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Unappreciated "Skills" ?


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#1 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1471

Posted 10 November 2012 - 04:43 PM

It is common to brand some on that works certain jobs as being "unskilled", but is that actually true? What "hidden" skills can you think of, for those that work jobs that are considered "unskilled" ?

A good example I have thought of, is a worker at McDonalds. Some one who works there for some time, picks up both Customer Service AND line assembly skills.

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#2 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3133

Posted 10 November 2012 - 06:39 PM

Okay, let's use the McDonalds worker as an example. Some of them go to college with fantastic grade point average in a tough major.

I have another one for you: How about the millions of college graduates working low income jobs or even unemployed (in the United States of America) ?


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#3 tstrimple   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 1718

Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:25 AM

It is common to brand some on that works certain jobs as being "unskilled", but is that actually true? What "hidden" skills can you think of, for those that work jobs that are considered "unskilled" ?

A good example I have thought of, is a worker at McDonalds. Some one who works there for some time, picks up both Customer Service AND line assembly skills.


You don't go to McDonalds because of the cashiers customer service skills. You could have the best customer service cashier in the world working in your McDonalds and it would have very little impact on the income that restaurant generates. You could also replace that expert at customer service with a random person off the street and not see a significant difference in revenue. Compare that to "skilled" jobs. You cannot pick a random person off the street and be able to successfully replace a doctor, lawyer or engineer.

#4 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2289

Posted 12 November 2012 - 02:43 PM

It is common to brand some on that works certain jobs as being "unskilled", but is that actually true? What "hidden" skills can you think of, for those that work jobs that are considered "unskilled" ?

A good example I have thought of, is a worker at McDonalds. Some one who works there for some time, picks up both Customer Service AND line assembly skills.


Customer service (at the level of McDonalds) and line assembly are both good examples of unskilled labour. Both could conceivably be better done by machine. Instead of a human at a counter, you could have a touch screen menu. The food is already prepared and putting it together isn't really that hard.
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#5 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 20191

Posted 12 November 2012 - 02:53 PM

It is common to brand some on that works certain jobs as being "unskilled", but is that actually true?

The term applies to the job, not the worker.

A quick Google search for the definition yields: daily production tasks that do not depend on technical abilities or skills.



Just because the job doesn't depend on them does not mean that the individual worker is lacking skills.
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