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Want to make a Command and conquer clone and I am a total beginner.


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#1 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 10:07 PM

Okay so firstly this is my first post, Hie :3

Now that the intro is out of the way, I want to make a game like Command and Conquer, a clone if you will and I was hoping to make it in OpenGL, C++, Lua and well, anything else I need just as long as those three are in there and did I mention I was a beginner that has never so much as worked with simple word game in a console app? Yea, I'm kind of lost here and just want to know where to start and how to build from nothing.

Why am I bent on C++, Lua and OpenGL? Because I like to be cross-platform since I run Windows and Linux Duel at random times however if you have alternatives that would prove compatible then by all means, I'm up for suggestions. C++ however is stuck for the long haul because I am currently knee deep in study with it.

Goal:

C&C clone with full networking up to 10 players

Sponsor:

#2 CJ_COIMBRA   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 834

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:41 AM

That´s kind of a huge task for a begginer as you described yourself. Sometimes starting projects that you will later discover cannot be completed will bring your motivation down. But hey, do whatever you find interesting with your time. You could start with getting assets loaded, render your sprites on screen and discard them when not needed anymore. You should be busy with that for some time.

Also, consider using some libraries such as SFML or SDL to simplify your tasks.

Edited by CJ_COIMBRA, 28 October 2012 - 07:42 AM.


#3 Matt-D   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1469

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 08:08 AM

You may also consider contributing to some of the open-source projects (or, if anything, examining the way they do things to assess the scale of the enterprise):
FreeCNC: http://freecnc.org/
FreeRA: http://freera.sourceforge.net/
OpenRA: http://openra.res0l.net/
OpenRedAlert: http://sourceforge.n...s/openredalert/
Stratagus: http://stratagus.com/ // this one can be used as an engine: http://stratagus.com/games.shtml

http://voices.yahoo....ime-720261.html

Edited by Matt-D, 28 October 2012 - 08:18 AM.


#4 Silgen   Members   -  Reputation: 178

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 08:16 AM

I'm still a beginner, working my way up from pong clones, tic-tac-toe and the like. I'm currently doing a simple mario style platformer. I've run into a fair amount of problems, asked on the forums, read articles etc. and played around with the code until I can solve them. In my personal experience, things are never as simple as they initially might seem.

Unless you are a god-tier programmer, there are two commonly suggested routes to take:

1. Take your current idea, and simplify it to the point where you can accomplish it with your current skills (or those not far out of your reach.)
2. Start smaller, with something like SFML (I find this a lot nicer to use than SDL), and create classic arcade game clones. Working from extremely simple - like tic-tac-toe, through pong, tetris, pacman, mario etc. until you have the understanding required to create the games you actually want to make.

Are you new to game development or programming?

#5 Zelda.Alex   Members   -  Reputation: 119

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 10:06 AM

So you are starting and want to make a command & conquer clone. Great. If you can keep at it then you may be able to do this.

Your main requirement is being cross-platform? Making a game of that size with the three you mentioned will take a lot of time. Why not try some game engine? I am also starting with 3D games and am using Unity3D engine. It has a lot of tutorials present.

#6 superman3275   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2061

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 10:11 AM

I'm still a beginner, working my way up from pong clones, tic-tac-toe and the like. I'm currently doing a simple mario style platformer. I've run into a fair amount of problems, asked on the forums, read articles etc. and played around with the code until I can solve them. In my personal experience, things are never as simple as they initially might seem.

Unless you are a god-tier programmer, there are two commonly suggested routes to take:

1. Take your current idea, and simplify it to the point where you can accomplish it with your current skills (or those not far out of your reach.)
2. Start smaller, with something like SFML (I find this a lot nicer to use than SDL), and create classic arcade game clones. Working from extremely simple - like tic-tac-toe, through pong, tetris, pacman, mario etc. until you have the understanding required to create the games you actually want to make.

Are you new to game development or programming?

