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What are your predictions about the future of gaming?


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#21 Shaquil   Members   -  Reputation: 819

Posted 18 December 2012 - 07:15 AM

Which reminds me: if the Steambox takes off to the point of even taking over PC, there's risk that the days of PCs as commodity hardware are pretty much over. I mean, phones and tablets took over pretty much almost all of the non-productivity activities these days, leaving games as the only thing that can't be fully migrated. If gamers leave PCs, then that'd mean the only thing left is work stuff, and then PC prices will spike like crazy as they'll be priced expecting them to be bought by businesses. I don't think it'll happen, but it's in a quite dangerous position at the moment.

Also I said my theory was unlikely to happen. In fact, Apple has pretty much managed to prove that both users and developers are willing to give up everything in exchange for convenience. They want the platform holder to take care of everything, even the marketing of the apps! It's pretty obvious technology is going to get even more closed over time. Don't be surprised if we eventually reach the point where even general purpose computing devices end up with the same kind of licensing deals consoles have currently, or even worse.


Haha yeah that is the nightmare scenario. Although I will say that even Steam isn't big enough to kill Desura, GoG, and all the other PC distribution platforms just by leaving the PC. There's also MS Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, which everyone still needs to do on a desktop/laptop. Microsoft wouldn't be dumb enough to force those onto a tablet-only interface.

But even if the worst happens, I built the PC I'm using. If companies start acting stupid about desktops/laptops, we can still just build our own. It'd be more fun that way anyway!

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#22 Shaquil   Members   -  Reputation: 819

Posted 18 December 2012 - 07:27 AM



The MineCrafts of the world are very rare ... I would like to point out similar games ( such as Terraria ) have been a flop.


How was terraia a flop? It sold over a million copies and was only made by 3 people. It only lost popularity because the devs retired while so many game elements were half finished.

I meant to say "dead in the water"


Hate to double post, but I'd also like to mention that while Minecraft did explode and become a huge success beyond all logic and reason, it's still (as far as I know) sold exclusively through minecraft.net, which means there isn't really a distributor, and so all that money is being focused in a singular area. The reason it's a lot bigger when something like Call of Duty makes huge numbers is because Call of Duty is published, and their publisher is a big industry presence, and so it means those Call of Duty sales might affect Activision's ability or desire to work on other projects or do some experimental things, etc. The same would go for a big release on Steam affecting Valve.

If we've learned anything industry-changing from Minecraft, it's that you can be one of the best-selling games in the last decade without needing any real platform other than your own website. I don't think this will encourage true indie game devs though. If anything, it's encouragement for industry devs who might want to quit working at big studios to "go indie". They'll have the connections, experience and team to put together something small but professional, and the clout to draw attention without having to beg for a spot on someone's store. That would be a big deal.

#23 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1637

Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:18 PM

There's also MS Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, which everyone still needs to do on a desktop/laptop. Microsoft wouldn't be dumb enough to force those onto a tablet-only interface.

There are tablet versions of those as far as I know. In any case they'd still be considered productivity applications, i.e. stuff to get work done... but yeah, it's also true some people use Word as if it was Notepad.
Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.

#24 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2299

Posted 18 December 2012 - 06:25 PM


Although games journalists continue to push the idea that "download-only" is going to be the main model in the near future, they fail to see past their own social bias. The fact is, most people who have an internet connection have restrictive caps, and even those without caps don't quite have the reliability to download Fallout 4 on the night of release and be playing in a few hours. This is more and more the case outside of countries like America, Japan and the UK, where gamers are most concentrated, but it is still a great limitation. But even in these three major countries, most people just can't be arsed to download a 20 gig game.

QFT! Over here in NZ, with most internet plans available we simply cannot afford to download a 20 gigabyte game in one go. 20GB is a third of my family's monthly cap, and trust me - you do not want to go over the cap. I heard Australia is even worse.


And yet people do. I live in NZ and I haven't bought a game in years that wasn't on steam. Hell, my ISP hosts their own steam content node and doesn't meter me for steam bandwidth.

And the situation will only improve. If MS or Sony move their consoles to a download model (and the economic benefits for them are both obvious and huge), you will see deals with ISPs worldwide to unmeter whatever XBLA and PSN become.

Download is the future.
if you think programming is like sex, you probably haven't done much of either.-------------- - capn_midnight

#25 shuma-gorath   Members   -  Reputation: 887

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:16 PM

Mind-controlled games
Usually when we talk about "next gen," there's usually some new technology that wasn't feasible in the previous generation. Now, while mind-control peripherals for games aren't new, they never had to chance to flourish. The demos and hardware I've seen from Emotiv suggest that we're on the brink of something incredible. Off the bat, three game genres that I could see benefiting the most from this tech are puzzle games, JRPGs, and 2D fighters. Eventually, non-traditional gamers might start taking a liking to this form of gaming.

Cloud-based games
I'm interested cloud-based gaming for one reason: To make up for the lack of backwards compatibility on consoles.

