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particleSystems API


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#1 New User   Members   -  Reputation: 101

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 11:00 PM

Hello,

I am new to these forums and I have a very simple, beginner question.

I am currently trying to set up an example program I found on particleSystems.org so I can learn how to use particles.

The example program is in the 'API and documentation' download shown on the front page of the site.

I have added the necessary include file in project properties, but am not sure what to add for the 'additional libraries'. Usually I just add the 'lib' folder, but I can't find one in the folder. How can I find out what needs to be added to the "include additional libraries" field under project properties? Obviously the program will not work until I do this.

I know this question is very specific, but any help/guidance would be appreciated.

Thanks

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#2 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9266

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 08:26 PM

I downloaded the zip, and, yeah, what a mess. I think you're supposed to build the ParticleLib project yourself, which'll produce a ParticleLib.lib static library which you can use in the examples. Like so:

1>------ Build started: Project: ParticleLib, Configuration: Release Win32 ------
	1>  Actions.cpp
	1>  ActionsAPI.cpp
	1>  OtherAPI.cpp
	1>  PInternalState.cpp
	1>  ParticleLib.vcxproj -> F:\Downloads\Particle221Src\Particle221Src\Particle2\Release\ParticleLib.lib
	========== Build: 1 succeeded, 0 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

If the examples complain about various missing libraries (like TIFF libraries, etc... you can find them in the Goodies/Release_vc80-90 folder depending on your version of MSVC). Or you can download the corresponding projects and build them yourself, but from my experience it's a nightmare trying to build large-scale libraries under Windows with MSVC, especially since most of them were designed with GCC in mind.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis





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