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Impotant! Books to start learning video game programming ! I need it FAST!


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#21 lride   Members   -  Reputation: 633

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

You will need a lot of time and patience, but after a 5+ years, you should be able to program almost everything you wish (but be aware that the time needed to do it will still be in years).


5+ years, That's ridiculous. I started programming not much older than him and I picked up C++ in a year, a year later I was writing full blown 3d games in C++. My advice is skip C# and spend a while getting to know C++ and you should be able to program almost anything in 2+ years if you work hard.


I totally agree with this. I'm a HS sophomore and taught myself the whole C++ and made my first game over the last summer.
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#22 demonkoryu   Members   -  Reputation: 976

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:06 AM

I taught everything myself the whole about C++ in about a week and have working on AAA titles about 1-2 months later then. That's ridiculous!

Edited by demonkoryu, 22 November 2012 - 02:54 AM.


#23 muratsal   Members   -  Reputation: 141

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:26 AM

all are good i think :)
my map aplications http://haritaaraci.com

#24 LennyLen   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3917

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:17 PM


edit:
To other readers, please don't downvote beginner questions. It frightens them into not wanting to ask questions.


I voted it down since i consider marking topics as "important, urgent, etc" in order to divert attention to it (and away from other questions) to be very rude. His questions are no more important than those posted by other people.


While I agree with your assessment of the original post and thread title, simply downvoting doesn't help new posters understand what they've done wrong. A more constructive approach would be a politely worded response telling them what you found inappropriate about the post, and how it could be improved. A link to How to Ask Smart Questions never hurts either.

If they continue to post in the same manner afterwards, downvote away. ;)

#25 Khatharr   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3030

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:29 PM

So can you say whether this book is good.


If you understand it and are able to learn from it then it's a good book.

When I was first starting out I used textbooks heavily, but these days I use online references and if I want a book I try to get it in eBook format so I can have the actual book onscreen while I'm butchering my code. In my experience its far easier to cuss out the compiler when I have both hands free. (It reacts better when I make the gestures.)

That being said, if you're just starting on a language you should definitely seek out online tutorials before going for a book. This will help you two ways:
  • Is this the language I want? (Am I comfortable with it? Do I understand it easily? Does it 'flow' for me?)
  • If so then is the book/reference I'm looking at good for me/worth my money/download? (...or is it just $30 for the exact same thing I know from tutorials?)

Programming is not a single, established path that every person follows. At the very core, a programmer must be an intellectual trailblazer. A programmer is someone that builds a solution to a problem out of thin air and then expresses that solution through the tools available to them.

Find the road that takes you where you want to go.

Edited by Khatharr, 19 November 2012 - 08:32 PM.

void hurrrrrrrr() {__asm sub [ebp+4],5;}

There are ten kinds of people in this world: those who understand binary and those who don't.

#26 3DModelerMan   Members   -  Reputation: 1022

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 10:17 AM

I learned by reading textbooks. I still read textbooks of course, but I think the most important thing after you've passed the beginner stage is to learn how to read and understand documentation like MSDN and doxygen APIs.

#27 RoyP   Members   -  Reputation: 202

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 10:49 AM

There's a good post over at Game From Scratch with a list of good books for both C++ and C#. I followed it and it helped me get started quickly. Hope it helps.

Roy
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#28 willpowered   Members   -  Reputation: 508

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:05 PM

I need books for learning programming, i leaned Vb myself with just searching the internet. I thought that u could also learn c++ in the same way but i was wrong, thats why i am searching for books. I know that old books have old technologies so i will only buy the books which came this year or last year.


Simply put, you are wrong. You don't specifically need books to learn programming. If you're so set on buying books though, it's not like I'm going to stop you.

#29 Toothpix   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 810

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:12 PM

OMG! I have the same problem as you! I need to design a NASA-class rocket in only 2 months, and I need easy books now! Are there any "For Dummies" books on the subject? They can't be expensive, as my mommy won't buy them for me. You don't need to know any of that fancy math stuff, right? Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image Posted Image I'm not good at math, and I'm only 12 btw. LOLZ. here is my email: soontobespammed@regretit.com

All jokes aside, playing video games can be really fun, and thinking up new ideas can sometimes be funner, especially with a kid's imagination, but creating games isn't always the same, and it definitely isn't quick and easy. It is in no means anything like playing them. The first thing to learn and master, however, is mathematics. It is important to have a very good grasp of AT LEAST Algebra II and also Trigonometry for any type of programming, especially if it relates to 2D or 3D graphics, like in games. If you want to learn programming in this day and age, you are truly blessed with modern easy and powerful tools like C# and Java. If you want to dig into older yet still used languages (DO NOT, you have been warned, kiddo), there is always C++. Overall, you could make a game if you really tried to, and had a natural aptitude for math and problem solving, but I would say it wouldn't be even seriously started for another two years, and it would take you probably a year to finish a simple 2D game. If you really want to make one, you are only a child and have nothing to lose by trying, but it is much funner to just play games. Do you want to spend several summers of your carefree childhood fumbling with a keyboard over memory leaks you don't even understand, or would you rather spend it doing normal things and maybe playing computer games every so often and having enjoying your time?