#26 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1637

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:31 PM

Mind-controlled games
Usually when we talk about "next gen," there's usually some new technology that wasn't feasible in the previous generation. Now, while mind-control peripherals for games aren't new, they never had to chance to flourish. The demos and hardware I've seen from Emotiv suggest that we're on the brink of something incredible. Off the bat, three game genres that I could see benefiting the most from this tech are puzzle games, JRPGs, and 2D fighters. Eventually, non-traditional gamers might start taking a liking to this form of gaming.

Also don't forget those who have disabilities or can't move fast enough, even though they can technically react quickly (i.e. the brain does). In extreme cases it could become the only way to play a lot of games. Eventually it could be considered like the ultimate controller if the technology is advanced enough, since everything you need to do is to have your brain want to do an action, and it wouldn't be restricted by any kind of physical limitation.
Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.

#27 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3703

Posted 20 December 2012 - 05:43 PM


Mind-controlled games
Usually when we talk about "next gen," there's usually some new technology that wasn't feasible in the previous generation. Now, while mind-control peripherals for games aren't new, they never had to chance to flourish. The demos and hardware I've seen from Emotiv suggest that we're on the brink of something incredible. Off the bat, three game genres that I could see benefiting the most from this tech are puzzle games, JRPGs, and 2D fighters. Eventually, non-traditional gamers might start taking a liking to this form of gaming.

Also don't forget those who have disabilities or can't move fast enough, even though they can technically react quickly (i.e. the brain does). In extreme cases it could become the only way to play a lot of games. Eventually it could be considered like the ultimate controller if the technology is advanced enough, since everything you need to do is to have your brain want to do an action, and it wouldn't be restricted by any kind of physical limitation.


I couldn't even begin to imagine the complexity involved with programming games that react to our intent of an action, rather than to a standard set of inputs.
Check out https://www.facebook.com/LiquidGames for some great games made by me on the Playstation Mobile market.

#28 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4187

Posted 21 December 2012 - 04:02 AM

cin >> intent;

 

:D


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

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#29 Anastas   Members   -  Reputation: 247

Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:08 AM

Oh God, it's like peering into four-dimensional space. I can't even- *brainsplosion*

 

 

Say, I wonder if 4D games'll ever be a thing.



#30 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8693

Posted 21 December 2012 - 05:23 AM

Oh God, it's like peering into four-dimensional space. I can't even- *brainsplosion*

 

 

Say, I wonder if 4D games'll ever be a thing.

 

----

 

I don't know.. 4D maze games are fun and all but it's rather difficult for us humans to conceptualise the fourth dimension with our puny minds. I don't think it's going mainstream anytime soon. The Portal games were kind of in the same vein, though, with a limited fourth dimension (dimension as in degree of freedom), but I don't think that's what you were thinking about.

 

On the other hand, I would enjoy seeing the temporal dimension (time) being exploited a little more in future games. Currently we make very little use of it and just let it flow at a constant speed (just like in real life) with the occasional "bullet time" slow motion effect, that kind of stuff.. but it would be interesting to experiment with interactive nonlinear time to see how players respond to it. It already kind of exists in arcade games, but I don't see it often outside scripted events in shooters for instance.


Edited by Bacterius, 21 December 2012 - 05:23 AM.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#31 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3703

Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:44 AM

Oh God, it's like peering into four-dimensional space. I can't even- *brainsplosion*

 

 

Say, I wonder if 4D games'll ever be a thing.

 

----

 

I don't know.. 4D maze games are fun and all but it's rather difficult for us humans to conceptualise the fourth dimension with our puny minds. I don't think it's going mainstream anytime soon. The Portal games were kind of in the same vein, though, with a limited fourth dimension (dimension as in degree of freedom), but I don't think that's what you were thinking about.

 

On the other hand, I would enjoy seeing the temporal dimension (time) being exploited a little more in future games. Currently we make very little use of it and just let it flow at a constant speed (just like in real life) with the occasional "bullet time" slow motion effect, that kind of stuff.. but it would be interesting to experiment with interactive nonlinear time to see how players respond to it. It already kind of exists in arcade games, but I don't see it often outside scripted events in shooters for instance.

their was a game for the 360 that heavily featured reversing/pausing time, it was a pretty decent game imo, but it's name slips my mind.


Edited by slicer4ever, 21 December 2012 - 06:49 AM.

Check out https://www.facebook.com/LiquidGames for some great games made by me on the Playstation Mobile market.

#32 Shaquil   Members   -  Reputation: 819

Posted 21 December 2012 - 07:43 AM

Oh God, it's like peering into four-dimensional space. I can't even- *brainsplosion*

 

 

Say, I wonder if 4D games'll ever be a thing.

 

----

 

I don't know.. 4D maze games are fun and all but it's rather difficult for us humans to conceptualise the fourth dimension with our puny minds. I don't think it's going mainstream anytime soon. The Portal games were kind of in the same vein, though, with a limited fourth dimension (dimension as in degree of freedom), but I don't think that's what you were thinking about.

 

On the other hand, I would enjoy seeing the temporal dimension (time) being exploited a little more in future games. Currently we make very little use of it and just let it flow at a constant speed (just like in real life) with the occasional "bullet time" slow motion effect, that kind of stuff.. but it would be interesting to experiment with interactive nonlinear time to see how players respond to it. It already kind of exists in arcade games, but I don't see it often outside scripted events in shooters for instance.

their was a game for the 360 that heavily featured reversing/pausing time, it was a pretty decent game imo, but it's name slips my mind.

