Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Interested in a FREE copy of HTML5 game maker Construct 2?

We'll be giving away three Personal Edition licences in next Tuesday's GDNet Direct email newsletter!

Sign up from the right-hand sidebar on our homepage and read Tuesday's newsletter for details!


We're also offering banner ads on our site from just $5! 1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


Should I do what I desire, or do something I know I can?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
6 replies to this topic

#1 dothackking   Members   -  Reputation: 104

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:36 PM

Hi there. I've been very interested in game programming for a while now, I've found most sites that teach me are very hard to follow. I'm having another go at it now though, and I wanted to know this for once I get the basics of the language down:

Should I try and make the game that I desire, and only make the parts of it that I think I can, right away

or

Should I do some "challenges" to just train myself up. Things I would never really care about otherwise.



Thanks

Sponsor:

#2 Cornstalks   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6991

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:41 PM

If this is a hobby thing that you're doing in your own free time, why not do something you actually want to and look forward to? Why spend your time doing something you're not interested in?

You may not be able to make the game right this very second (because of skill level or whatever), but you sure as heck can work your way up to it (and make parts/prototypes of it, as you suggest) and learn a ton in the process until you can ultimately realize your goal (or move on to a new goal).
[ I was ninja'd 71 times before I stopped counting a long time ago ] [ f.k.a. MikeTacular ] [ My Blog ] [ SWFer: Gaplessly looped MP3s in your Flash games ]

#3 dothackking   Members   -  Reputation: 104

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:47 PM

If this is a hobby thing that you're doing in your own free time, why not do something you actually want to and look forward to? Why spend your time doing something you're not interested in?

You may not be able to make the game right this very second (because of skill level or whatever), but you sure as heck can work your way up to it (and make parts/prototypes of it, as you suggest) and learn a ton in the process until you can ultimately realize your goal (or move on to a new goal).


That's what I thought, but I didn't know if it was practical in application.

I honestly do not think I'll ever finish the game, I know myself, but, I want to TRY. I don't mind doing really rough write-up type deals of it, if that's what needs done, so your suggestion sounds good.

#4 Haps   Members   -  Reputation: 1315

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 05:56 PM

It's a pretty thin line, though. Like Cornstalks said, it's easier to put time into something you enjoy doing. But if your idea is way beyond your means, it might not be good to go all-in on it. You'll have to assess how closely your abilities match what you want to do, and plan out a reasonable way to achieve it.

If you don't really have much game programming knowledge, keep it simple and follow tutorials to get started then add or change features to cement your knowledge of how they work. Pick something relevant to what you want to do: A platforming adventure game could start off with a side scrolling tutorial. A top down shooter has some common elements with pong.

#5 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3159

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 06:31 PM

BOTH


Clinton

Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#6 Tobl   Members   -  Reputation: 364

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 03 October 2012 - 06:51 PM

As Haps already said, it really depends on how big the gap between your skills and the talent needed is.
A good way to figure out whether you'll be able to cross that gap in the process is to try and construct the general structure of the program. Can you imagine the general way the program is going to work? Can you name your shortcomings and know where you'll have to learn more? Do you know where you'll have to work modular, so that you'll be able to insert the more complex code later on, when you're capable of writing it? Or are you just completely lost and hardly know where to start?
A project you care about is a great way to learn new things (also, you're working on sth. you care about), but it won't do you any good if there's no chance of finishing it. Keep in mind that there'll be a lot of hardships you don't even think of yet.
And finally, don't let me scare you. If you think you can do it and really want to: go for it. There'll always be someone willing to help you with problems you encounter as long as you're willing to put in the same effort.

bw,
Tobl
Think my post was helpful? Want to thank me? Nothing easier than that: I sure am are a sucker for reputation, so just give it a little keycode 38 if you like. ^^

#7 Weapon S   Members   -  Reputation: 126

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 04 October 2012 - 08:10 AM

Always two good things to ask yourself: "do I like doing it?" and "am I learning something from this?". (The third one is: "do I get paid enough for this?" ;) )
I myself have always favored the "things I like" route. It's not very productive, but makes for excellent pastime nevertheless.
That being said, it's always educational to look around and try stuff. You should actually try stuff you think you can't do. Builds character >_>




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS