Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Progressive list of games for Intro Programmers to Learn


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
3 replies to this topic

#1 raines883   Members   -  Reputation: 101

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:44 PM

Hello all, first post but have been a long time watcher. Thought I would start being more proactive in the gameDev world. I wanted start start off by saying I'm a college student getting a B.S. in Computer Science, haven't decided which route I'm going to take but either way wanted to give game development a try. So what I'm looking for is a sort of list that grows progressively harder for intro game developers as myself. I heard most people should start with console applications, sorta like how we learn in school, either way I want something I can upload to my website to share. I was planning on learning actionscript since I know c++ pretty well but people say it's mostly limited to 2d and Flash. Eventually I don't want to be limited to just that as I would like to venture into the 3d world. So if anyone has some ideas on a list that gets harder as I learn more I will take anything you got ;-)

Thanks in advance

Sponsor:

#2 KnolanCross   Members   -  Reputation: 1225

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:59 PM

If you know CPP really well, most other languages won't be really hard to learn, so that shouldn't be a problem.
If you already know how to code, I would tell you to go learn some basic engine and try coding some easy examples
Tic-tac-toe is an easy one.
Snake is a good one (you will need to code the movemnt plus map the snake and the limits, this should be a nice challenge).
Pong should be easy too (plus will give you some knowledge on very basic physics, that you will need).
A memory cards game (here add some mouse/sound/images) would be an easy one to learn as well.

After that you should move to some 3D, a simple exploring example is probably enough to give you a good idea of how scenario, collision, lights and so on works).

As for engines, that will depend a lot on you objectives, since I am a hobbiest, I mostly stick with the open source free sdks:
- Pygame (python, 2d)
- Panda3D (python/cpp 3d)
- orx (portable, 2d C)

I heard those are cool too:
- cocos2d (javascript - I believe - mostly IOS)
- play-n (portable, java)

If you are planning to go indy, I believe the vast majority of people use Unity3d.

Well, my 2c, hope it help you.

Edited by KnolanCross, 16 November 2012 - 03:59 PM.

Currently working on a scene editor for ORX (http://orx-project.org), using kivy (http://kivy.org).


#3 Shippou   Members   -  Reputation: 1361

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:09 PM

You want to develop online games?
I am having a bit of a hard time understanding what you are wanting to do with game development - but if you want a progressively hard "to-do" list for development of online type games ...

1: Create a simple text adventure game.
2: Add in combat system of some kind.
3: Create a multi user system.
4: Translate your game to PHP, and upload it to a free PHP hosting site so that others can play your Alpha version
5:Tweek the dynamics of the game, making it more complex.
6: Add simple graphics, and a 2D map.
7: Continue to tweek the game mechanics.
8: Translate the game to HTML5.
9: Continue to improve the game mechanics.
10: Develop a client - server package in your language of choice.
11: Translate your game to the language of your choice ( Beta version )
12: Continue to tweek the mechanics of the game.
13: Once everything is as polished as possible, drop the beta and release the game to the general public

 Reactions To Technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.

- Douglas Adams 2002


 


#4 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1103

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 November 2012 - 02:05 PM

A memory cards game (here add some mouse/sound/images) would be an easy one to learn as well.


I actually have a video tutorial series where I build that exact game, from beginning to end: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDFB7FFF90EE6F0C1

@Shippou

I don't think it's a good idea to try and learn everything on a single game: assuming that you ever reach the "end", you only have one project to show for your entire history.

I would recommend learning new techniques/concepts by developing new games.

+---------------------------------------------------------------------+

| Need a programmer?        ->   http://www.nilunder.com/protoblend   |

| Want to become one?       ->   http://www.nilunder.com/tutoring     |
| Game Dev video tutorials  ->   http://www.youtube.com/goranmilovano |
+---------------------------------------------------------------------+




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS