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Breaking in from another country


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#1 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 05:53 AM

Hi everyone,

This is my first topic so I will try to make it short. I want to work in the USA as QA, because in my country there isn't any gaming company or gaminig industry, but I don't know anything about imigration law, visas, work visa,etc. I know someone will say read the FAQ, and yes I did, and it wasn't very helpful. So I'm looking for somone to explain to me what should I do, to come and work here in the United States. And one more question. What's the status on the job market in the gaming industry, with the crisis, and all. Just because the USA is big that doesn't mean jobs are guaranteed, right?

Thanks in advance

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#2 Orymus3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 10546

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 08:35 AM

Hi Noddy92,

Where are you from exactly?

#3 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10139

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 11:01 AM

I want to work in the USA as QA, because in my country there isn't any gaming company or gaminig industry, but I don't know anything about imigration law, visas, work visa,etc. I know someone will say read the FAQ, and yes I did, and it wasn't very helpful.


How could I make the FAQ more helpful?
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#4 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22683

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 02:00 PM

I thought it was fairly simple to find in the FAQs: FAQ27 Location Location Location

Why should employer take a risk on you -- with the added costs of getting the paperwork in order, getting the legal issues worked out, flying you halfway around the world, etc.--- when they can just as easily take a risk for less money on a local individual who is likely just as talented?

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#5 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 05:40 AM

Why should employer take a risk on you -- with the added costs of getting the paperwork in order, getting the legal issues worked out, flying you halfway around the world, etc.--- when they can just as easily take a risk for less money on a local individual who is likely just as talented?


Yes, I know that employer would risk or for that matterspend his money on someone from another country to get him an interview, my question was what sould I do to get a job in the United States. Should I come there permanently, or get a work visa. And I'm from Serbia, for those who didn't check the map it used to be Yugoslavia.

#6 Orymus3   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 10546

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 08:18 AM

Hey Noddy92.
My personal recommandation, because I've had a bit of experience with some folks from that part of the world trying to break in:
Try to find a studio nearby. I understand Serbia, Croatia and the likes don't have studios, but you're likely to find Quality Assurance studios in Romania for example, and even in Ukraine. A lot of International companies have offices in these areas, and its a good way to break in.

Proove yourself at one of these and you may, after a few years, get a suitable one-way ticket to the USA. I'm not saying this is guaranteed, but I've seen it happen quite a few times.

The reason I'm suggesting this is because USA is actually a hard country to "get in". Even getting a work visa is challenging. If anyone with experience getting a work visa could add a bit here, that'd help.

#7 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6288

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 08:19 AM

There are quite a few serbian game developers so you could always try there first. (Nordeus and Eipix for example)
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#8 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10139

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 08:50 AM

my question was what sould I do to get a job in the United States. Should I come there permanently, or get a work visa.


You have to get a work visa. Without one, you can't get a job in the US. The FAQ says that. This website and community can tell you about the game industry. Information about the immigration process and immigration law is far outside the scope of what this community can offer. You need to spend your time on immigration sites rather than game industry sites if you want to learn about immigration.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#9 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 04:43 AM

I read the entire FAQ, I just had a problem with the topic about Comincg to America (FAQ 72). It seems that you were more arguing with the guy then helping, but I was confused on the second question "But then I checked the website of the American visa authority and read that if I had a work offer in writing, then I can get the visa. Do I understand correctly?" , you said you didn't know. Could you please find an answer from someone who knows or who can explain?

There are quite a few serbian game developers so you could always try there first. (Nordeus and Eipix for example)


I'm pretty sure those studios are closed, because I didn't see or hear anything abouthem them in the past six years. There have been several other studios, but they all were shutdown after one or two games.

Ukraine and Romania seems like a good idea I might try it, but I'm afraid to get stuck down there working on some bad game, that will never breakthrough. I noticed nobody didn't posted something about a job market, what's the status over there, because here it is hard to find a regular job, let alone in computer industry.

Thanks for the advices

#10 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6288

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 06:05 AM

I'm pretty sure those studios are closed, because I didn't see or hear anything abouthem them in the past six years. There have been several other studios, but they all were shutdown after one or two games.


Eipix is still alive and released a new game earlier this year(Final Cut: Death on the Silver Screen), Nordeus is doing extremely well and is currently hiring (22 open positions).
I don't suffer from insanity, I'm enjoying every minute of it.
The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!

#11 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10139

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 10:43 AM

I was confused on the second question "But then I checked the website of the American visa authority and read that if I had a work offer in writing, then I can get the visa. Do I understand correctly?" , you said you didn't know. Could you please find an answer from someone who knows or who can explain?