I'm in the middle of developing my first Tile-Based game (Just finished Breakout Posted Image!) and I can say nothing is as simple as it seems. I've been able to work through a lot of problems by thinking extensively about my code before and while programming, however there's always trouble spots. It's good to have trouble spots though, because with every one you learn new things. That's the point of starting with Tic-Tac-Toe and making ever more complex games. With every one there is something new involved that you'll probably use later, and running into a problem in the middle of developing an actual game is far worse than running into a problem in the learning stage. If your dreams are actually a passion and it's not something you'll give up on, then go through the development ladder and see if it's something you like.

For example, file input and output. This is a large part of a Tile-Based game and I had no idea how it worked or what it's uses are. I can now successfully say I fully understand how it works and how to create my own maps. My hope is to eventually create a level editor for my game using my knowledge, however you must take it one step at a time (Despite how annoying it is Posted Image!). There's an insane amount of knowledge that you're going to to need to make your dream game, and if you go through the steps of development chances are that won't be your only dream game, you'll have many!

Edited by superman3275, 28 October 2012 - 10:14 AM.

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Want to ask about Python, Flask, wxPython, Pygame, C++, HTML5, CSS3, Javascript, jQuery, C++, Vimscript, SFML 1.6 / 2.0, or anything else? Recruiting for a game development team and need a passionate programmer? Just want to talk about programming? Email me here:

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#7 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 10:24 AM

Prototype it in Unity3D while you're brushing up on your C++ skills. When your C++ is good enough to actually support the game, your unit logic will transfer over pretty seamlessly.

#8 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:00 PM

I'm still a beginner, working my way up from pong clones, tic-tac-toe and the like. I'm currently doing a simple mario style platformer. I've run into a fair amount of problems, asked on the forums, read articles etc. and played around with the code until I can solve them. In my personal experience, things are never as simple as they initially might seem.

Unless you are a god-tier programmer, there are two commonly suggested routes to take:

1. Take your current idea, and simplify it to the point where you can accomplish it with your current skills (or those not far out of your reach.)
2. Start smaller, with something like SFML (I find this a lot nicer to use than SDL), and create classic arcade game clones. Working from extremely simple - like tic-tac-toe, through pong, tetris, pacman, mario etc. until you have the understanding required to create the games you actually want to make.

Are you new to game development or programming?


New to Game programming, I played with Higher level languages like Python and decided to move on to C++.

#9 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:02 PM

So you are starting and want to make a command & conquer clone. Great. If you can keep at it then you may be able to do this.

Your main requirement is being cross-platform? Making a game of that size with the three you mentioned will take a lot of time. Why not try some game engine? I am also starting with 3D games and am using Unity3D engine. It has a lot of tutorials present.


Yes, I like to use Linux sometimes and support OS freedom. An I will take a look into Unity3D seeing as others seem to agree with you. Thanks :P

#10 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:39 PM

Prototype it in Unity3D while you're brushing up on your C++ skills. When your C++ is good enough to actually support the game, your unit logic will transfer over pretty seamlessly.


It appears Unity3D only supports JavaScript, C#, and a dialect of Python named Boo. How will C++ come into effect here?

#11 joew   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3679

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 11:18 PM

He meant to prototype your game in Unity getting the gameplay mechanics down, getting units defined, etc and have things running while you continue to split your time learning the C++ language. That way once you are confident enough in your C++ skills you would be able to quickly port your gameplay code, etc if you were still planning on building the game in that language.

#12 thedevsykes   Members   -  Reputation: 336

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 04:47 AM

In university we actually get off starting on Turn Based Strategy/Platformers/Tower Defense games.. but thats besides the point. My advice is to go for it. Personally, if anything you'll aquire experience, and understand the scope of the project, and then likely realise its currently beyond your reach. The idea is not to get disheartened but instead analyse what you have done, understand where you weaknesses are, and work on something smaller that helps to improve those weak spots. Thats what I did at least.. and 3 years down the line I still haven't made my uber 3D RPG with Squirrels armed with AKs in war with the evil Badgers. Same times :(

Have fun with it ;)
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#13 AMenard   Members   -  Reputation: 175

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 09:22 AM

The best advice I can give you, is to set realistic goals. Making a C&C clone as a starting project for someone who has yet to learn how to program may be a bit over the top. I'm not saying that you should forget about it, just that you should instead make it a goal to reach in the long term. The recommended path on this site is to start with something really simple, like Tic-Tac-To then move to more complex game like Break Out or Space Invader type, then plateformer and then on to more complex, multiplayer games like C&C if you still have the interest.

