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I want to be a 2d gameprogrammer. But where should i start?


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#1 Assassinbeast   Members   -  Reputation: 271

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 05:11 PM

Hello gamedev community!Posted Image

I want to know where is the best place to start learning gamedevelopment.

I know c++ quite well and also learned a little about the allegro library and made some minigames. But ive heard that in allegro you cant make multiplayergames over the internet, so i kinda dunno if i should continue learning allegro, because it would some waste of time if i should start learning some other library anyway...

So at this moment im aiming to be a professional 2d gamedeveloper, and my dream is to make a 2d game that is very big and can get into the esports (thats easy enough to say, BUT THATS MY DREAM! and i have a very good idea to my game Posted Image ).

But the big problem is that im a newby when it comes to the background, history and simple knowledge of gamedevelopment and programming. When i read in forums and on the internet, people talk about for example .net framework, win32 and all kinds of crazy stuff i have no idea what it is about. Ive tried to search around, but its hard to find an exact anwser to that. So i dont really know how to start

But anyway. Ive been looking around and i have been thinking about to start learning directx/direct2d because its very popular and there are many books that teaches it. But is it the right choice?
Where should i begin?
What do u suggest i should learn when i in the future want to be a proffessional 2d gamedeveloper if not directx?
What are the best books you guys have experienced from?

this topic might change my life, because im a very motivated guy who loves games and love c++ coding. I started from 2 months ago with this c++ and since then, ive been sticked to the screen and im so happy that i found the beauty about programming and ive come a big long way. Ive found my passion its fun, and its my daily hobby for me.

I would appreciate everyones replies and help

Thank you everyone for taking time to help a noobPosted Image

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#2 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19064

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 08:05 PM

But ive heard that in allegro you cant make multiplayergames over the internet, so i kinda dunno if i should continue learning allegro, because it would some waste of time if i should start learning some other library anyway...

That's not quite correct. I don't believe Allegro includes networking functionality itself -- so you would need to use a networking only library as well -- but you can still use all of the other functionality (windowing, input, drawing, etc.) and create a multi-player game. It's quite normal to use multiple libraries for different purposes, and you would do the same if you had chosen SDL as an alternative to Allegro.

If you'd prefer a similar library that also includes networking however, you might try SFML instead.

#3 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2061

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 09:56 PM

SFML is beast, a lot of people say it is restricted, but with SFML 2.0 all those (insignificant) problems are away. I found that coming from an object oriented standpoint, it's definitely better for newer programmers.

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#4 BaneTrapper   Members   -  Reputation: 1231

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:09 AM

SFML is beast, a lot of people say it is restricted, but with SFML 2.0 all those (insignificant) problems are away. I found that coming from an object oriented standpoint, it's definitely better for newer programmers.

That is correct, sfml 2.0 is HOT at this time.
But SDL should not be a turn off, it is a worthy opponent of sfml.
SDL provides few things better then SFML, but SFML provides more things then SDL and others better then SDL.
its up to personal like at the end.

SDL it currently OLD and there is announced update.
SFML is at the moment HOT with sfml2.0 out and currently kinda hard to find good tutorials about,
but there is SFML documentation on their main page where they provide everything you need to know, and its easy to use.

Edited by BaneTrapper, 06 October 2012 - 04:09 AM.

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The Wanderer, 2d turn based rpg style game

www.gamedev.net/topic/641117-check-up-the-wanderer/


#5 Assassinbeast   Members   -  Reputation: 271

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 05:29 AM


But ive heard that in allegro you cant make multiplayergames over the internet, so i kinda dunno if i should continue learning allegro, because it would some waste of time if i should start learning some other library anyway...

That's not quite correct. I don't believe Allegro includes networking functionality itself -- so you would need to use a networking only library as well -- but you can still use all of the other functionality (windowing, input, drawing, etc.) and create a multi-player game. It's quite normal to use multiple libraries for different purposes, and you would do the same if you had chosen SDL as an alternative to Allegro.

If you'd prefer a similar library that also includes networking however, you might try SFML instead.


