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Two Co-Op offers.


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#1 Tocs   Members   -  Reputation: 679

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 12:03 PM

My university has "Co-operative Education" where they send us out to work in industry for a semester or two to gain experience and contacts.

I have received two offers for my next round of co-op

One for a company which does 3D data processing for consumer products. The particular bit of work I'd be doing is working on their application which takes CAD data and then runs physics simulations on it. So they can digitally crush, smash, and throw product designs. I'd be doing a lot of OpenGL and 3D data work, so I think it would still be relevant to my end goal of a job in the game industry.

The other is for the only game studio my university has contacts with. While a game studio, they produce games that I'm not really that excited about (Educational / Promotional games). As well as some of their work looking a little less than easy on the eyes. It would still most likely be a fun place to work and an interesting experience.

So my question is, would it be "better" for me to work at the game studio, or should I go to the simulation job? I'd would enjoy both jobs a lot. But I'm not sure which would help me more towards getting a job at a game studio that produces games I'd be more interested in myself.

Any suggestions would be awesome.

Thanks,
~Tocs

Edited by Tocs1001, 13 November 2012 - 03:05 PM.


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#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10163

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:10 PM

So my question is, would it be "better" for me to work at the game studio, or should I go to the simulation job.


"Better" is subjective. YOU have to be the person to decide which is "better" for YOU. I recommend you make a decision grid.
Your preference should be a factor in your decision (you get to let your "feelings" be part of your decision).
Back out to the Breaking In forum main page and look for the FAQ link at upper right. You'll find information on how to make decisions there.
Also, questions should end with a question mark.
-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 Tocs   Members   -  Reputation: 679

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:21 PM

Now that we have the obligatory RTFM and grammar mistake out of the way...In my attempt to keep my question shorter than a book I suppose I didn't convey my point.


I did in fact read the FAQ page on decisions. Despite working on a decision grid, I wasn't sure how each experience would weigh in on my resume. And thus was unable to complete the grid in its entirety. I was also looking for consequences I might not have thought up.

Things like "If the person reading your resume looks up a studio you worked at and see's their work is kind of lack luster, you'll be less likely to be hired." or "Any kind of previous work at a game studio makes you look like a great candidate." or "The work you do at any studio would help you as a game play programmer, but if you want to be more geared towards engine development the technical work with simulation job might make you more desirable." or "The two jobs are pretty much interchangeable from a resume reader's standpoint, your real substance will be in your portfolio." These notions might be absurd or spot on, I have no idea. Hence, my post inquiring for thoughts about the two job offers.


Perhaps I haven't done enough "internet legwork", but I haven't found much to help me in weighing these potential experiences against each other. I was hoping for some insight in that regard, not a guide to general decision making.

#4 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10163

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:59 PM

I did in fact read the FAQ page on decisions. Despite working on a decision grid, I wasn't sure how each experience would weigh in on my resume. And thus was unable to complete the grid in its entirety.


Okay, now we're getting specific. Good. Which parts of your grid were you having trouble with? It says in the FAQ that when you're stuck, do research on that matter -- and it also says that some of the things you may think are important criteria are actually unknowable. So, rather than getting your claws out, ask us about those problem parts of your grid.

0. I was also looking for consequences I might not have thought up.
Things like
1. "If the person reading your resume looks up a studio you worked at and see's their work is kind of lack luster, you'll be less likely to be hired." or
2. "Any kind of previous work at a game studio makes you look like a great candidate." or
3. "The work you do at any studio would help you as a game play programmer, but if you want to be more geared towards engine development the technical work with simulation job might make you more desirable." or
4. "The two jobs are pretty much interchangeable from a resume reader's standpoint, your real substance will be in your portfolio."
5. These notions might be absurd or spot on, I have no idea. Hence, my post inquiring for thoughts about the two job offers.


0. It's kinda hard to tell you what you haven't thought of. You should just think of what you consider might be pros and cons, then look further into those.
1. No, you don't get judged by the company that kept you. Good people work at poorly run companies. Bad people work at great companies.
2. I wouldn't say that exactly.
3. [Can't respond to that one]
4. Both jobs are conversation starters. The important thing is how you comport yourself in the conversation, and what you say.
5. Not absurd. Just ask focused questions like that.

Edited by Tom Sloper, 13 November 2012 - 11:01 PM.
forgot #5

-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.




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