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License for distribute a free software


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#1 Star_AD   Members   -  Reputation: 161

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:49 AM

Hi!

Finally I have finished an application that I was working on. It is an application to create procedural textures.
I want to distribute this software with a public license, It can be downloaded free, but I don't want to distribute the source code.
I was thinking about using a Creative Commons license but, around the web, people advise to use another one for distribute software.
I was also thinking about using a GNU General Public License, but I dont know whether I have to distribute the source code or not.

If anyone has experience on that topic and could help me, I will be very thankful.

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Star_AD, 01 October 2012 - 04:52 AM.


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#2 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:59 AM

Just put a copyright notice, and mark it as freeware with the standard disclaimer of liability.

#3 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7822

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:00 AM

I got the same problem a year before and I never found a free solution to it. For one CC is not tailored to programming and all other free licenses are more or less open source licenses. I've not found any free, closed source license and eventually I went to a laywer to write my own license.

#4 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7822

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:05 AM

Just put a copyright notice, and mark it as freeware with the standard disclaimer of liability.

Well.. this could be dangerous, but it depends on where you live and where you want to distribute your software. I.e. in germany you can't just make a blanket disclaimer of liability, in germany you are always reliable for certain events, therefore a blanket disclaimer could make your license (partly) effectless, when it just has one invalid clause.

Therefore ask a lawyer.

Edited by Ashaman73, 01 October 2012 - 05:07 AM.


#5 Star_AD   Members   -  Reputation: 161

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 05:20 AM

Thanks for the fast answer!
I am living in Spain and I want to distribute my software around the whole world.
I will do that, I will talk with a lawyer friend of mine.
Thanks again.

#6 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 07:31 AM

I was also thinking about using a GNU General Public License, but I dont know whether I have to distribute the source code or not.

The whole point of the GPL is that you're required to provide the source code.
Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.

#7 mholmes   Members   -  Reputation: 189

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 12:12 AM

Use GNU, it just says this is your work, its free to use but you must give credit.

Edited by mholmes, 03 October 2012 - 12:13 AM.


#8 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2907

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:35 AM

Use GNU, it just says this is your work, its free to use but you must give credit.


No it does not. GNU GPL puts up a lot of requirements, like for example the source distribution.
Its also "viral", basically using anything GPL in your project will force you to make your whole project GPL.

with LGPL you don't have to distribute source code, and you don't have the viral part, but its still very far from "this is my work, its free but you must give credit..."

GNU GPL is not only a software license, it also has a political agenda.

You might want to look into MIT or Apache, they are pretty liberal

Edited by Olof Hedman, 03 October 2012 - 06:20 AM.


#9 Star_AD   Members   -  Reputation: 161

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 07:28 AM

You might want to look into MIT or Apache, they are pretty liberal


Thanks, I am looking in this website: http://opensource.or...censes/category
I was looking the MIT license but this isn't that I am looking for.
I don't want the people can sell my software...
For the moment I haven't read the Apache license, this will be the next one.

#10 mdwh   Members   -  Reputation: 891

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 08:42 AM

It's interesting that there aren't really standard licences for closed source software (AFAIK) - the closest is to pick on of the Creative Commons licenses. It's true they recommend the GPL for software, but that is for open source. I'd still say an established licence is better than writing your own.

OOI, why don't you want to release the code, if you're happy to release the program for free?

"I don't want the people can sell my software..."

In that case, no Free or Open Source licence will be useful, as by definition they allow commercial use. But would people be able to sell it, if it's available for free?

Olof Hedman: If that counts as a political agenda, by that reasoning most licences (including proprietary) have a political agenda...
http://erebusrpg.sourceforge.net/ - Erebus, Open Source RPG for Windows/Linux/Android
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mark.harman/conquests.html - Conquests, Open Source Civ-like Game for Windows/Linux

#11 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2907

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 09:15 AM

Olof Hedman: If that counts as a political agenda, by that reasoning most licences (including proprietary) have a political agenda...


The origin of GNU and GPL is a strong belief that all software, as all human ideas, should be open source, and that it should be illegal to hold out on the source code to anything. (including patents, etc)
And it was designed to promote that belief. (a big reason for the "viral" part)

Nothing wrong with that, I think it's a beautiful idea, and it has a lot of merit.
But it's good to know when you choose what license to use, and its far from just "it's free".
GPL is actually pretty complicated, thats why they had to design LGPL to loosen up on the "political"part.

#12 mdwh   Members   -  Reputation: 891

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:51 AM

Fair enough, it just sounded a bit negative Posted Image I agree there are politics behind the GPL. Most licences are inherently "viral", including what the OP is after (if I wanted to distribute his tool in my package, I could no distribute commerciall) - you have to abide by the terms, which can apply to the whole - yes, the idea is to use the same rules of copyright, to trying to preserve freedom for users.

But it's good to know when you choose what license to use, and its far from just "it's free".

Indeed Free/Open Source licences are not public domain, and saying something is free isn't a complete description of a licence (this goes for any freeware or other material that is offered "for free", it doesn't imply that you can do what you like with it). The GPL is about preserving freedom for end users of software, which isn't the same as freedom in a licence for redistribution, that you get more in licenses like BSD. It's impossible to have both, so one has to choose Posted Image

I agree that mholme's description of the GPL was just plain completely wrong.

Edited by mdwh, 04 October 2012 - 08:56 AM.

http://erebusrpg.sourceforge.net/ - Erebus, Open Source RPG for Windows/Linux/Android
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/mark.harman/conquests.html - Conquests, Open Source Civ-like Game for Windows/Linux




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