What would I do that is different from what you would do, to find out the answer to that question? I do not have friends who work in immigration. The only sources of information available to me are the same sources of information that are available to you. You want to learn about immigration. This is not an immigration forum. This is a game industry forum. I'm sorry, but this question goes beyond what can be given here.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#12 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14196

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 06:19 PM

"But then I checked the website of the American visa authority and read that if I had a work offer in writing, then I can get the visa. Do I understand correctly?" , you said you didn't know. Could you please find an answer from someone who knows or who can explain?

I am from America and conversely I have never worked in America, seeking instead to leave the country.
So I can’t give you any certainties on American laws, but my experience working overseas might be similar to how it works in America.

When I came to Japan from Thailand, the company wanting to hire me prepared a letter for immigration stating their intent to hire me, how I knew about Japanese law and promised not to break any, etc. (I did jay-walk once though).
It wasn’t clear whether this was required by law (and I doubt it is) or just a good idea, but in any case it wouldn’t hurt.
And even in the case of Japan, such a letter is not a guarantee that you will get in. It is just helpful and a way to cover all your bases (though if you are a normal human without a criminal record, there is little chance you would be denied if a company is trying to hire you).



Ultimately, this really doesn’t matter.
If a company wants to hire you, they will know what needs to be done with immigration.
Like in Japan, even if a letter from a company has any meaning to immigration, it is absolutely no guarantee that you will actually be accepted by immigration (though the risk of not being accepted is low if all the paperwork is in order).
The hard part is finding a company that will hire you, and you should be more concerned with that.

I got hired overseas with no prior experience, but I wasn’t applying in America.
For America to do that is likely extremely rare.

However, the only way to guarantee that it eventually does happen is to try, try, and try again.
Then get frustrated and give up.
And then try some more. Until it happens.


L. Spiro

Edited by L. Spiro, 23 October 2012 - 12:01 AM.

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#13 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 04:28 AM

Eipix is still alive and released a new game earlier this year(Final Cut: Death on the Silver Screen), Nordeus is doing extremely well and is currently hiring (22 open positions).


Oops, I didn't know that, so I apologize if I insulted them.

I do not have friends who work in immigration. The only sources of information available to me are the same sources of information that are available to you. You want to learn about immigration. This is not an immigration forum. This is a game industry forum. I'm sorry, but this question goes beyond what can be given here.


What I meant was isn't there anyone in the industry who could say, "when I had to come here, Ihad to do this and that". But I guess you're right, this question can't be answered here, I look for answer somewhere else. Thanks for help
.

Edited by Noddy92, 18 October 2012 - 07:10 AM.


#14 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 22683

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 10:41 AM


I do not have friends who work in immigration. The only sources of information available to me are the same sources of information that are available to you. You want to learn about immigration. This is not an immigration forum. This is a game industry forum. I'm sorry, but this question goes beyond what can be given here.

What I meant was isn't there anyone in the industry who could say, "when I had to come here, Ihad to do this and that". But I guess you're right, this question can't be answered here, I look for answer somewhere else. Thanks for help

When I worked with a company that handled immigration and visas, I learned that every country has their own set of rules and that those rules are constantly changing.

Advice on what is necessary from a particular country can change as quickly as international politics fluctuate.

It most certainly can be done, you just need to convince an employer that your skills are worth the extra burden and costs.

Check out my book, Game Development with Unity, aimed at beginners who want to build fun games fast.

Also check out my personal website at bryanwagstaff.com, where I write about assorted stuff.


#15 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 04:26 AM

When I worked with a company that handled immigration and visas, I learned that every country has their own set of rules and that those rules are constantly changing.

Advice on what is necessary from a particular country can change as quickly as international politics fluctuate.

It most certainly can be done, you just need to convince an employer that your skills are worth the extra burden and costs.


Thanks for the tip

#16 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 04:28 AM


When I worked with a company that handled immigration and visas, I learned that every country has their own set of rules and that those rules are constantly changing.

Advice on what is necessary from a particular country can change as quickly as international politics fluctuate.

It most certainly can be done, you just need to convince an employer that your skills are worth the extra burden and costs.


Thanks for the tip, now it would be even more difficult to come to USA Posted Image



#17 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 04:30 AM

When I worked with a company that handled immigration and visas, I learned that every country has their own set of rules and that those rules are constantly changing.

Advice on what is necessary from a particular country can change as quickly as international politics fluctuate.

It most certainly can be done, you just need to convince an employer that your skills are worth the extra burden and costs.


Thanks for the tip, I'll go check out rules and regualtions right now.

#18 Noddy92   Members   -  Reputation: 185

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 05:47 AM

Ok, I checked the regualtions, and I understand them all, but there is just one big problem. You see to get to United States, you need a fortune, just an airline ticket to let's say New York is 500 euros (650 us dollars), which is to expensive for me. So I will make my game here, and collect money to get to the US. Wish me luck




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