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Best books for learning about Data Structures/Algorithms?


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#1 Bill Fountaine   Members   -  Reputation: 193

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:23 PM

I want to get the fundamentals of computer programming/science down, at first I figured learning a language was it. But I was obviously wrong.

Is there anything other than Data Structures/Algorithms that I am missing, or is that it?

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#2 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 21318

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:52 PM

The core of programming is data structures and the algorithms that use them, yes.

It isn't a little thing, though. A seemingly small topic of serialization algorithms covers not just saving data to files, but also network communications, parallel processing, shared data in threading, and graphics rendering. Algorithms cover not just sorting and searching, but also cryptography, AI, and complex physics engines.

The software language is just a tool used to express it. Languages come and go, but algorithms and data structures are fundamental.

Edited by frob, 05 November 2012 - 01:56 PM.

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#3 slayemin   Members   -  Reputation: 2600

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:35 PM

You can never go wrong by getting the Big White Book.

Eric Nevala

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#4 Alpha_ProgDes   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4688

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:52 PM

May I suggest looking through the book "Data Structures for Game Programmers" Posted Image
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#5 Sirisian   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1756

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:54 PM

I'd start with what slayemin wrote as it's the standard book. I recommend getting a formal education because the math used in algorithm analysis is non-trivial to learn by yourself. Even something that sounds simple as proving the run-time of merge sort with a recurrence relation quickly gets out of hand when learning to find the run-time of quick sort. Needless to say algorithm and data structure books tend to range from practical overviews to very indepth analysis and discussion.

A more complicated book would be Algorithm Design. It's designed for people that already know basic algorithms and data structures to an extent. Someone in their senior year of CS would be able to read it essentially.

#6 Bill Fountaine   Members   -  Reputation: 193

Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:00 PM

I'll be sure to check them out. I need to brush up on my math skills, thankfully Khanacademy seems like a good place for that.

#7 Dwarf King   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1855

Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:17 PM

May I suggest looking through the book "Data Structures for Game Programmers" Posted Image


I second that. That book are one of the best books ever.

"The only thing that interferes with my learning is my education"

Albert Einstein

"It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education"

Albert Einstein

 


#8 booomji   Members   -  Reputation: 247

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:01 AM

I want to get the fundamentals of computer programming/science down, at first I figured learning a language was it. But I was obviously wrong.


Came to the same conclusion myself after many years.
As others have suggested, Ron Pentons Data Structures for Game Programmers is educational and entertaining at the same time.get it.

Also:
http://see.stanford....3a-ca9d470755ee

Best of luck.

b




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