I find a good source of inspiration is the emulator scene. Get yourself a nice C64 or Atari 8bit computer emulator and some games. Look what they did and try to make a better and modern version of those games (there are thousands of arcade, strategy & rpg to chose from and most where made to fit in 32k of ram!). This will be helpful in boosting your confidence before you move to more complex games.
My blogs:

http://www.osrebel.com <-- En Français
L'information libre et la joie d'apprendre

http://www.osrebel.com/english <-- English Version
Free information and the joy of learning

#14 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 07:01 PM

The best advice I can give you, is to set realistic goals. Making a C&C clone as a starting project for someone who has yet to learn how to program may be a bit over the top. I'm not saying that you should forget about it, just that you should instead make it a goal to reach in the long term. The recommended path on this site is to start with something really simple, like Tic-Tac-To then move to more complex game like Break Out or Space Invader type, then plateformer and then on to more complex, multiplayer games like C&C if you still have the interest.

I find a good source of inspiration is the emulator scene. Get yourself a nice C64 or Atari 8bit computer emulator and some games. Look what they did and try to make a better and modern version of those games (there are thousands of arcade, strategy & rpg to chose from and most where made to fit in 32k of ram!). This will be helpful in boosting your confidence before you move to more complex games.


But would I base the starter games on a console app or some gui app?

#15 AMenard   Members   -  Reputation: 175

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 07:55 PM


The best advice I can give you, is to set realistic goals. Making a C&amp;C clone as a starting project for someone who has yet to learn how to program may be a bit over the top. I'm not saying that you should forget about it, just that you should instead make it a goal to reach in the long term. The recommended path on this site is to start with something really simple, like Tic-Tac-To then move to more complex game like Break Out or Space Invader type, then plateformer and then on to more complex, multiplayer games like C&amp;C if you still have the interest.

I find a good source of inspiration is the emulator scene. Get yourself a nice C64 or Atari 8bit computer emulator and some games. Look what they did and try to make a better and modern version of those games (there are thousands of arcade, strategy &amp; rpg to chose from and most where made to fit in 32k of ram!). This will be helpful in boosting your confidence before you move to more complex games.


But would I base the starter games on a console app or some gui app?


Start by the basics. Try to do some simple text console game, then when you feel up to it, move to a graphic game, maybe by using a library like allegro, some simple arcade game maybe. By then, you'll have an idea of what it takes to even make a simple sprite based game. If you are still up to the challenge, you can try to modify your game to make it multi players. Then, if you intend to make your game a networked one, you'll have to learn that too.

Also, keep in mind that writing code is only a small part of game creation, albeit an important one. If your future rts project has dozen of different type of units and building, someone will have to draw those also, and if they are animated then each type of unit will need many frames of animations also. Then there is the audio part. Will it have music and SFX? You'll also need to create those. And finally, your RTS will also need some missions/campaigns. Those will have to be scripted and balanced...

As you can see, you have to consider the scale of the job. I'm not saying that in due time you'll be able to create your dream rts, but you may need the help of a few friends or a lot of time. One thing you should do is look at what is being done in the indie market and check how many people worked on those project.

My blogs:

http://www.osrebel.com <-- En Français
L'information libre et la joie d'apprendre

http://www.osrebel.com/english <-- English Version
Free information and the joy of learning

#16 Spike E   Members   -  Reputation: 106

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 08:13 PM



The best advice I can give you, is to set realistic goals. Making a C&amp;C clone as a starting project for someone who has yet to learn how to program may be a bit over the top. I'm not saying that you should forget about it, just that you should instead make it a goal to reach in the long term. The recommended path on this site is to start with something really simple, like Tic-Tac-To then move to more complex game like Break Out or Space Invader type, then plateformer and then on to more complex, multiplayer games like C&amp;C if you still have the interest.

I find a good source of inspiration is the emulator scene. Get yourself a nice C64 or Atari 8bit computer emulator and some games. Look what they did and try to make a better and modern version of those games (there are thousands of arcade, strategy &amp; rpg to chose from and most where made to fit in 32k of ram!). This will be helpful in boosting your confidence before you move to more complex games.