Cool... Does that mean if i transition into SFML, then can set my game and servers up, so people all over the world can log on, join chatrooms, create game and play together up to e.g. 20 players etc etc...

Sorry, i know it sounds pretty dumb... but i just want straightfoward answers Posted Image and not going into the wrong direction, because i just started 2 months ago from scratch, and i dont really know about client/servers/ip/udp and all those crazy things. but im pretty sure it costs money (from my experience when i was a kid and play online games) if u need to set servers up that are not lagging.

But with my knowlegde about c++ and programming... i can barely imagine how to set up chatrooms/servers. But i know i can learn it.

Anyway... thank you for helping me. gamedev community rocks!

#6 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 19064

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 12:17 AM

SFML is useful for developing your client-side applications -- the actual game that your players would run.

Unless your clients are connecting to each other directly (this is called "peer-to-peer" networking) you would also need to develop a server application separately. You could theoretically do this using the networking functionality SFML provides as well, but it would probably not be the ideal choice for your server code. You would also need to have one or more servers for your players to connect to -- and yes, if you want to provide a lag-free playing experience world-wide this can potentially be quite expensive.


Online multi-player is a pretty advanced topic, and it can be a very difficult task to get everything working smoothly. If you've only started learning from scratch a couple of months ago multi-player (other than perhaps starting to play around with simple one-to-one chat or very simple two-player games) is probably something you would be better to put aside until you are more experienced. I won't go so far as to tell you not to try it if it's what really interests you, but I would strongly recommend getting more comfortable with the basics of game development as well as programming in general before you try to tackle online multi-player.

In the meantime, working with SFML -- or Allegro and later having to learn a separate networking library for that matter -- is a good choice that will not hold you back in the long run, and personally I would suggest you continue learning. Once you're comfortable creating single-player games you could try moving on to basic multi-player (that is, two players, directly connected rather than than via a server) and then eventually work your way up to more complex online multi-player games with a server.


Don't worry about potentially having to learn new libraries in the long run -- that isn't something you should be concerned about or trying to avoid -- skilled professional developers use many languages and libraries during their career, and successful independent and professional games often use many libraries for any given game. If you stick with it and become a skilled programmer you will learn to use multiple languages and libraries too!


Hope that's helpful! Posted Image

#7 Assassinbeast   Members   -  Reputation: 271

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Posted 07 October 2012 - 05:53 AM

SFML is useful for developing your client-side applications -- the actual game that your players would run.

Unless your clients are connecting to each other directly (this is called "peer-to-peer" networking) you would also need to develop a server application separately. You could theoretically do this using the networking functionality SFML provides as well, but it would probably not be the ideal choice for your server code. You would also need to have one or more servers for your players to connect to -- and yes, if you want to provide a lag-free playing experience world-wide this can potentially be quite expensive.


Online multi-player is a pretty advanced topic, and it can be a very difficult task to get everything working smoothly. If you've only started learning from scratch a couple of months ago multi-player (other than perhaps starting to play around with simple one-to-one chat or very simple two-player games) is probably something you would be better to put aside until you are more experienced. I won't go so far as to tell you not to try it if it's what really interests you, but I would strongly recommend getting more comfortable with the basics of game development as well as programming in general before you try to tackle online multi-player.

In the meantime, working with SFML -- or Allegro and later having to learn a separate networking library for that matter -- is a good choice that will not hold you back in the long run, and personally I would suggest you continue learning. Once you're comfortable creating single-player games you could try moving on to basic multi-player (that is, two players, directly connected rather than than via a server) and then eventually work your way up to more complex online multi-player games with a server.


Don't worry about potentially having to learn new libraries in the long run -- that isn't something you should be concerned about or trying to avoid -- skilled professional developers use many languages and libraries during their career, and successful independent and professional games often use many libraries for any given game. If you stick with it and become a skilled programmer you will learn to use multiple languages and libraries too!


Hope that's helpful! Posted Image


It was indeed helpfull!! thank you so much Posted Image




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