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#1 R3DO   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 11:59 PM

Hey everyone. I recently started getting into the coding world and I've had quite some trouble trying to learn and find out which language is best for me. I started coding in Java a year ago, then quit because i just didn't feel lt.. Then i went into Graphics and started learning photoshop and 3D modeling and stuff like that. I've really wanted to learn a language, or languages but i honestly cant... I was wondering if someone could help point me in the right direction. Like, should i keep coding in Java? I honestly don't know what it's used for, and i hear C# and C++ are really good languages to learn, but a little too hard. And i would love some tutorials or even books. Thanks dudes Posted Image By the way, I'm only 13 Posted Image

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#2 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 18609

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:17 AM

Honestly, it doesn't really matter which language you use as long as you pick one and stick with it.

From the sounds of your post the main problem you're having is simply focusing on your learning, and that you don't really understand how what you're learning can actually be used to make a game, and your young age is probably a part of this.


I'd suggest choosing a simpler language where you can get fast and obvious results so that you can see and understand how things are useful and what they do right away. The experience you gain can then be transferred to harder programming languages later if you want to.


I would suggest trying LOVE, which is a simple game programming library that uses the Lua programming language. There is a "getting started" guide as well as some tutorials, a wiki, and discussion forums to get help with LOVE.


Alternatively, if you just want to make some games for now you could try a point & click editor such as Construct 2, Game Maker or RPG Maker to create your games. These editors allow you to much more easily and quickly create games with little or no programming, and will still teach you some basic logic that will help with learning programming if you decide to do so later on.


Hope that helps! Posted Image

#3 najmuddin   Members   -  Reputation: 181

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:23 AM

<BadEnglishAlert> Hi! You are young, and you have a nice path in front of you if you decide to keep working on this... You could start with more basic languages, even web or scripting ones... C/C++ might look really hard if you have no previous knowledge about programming, but there are a lot of good options that have a lot of documentation on the web, like Phyton. There are also tools like Blender that offer the posibility of integrate 3D design with game making...

Don't worry if you don't get it right now... You'll surely learn them later, just never give up if you enjoy this world.... </BadEnglishAlert>

#4 R3DO   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:29 AM

Honestly, it doesn't really matter which language you use as long as you pick one and stick with it.

From the sounds of your post the main problem you're having is simply focusing on your learning, and that you don't really understand how what you're learning can actually be used to make a game, and your young age is probably a part of this.


I'd suggest choosing a simpler language where you can get fast and obvious results so that you can see and understand how things are useful and what they do right away. The experience you gain can then be transferred to harder programming languages later if you want to.


I would suggest trying LOVE, which is a simple game programming library that uses the Lua programming language. There is a "getting started" guide as well as some tutorials, a wiki, and discussion forums to get help with LOVE.


Alternatively, if you just want to make some games for now you could try a point & click editor such as Construct 2, Game Maker or RPG Maker to create your games. These editors allow you to much more easily and quickly create games with little or no programming, and will still teach you some basic logic that will help with learning programming if you decide to do so later on.


Hope that helps! Posted Image


Oh my, thank you so much. That's exactly what I'm having trouble with, not focusing. I'll definitely check those out, thanks again<3

Edited by R3DO, 08 December 2012 - 12:30 AM.


#5 R3DO   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:32 AM

<BadEnglishAlert> Hi! You are young, and you have a nice path in front of you if you decide to keep working on this... You could start with more basic languages, even web or scripting ones... C/C++ might look really hard if you have no previous knowledge about programming, but there are a lot of good options that have a lot of documentation on the web, like Phyton. There are also tools like Blender that offer the posibility of integrate 3D design with game making...

Don't worry if you don't get it right now... You'll surely learn them later, just never give up if you enjoy this world.... </BadEnglishAlert>


Really appreciate the reply, thanks :) And bad english? Lol, understandable to me.

#6 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3156

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 01:02 AM

Small goals are important. You need step by step help such as a good programming book. Find one that explains the reasons why things are done the way they are.

Java is very powerful and capable of allowing someone to make great games, but there are other much better choices for newbies or those struggling in early stages. Python and Lua are very good recommendations given. The C# is a good one, too.

You need explanations and methodical advancement that can best come by the instruction of an expert programmer who has the teaching skills.


Clinton

Edited by 3Ddreamer, 08 December 2012 - 01:03 AM.

Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#7 R3DO   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 01:12 AM

Small goals are important. You need step by step help such as a good programming book. Find one that explains the reasons why things are done the way they are.

Java is very powerful and capable of allowing someone to make great games, but there are other much better choices for newbies or those struggling in early stages. Python and Lua are very good recommendations given. The C# is a good one, too.

You need explanations and methodical advancement that can best come by the instruction of an expert programmer who has the teaching skills.


Clinton


Such big words! Lol, thanks. Looking into Lua and some good books.

#8 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 18609

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 01:56 AM

Looking into Lua and some good books.

The best book available for Lua is probably the second edition of Programming in Lua -- it's not game specific, but it's an excellent explanation of the language written the the chief architect of the language. If you can't afford to purchase the second edition you can find the full text of the first edition available for free online. There have been some changes to the language, and some of the information is out-dated, but the majority of the information is still relevant.

The reference manual is also an excellent resource, and there are some good user-provided tutorials for the language here.

Between those and the documentation for LOVE you should have plenty of information to get started! Posted Image

#9 R3DO   Members   -  Reputation: 102

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 02:03 AM


Looking into Lua and some good books.

The best book available for Lua is probably the second edition of Programming in Lua -- it's not game specific, but it's an excellent explanation of the language written the the chief architect of the language. If you can't afford to purchase the second edition you can find the full text of the first edition available for free online. There have been some changes to the language, and some of the information is out-dated, but the majority of the information is still relevant.

The reference manual is also an excellent resource, and there are some good user-provided tutorials for the language here.

Between those and the documentation for LOVE you should have plenty of information to get started! Posted Image


Woah, thanks again ^.^ I'll probably buy that book with the rest, tons of great programing books for different languages out there. I'll probably grab a few C# and Java books.




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