But would I base the starter games on a console app or some gui app?


Start by the basics. Try to do some simple text console game, then when you feel up to it, move to a graphic game, maybe by using a library like allegro, some simple arcade game maybe. By then, you'll have an idea of what it takes to even make a simple sprite based game. If you are still up to the challenge, you can try to modify your game to make it multi players. Then, if you intend to make your game a networked one, you'll have to learn that too.

Also, keep in mind that writing code is only a small part of game creation, albeit an important one. If your future rts project has dozen of different type of units and building, someone will have to draw those also, and if they are animated then each type of unit will need many frames of animations also. Then there is the audio part. Will it have music and SFX? You'll also need to create those. And finally, your RTS will also need some missions/campaigns. Those will have to be scripted and balanced...

As you can see, you have to consider the scale of the job. I'm not saying that in due time you'll be able to create your dream rts, but you may need the help of a few friends or a lot of time. One thing you should do is look at what is being done in the indie market and check how many people worked on those project.


Well, I was hoping to make a Pong game with full networking so a friend and I could test it. Also for Sound I was hoping to have a noise every time the ball hit the paddle an maybe have a speed setting for how fast the ball goes. Would a console app be sufficient for that?

#17 AMenard   Members   -  Reputation: 175

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 06:28 AM




The best advice I can give you, is to set realistic goals. Making a C&amp;C clone as a starting project for someone who has yet to learn how to program may be a bit over the top. I'm not saying that you should forget about it, just that you should instead make it a goal to reach in the long term. The recommended path on this site is to start with something really simple, like Tic-Tac-To then move to more complex game like Break Out or Space Invader type, then plateformer and then on to more complex, multiplayer games like C&amp;C if you still have the interest.

I find a good source of inspiration is the emulator scene. Get yourself a nice C64 or Atari 8bit computer emulator and some games. Look what they did and try to make a better and modern version of those games (there are thousands of arcade, strategy &amp; rpg to chose from and most where made to fit in 32k of ram!). This will be helpful in boosting your confidence before you move to more complex games.


But would I base the starter games on a console app or some gui app?


Start by the basics. Try to do some simple text console game, then when you feel up to it, move to a graphic game, maybe by using a library like allegro, some simple arcade game maybe. By then, you'll have an idea of what it takes to even make a simple sprite based game. If you are still up to the challenge, you can try to modify your game to make it multi players. Then, if you intend to make your game a networked one, you'll have to learn that too.

Also, keep in mind that writing code is only a small part of game creation, albeit an important one. If your future rts project has dozen of different type of units and building, someone will have to draw those also, and if they are animated then each type of unit will need many frames of animations also. Then there is the audio part. Will it have music and SFX? You'll also need to create those. And finally, your RTS will also need some missions/campaigns. Those will have to be scripted and balanced...

As you can see, you have to consider the scale of the job. I'm not saying that in due time you'll be able to create your dream rts, but you may need the help of a few friends or a lot of time. One thing you should do is look at what is being done in the indie market and check how many people worked on those project.


Well, I was hoping to make a Pong game with full networking so a friend and I could test it. Also for Sound I was hoping to have a noise every time the ball hit the paddle an maybe have a speed setting for how fast the ball goes. Would a console app be sufficient for that?


If you use a game library like Allegro to make your game, it won't be a text/console app. You'll be using the graphics routine and making a real game with animated sprite and sound. I recommend this video tutorial on the subject: http://fixbyproximity.com/2d-game-development-course . It is well made and it show you how to use Allegro to make a game, from game loop, to sprites, to sound. Try it out. You can get Allegro here and the first chapter of the tutorial is on how to install it into Visual Studio Express 2010/2012 (Free!). I linked the 2012 version .iso file. You'll be using Visual C++ for the tutorial. The .iso also include C# and VB.Net if you want to try them also.
My blogs:

http://www.osrebel.com <-- En Français
L'information libre et la joie d'apprendre

http://www.osrebel.com/english <-- English Version
Free information and the joy of learning




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