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Based On Your Experience, What Is The Best Library For Opengl 1.4?


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#1 nightrobin   Members   -  Reputation: 127

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 08:59 PM

My netbook only supports openGL version 1.4, my GPU is intel gma 3150, so for you what is the best library/tools to use or somewhat great move to make/advice, there are no wrong answers, (I am trying to create a game)

PS: I already check the net for resources but, opengl (redbook) 4th edition is scarce (and redbook for v1.1
is already deprecated and is very OLD than what I'm looking for), besides I don't have money to buy a
new laptop or a opengl book from online shop because international delivery is very expensive, I'm from
outside US.

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#2 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7976

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 09:13 PM

In the spirit of "there are no wrong answers": read up some on GL_ARB_vertex_program and GL_ARB_fragment_program; they're not as good as a more modern shader interface, but your Intel does support them and they will enable you to break out of the fixed pipeline trap somewhat.

For learning resources you may have more luck finding a 3rd Edition Superbible - this covered up to GL 1.5 and had a section at the back going into some detail about these two shader extensions, as well as (the then formative) first version of GLSL.

Edited by mhagain, 01 November 2012 - 04:53 AM.

It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.


#3 V-man   Members   -  Reputation: 805

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 05:14 AM

What do you mean by library? What exactly do you want to do?
If you just want to create a GL window, then use freeGLUT, SDL or the several other solutions.
If you need a graphics engine, there is Ogre3D and many others out there.

mhagain said GL_ARB_vertex_program and GL_ARB_fragment_program but these aren't libraries. These are GL extensions which are quite old by now.
I strongly recommend getting a GL 2.0 card at minimum and use shaders for rendering everything.
If you really want to stick with Intel, stick to GL 1.1 since their GL drivers are terrible or just go with Direct3D.
Sig: http://glhlib.sourceforge.net
an open source GLU replacement library. Much more modern than GLU.
float matrix[16], inverse_matrix[16];
glhLoadIdentityf2(matrix);
glhTranslatef2(matrix, 0.0, 0.0, 5.0);
glhRotateAboutXf2(matrix, angleInRadians);
glhScalef2(matrix, 1.0, 1.0, -1.0);
glhQuickInvertMatrixf2(matrix, inverse_matrix);
glUniformMatrix4fv(uniformLocation1, 1, FALSE, matrix);
glUniformMatrix4fv(uniformLocation2, 1, FALSE, inverse_matrix);

#4 Aks9   Members   -  Reputation: 861

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Posted 03 November 2012 - 06:30 AM

If you really want to stick with Intel, stick to GL 1.1 since their GL drivers are terrible or just go with Direct3D.

Intel's hardware has been really terrible until HD2000.
HD2000/3000 is, as far as I know, the first Intel's GPU that supports multisampling, and is GL3.3 compatible.
On third generation i-processors (equipped with HD2500/4000) even GL4.0 is fully supported.

Well, there is something interesting in the behavior of the drivers (something that works on both NV and AMD makes problem on Intel), but I cannot say it is not correct, just we are not used to. Posted Image

I have a very limited experience with HD2500 since it is too weak to be used for real 3D applications, although GL4.0 support is quite peasant.

I also have GMA3150 (on the netbook), but it cannot be used for anything. It is a real trash, since there are only two fragmet shaders, while vertex shaders are emulated in software.

In short, only the latest Intel's i-processors (2nd and 3rd generation) are good enough to be used for "trying" GL graphics programming. It should be kept in mind when buying new laptops. For serious work, at the moment, I wouldn't suggest anything less than GeForce GT 640M (currently the least expensive Kepler based graphics card for laptops). In fact, that's what I'm planning to bay. Posted Image




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