Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#6 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1103

Posted 26 September 2012 - 01:58 AM

Persistence wins ... Eventually.

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#7 Bregma   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4757

Posted 26 September 2012 - 07:18 AM

I'll tell you what it looks like from the other end of the gravy train.

Most of the people I knew in high school who went into a field 'for the money' dropped out within a few years and went into a completely different field (often real estate sales, for some reason). Some did that, then gave in and followed their passion in their 30s or 40s, and missed some good years of doing what they want. Many had no passion and just fell in to some job they're unhappy with and counting the days until they can retire on full pension.

A handful of people I knew, like myself, followed their passions. We're not monetarily wealthy, but we're phenomenally rich in terms of satisfaction.

So, follow your passion, the money will find you.
Stephen M. Webb
Professional Free Software Developer

#8 joew   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3535

Posted 26 September 2012 - 08:29 AM

It is currently impossible to purchase time with money... therefore make sure you spend your time wisely rather than trading it for something that can be accrued easily. I've always lived by that rule and will only work on projects that I find interesting and that have great opportunities for learning new things.

#9 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9584

Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:44 AM

And welcome to the lounge.

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#10 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1318

Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:27 AM

Interesting ideology, though some folks who responded are lucky enough to get into a field they like, and are fortunate they can pick and choose.

It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.

 Reactions To Technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

- Douglas Adams 2002


 


#11 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9584

Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:46 AM

It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.

Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#12 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4680

Posted 26 September 2012 - 11:50 AM


It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.

Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.

Which leads to this philosophy... "The Man can bring you down. But it's your choice to stay there."
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If you have found any of the posts helpful, please show your appreciation by clicking the up arrow on those posts Posted Image
 
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#13 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1103

Posted 26 September 2012 - 01:57 PM

If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.


Posted Image

Yea, I mean, it's not like we have to deal with external factors that are simply beyond our control. /src

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#14 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1693

Posted 26 September 2012 - 04:21 PM


It's a dog-eat-dog world, were very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing.

Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.


Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation Posted Image

"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


#15 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 9584

Posted 26 September 2012 - 04:36 PM

Or the unemployment rate and the nation's economic situation Posted Image

I have a hard time feeling sorry for all my classmates who chose to major in classical literature, and are now out of work. It was pretty evident that there were no jobs in that field long before they decided on their major.

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.

Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in.

Edited by swiftcoder, 26 September 2012 - 04:38 PM.

Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#16 Heath   Members   -  Reputation: 344

Posted 26 September 2012 - 07:48 PM

When I saw the title of this thread, I thought, "Oh good grief, not another lengthy post about someone's bizarre world-view". But then it turned out to be a thread with a short OP about doing things you like because you like doing them, even when you hate doing them. And that's pretty cool.

<br />Most of the people I knew in high school who went into a field 'for the money' dropped out within a few years and went into a completely different field (often real estate sales, for some reason). Some did that, then gave in and followed their passion in their 30s or 40s, and missed some good years of doing what they want. Many had no passion and just fell in to some job they're unhappy with and counting the days until they can retire on full pension.

Ah, real estate. People really bought it that the value of this one type of asset, unlike any other, will always go up. That is not investment. That's more descriptive of a Ponzi scheme, but especially into the late 90s and early millenium, people greedily drank from "Rich Dad"'s Kool-Aid. That really turned out well, didn't it?

(edit: For the record, I also know that the roots of the real estate crash go far deeper than the line of books by Robert Kiyosaki, so that's a really specific shot at him and maybe a little unfair. People like Kiyosaki are the face of that crisis, but in the higher echelons, people like Angelo Mozilo are worse. Even the application of Ayn Rand's ideology by her pupil, Alan Greenspan, has been just great for the world around us. But all in all, that says nothing of the greed that drove individual home owners to borrow way more than they could repay, buy way more house than they needed, and bankrupt their own futures and those of entire neighborhoods. That was their call.)

Edited by Heath, 26 September 2012 - 08:34 PM.


#17 Amadeus H   Members   -  Reputation: 1180

Posted 27 September 2012 - 12:38 AM

The ones who did it out of love for the subject, and actually worked towards a goal? Most of them have jobs.


This. A hundred times over. There's a huge lack of programmers in my country. Yet, the unpassioned (and frankly, shitty) programmers I went to school with still remain unemployed.

#18 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1103

Posted 27 September 2012 - 03:21 AM

Unemployment is a sad fact of reality for many people, but the affluent kids with college degrees by-and-large made their own bed to sleep in.


How exactly do you define "affluent" in this context?

If you're referring to people who simply went to college, than your concept of affluence is truly bizarre.

Whatever the case may be: Shippou didn't bring up "college", or the present market value of one degree over another. He simply pointed out that "very few folks end up making a living doing what they enjoy doing", which is plainly true.

There's a huge lack of programmers in my country.


I doubt that.

There's a huge lack of *expert* programmers, which is what everyone is looking to hire.

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#19 Amadeus H   Members   -  Reputation: 1180

Posted 27 September 2012 - 04:14 AM

I doubt that.

There's a huge lack of *expert* programmers, which is what everyone is looking to hire.


You are free to doubt it. Though I disagree with the term expert. They're looking for programmers that show promise- and that ties in to what Swiftcoder already has said, and what I wanted to emphasize.

#20 patrrr   Members   -  Reputation: 937

Posted 27 September 2012 - 04:40 AM

Bullshit. If you are lucky enough to be born in a first world country, and to be able to afford a decent education, then the only thing stopping you from making a living in a field you enjoy, is your own poor choices.


An interesting tidbit: Sweden's a third world country.

Edited by patrrr, 27 September 2012 - 04:41 AM.





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