P.S: I doubt it will be a problem on this site, but never put your age and email online. There are two reasons, number one being the safety reasons you see on TV and at school that you probably ignore, and number two being the fact that if people realize you are only 13, they will troll you, like they troll every other kid on the interwebs. They will also sign you up for pr0n emails, which is never good, and mostly nasty screwed up (no pun intended) stuff.

Edited by MrJoshL, 21 November 2012 - 07:59 PM.

C dominates the world of linear procedural computing, which won't advance. The future lies in MASSIVE parallelism.


#30 Zomboy79   Members   -  Reputation: 92

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 10:57 PM

I'm 13 as well, I am fairly new to this forum, Don't let your age set you back. Many people code for the wrong reasons, don't be one of them and as for learning C# first, I highly suggest you to go straight to C++,many people think its a waste of time and some even think it is an advantage to skip C#, due to the habits it gives you.

#31 Toothpix   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 810

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 09:49 AM

I'm 13 as well, I am fairly new to this forum, Don't let your age set you back. Many people code for the wrong reasons, don't be one of them and as for learning C# first, I highly suggest you to go straight to C++,many people think its a waste of time and some even think it is an advantage to skip C#, due to the habits it gives you.

This is possibly the worst advice on this thread, and some of the worst I have seen. I would like to see Zomboy79's games that he created with C++. How many? 0? And please elaborate on the "bad habits" that C# gives you. It's one thing for an old crusty legacy programmer who is sitting in his basement writing FORTRAN code on his Altair cursing C#, Visual Basic, Java, etc. for being new, flashy, and too easy, but it is entirely different for someone who doesn't know what they are talking about, let alone a little kid. By the way, you "waste" more time with C++ fumbling around with stupid issues like memory leaks and compiler errors then you do with C#.

C dominates the world of linear procedural computing, which won't advance. The future lies in MASSIVE parallelism.


#32 SimonForsman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 6169

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 06:44 AM

You will need a lot of time and patience, but after a 5+ years, you should be able to program almost everything you wish (but be aware that the time needed to do it will still be in years).


5+ years, That's ridiculous. I started programming not much older than him and I picked up C++ in a year, a year later I was writing full blown 3d games in C++. My advice is skip C# and spend a while getting to know C++ and you should be able to program almost anything in 2+ years if you work hard.


I'd advise against skipping anything, especially a language like C# (Which is used almost everywhere today), It is however important to focus on one language to start with, which one isn't all that important. We usually recommend less obnoxious languages than C++ here to beginners but any language works, the important thing is to get started. (Both C# and C++ are worth learning at some point and neither should be skipped)

The big mistake alot of beginners make with C++ is that they think that memory management is the hard part (It isn't, especially not in C++11, unless you start to muck around at a very low level to gain performance but then it isn't the language that is hard (C++ makes writing low level code reasonably easy)). I wrote my first 3D game using C++ and OpenGL without actually knowing C++, i thought i did, but i really didn't (i violated the rule of three(The tutorials i used to teach myself didn't even mention it), abused C functions and constructs, didn't take proper advantage of the C++ standard library, made excessive allocations/deallocations and a whole bunch of other mistakes) and to be perfectly honest, i still don't really know C++ (Atleast these days i'm aware of my lack of knowledge)

The big problems with C++ in my opinion are:

1) Undefined or implementation defined behaviour. This is pretty much a minefield, C++ code that runs fine when built with Compiler X might act differently when compiled with Compiler Y or even a later version of Compiler X, I've used C++ for over 15 years now and still step on those from time to time, one of the moderators used to post a link to some C++ test that is pretty good for checking how well you actually know C++ (I don't know of anyone who has actually aced that test on the first try).

2) The whole C "compatibility" crap(which really isn't all that compatible anymore), while this isn't a big deal for experienced programmers(and might be beneficial in some cases since some of the C library functions and constructs have less overhead than the safer C++ versions) it is a huge problem for those learning how to program, doing things the old C way is extremely error prone and is one of the larger causes of security flaws in todays software and most C++ compilers doesn't even spit out a warning for you when you make those mistakes.

3) The online tutorials are generally pure crap which makes 1 and 2 far bigger problems than they have to be, a good book makes learning C++ properly a lot easier.

Edited by SimonForsman, 23 November 2012 - 07:30 AM.

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