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what is the range of clipping space in OpenGL?


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#1 sobeit   Members   -  Reputation: 440

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:52 PM

I'm a beginner in opengl, and I enounter a problem concering about clipping space.
I calculated perspective matrix myself and passed it to vertex shader, but why triangle was visible only when the z value of vertices multiplied by my perspective matrix is positive? Since the z value range of perspective frustum [n, f] is mapped to [-1. 1] in clipping space, any -1 < z < 1 should not be clipped which is just not the case in my situation. In case that my perspective matrix is miscalculated, I directly passed vertices with -1 < z < 0 to vertex shader, still I got nothing. but it works just fine with 0 < z < 1.

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#2 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1104

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 02:14 PM

From what I understand, near and far represent values that relate to camera space, not clip space.

If you use something like 0 and 100 for n and f respectively, you should be able to see geometry where incoming vertex z is negative.

Can you post the function that calculates the projection matrix, and your vertex shader?

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#3 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 10842

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:15 PM

From what I understand, near and far represent values that relate to camera space, not clip space.

If you use something like 0 and 100 for n and f respectively, you should be able to see geometry where incoming vertex z is negative.

The near-plane value should never be zero, or you will lose an immense amount of precision (remember the depth buffer uses a logarithmic scale). The best values depend on the scale of the scene, but if you're working in meters, 0.1 to 1000 is a good start IMHO.

Edited by Bacterius, 02 December 2012 - 04:15 PM.

“If I understand the standard right it is legal and safe to do this but the resulting value could be anything.”


#4 Goran Milovanovic   Members   -  Reputation: 1104

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 11:44 PM

The near-plane value should never be zero, or you will lose an immense amount of precision (remember the depth buffer uses a logarithmic scale). The best values depend on the scale of the scene, but if you're working in meters, 0.1 to 1000 is a good start IMHO.


Ah, yes, as written here: http://www.opengl.org/archives/resources/faq/technical/depthbuffer.htm

Thanks for pointing that out.

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