 

Blinx the Time Sweeper...? : (

 

I dunno about mind-controlled games. That'd turn a lot of RPG's into interactive hentai real quick.



#33 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3703

Posted 21 December 2012 - 07:55 AM

Oh God, it's like peering into four-dimensional space. I can't even- *brainsplosion*

 

 

Say, I wonder if 4D games'll ever be a thing.

 

----

 

I don't know.. 4D maze games are fun and all but it's rather difficult for us humans to conceptualise the fourth dimension with our puny minds. I don't think it's going mainstream anytime soon. The Portal games were kind of in the same vein, though, with a limited fourth dimension (dimension as in degree of freedom), but I don't think that's what you were thinking about.

 

On the other hand, I would enjoy seeing the temporal dimension (time) being exploited a little more in future games. Currently we make very little use of it and just let it flow at a constant speed (just like in real life) with the occasional "bullet time" slow motion effect, that kind of stuff.. but it would be interesting to experiment with interactive nonlinear time to see how players respond to it. It already kind of exists in arcade games, but I don't see it often outside scripted events in shooters for instance.

their was a game for the 360 that heavily featured reversing/pausing time, it was a pretty decent game imo, but it's name slips my mind.

 

Blinx the Time Sweeper...? : (

 

I dunno about mind-controlled games. That'd turn a lot of RPG's into interactive hentai real quick.

found it, TimeShift did the time control mechanic very well imo.

 

 

cin >> intent;

 

biggrin.png

o, come on, we both know that it isn't that simple, and even if we managed to translate mental thoughts into words, then those words would have to align with some action in the game, how often do you plan games like zork that say "i don't understand your action"


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#34 Anri   Members   -  Reputation: 597

Posted 27 December 2012 - 03:07 PM

I believe we will see a return to Virtual Reality, Holograms and a stronger focus on AI.

 

I also see a greater effort to archive and preserve computer games. Copyright and ownership will no doubt cause a lot of headaches, but maybe an industry effort might flourish...

 

FIFA 2017 will no doubt storm to the #1 spot in the gaming charts...in 2017.

 

And Kirby will finally(and of course, rightfully) be acknowledged as the second coming of Christ. ^_^



#35 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 703

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:22 AM

I think...

 

- If microsoft holds onto removing the start menu then Windows 8/Blue will never sell as well as windows XP/7 did on desktop PC's (including the loss in growth on desktops) and the Valve's focus on the Linux change for steam probably wont work (at-least for the next few years).

 

- Indie games will still be increasing in popularity.

 

- Better NPC AI (this might be further in the future though).


Edited by Xanather, 30 December 2012 - 03:24 AM.


#36 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3703

Posted 30 December 2012 - 02:43 AM

I think...

 

- If microsoft holds onto removing the start menu then Windows 8/Blue will never sell as well as windows XP/7 did on desktop PC's (including the loss in growth on desktops) and the Valve's focus on the Linux change for steam probably wont work (at-least for the next few years).

 

- Indie games will still be increasing in popularity.

 

- Better NPC AI due to significant breakthroughs in AI (this might be further in the future though).

 

the only 1 i question is the last, do you have some basis for why you think AI is due for a "significant breakthrough"?


Edited by slicer4ever, 30 December 2012 - 02:43 AM.

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#37 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1637

Posted 30 December 2012 - 03:14 AM

- If microsoft holds onto removing the start menu then Windows 8/Blue will never sell as well as windows XP/7 did on desktop PC's (including the loss in growth on desktops) and the Valve's focus on the Linux change for steam probably wont work (at-least for the next few years).

Huh, any reason why a lack of start menu would be bad? They could come up with something better in the future, you know (then again, as long as I can access programs by just pressing a few keys on the keyboard I'm happy).

 

I wouldn't bet so much on the Valve one, though. Sure, with things as-is I see it unlikely that will ever change, but there's always the possibility of some killer app coming out of nowhere and taking everybody by surprise. But of course, good luck predicting that, it's the very kind of thing that tends to break predictions =P


Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.

#38 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 703

Posted 30 December 2012 - 03:29 AM

I think...

 

- If microsoft holds onto removing the start menu then Windows 8/Blue will never sell as well as windows XP/7 did on desktop PC's (including the loss in growth on desktops) and the Valve's focus on the Linux change for steam probably wont work (at-least for the next few years).

 

- Indie games will still be increasing in popularity.

 

- Better NPC AI due to significant breakthroughs in AI (this might be further in the future though).

 

the only 1 i question is the last, do you have some basis for why you think AI is due for a "significant breakthrough"?

 

I edit it, after re-reading it, it did sounds a little funny. Something will probably happen to AI in the future and will probably affect game AI so I just put it there

- If microsoft holds onto removing the start menu then Windows 8/Blue will never sell as well as windows XP/7 did on desktop PC's (including the loss in growth on desktops) and the Valve's focus on the Linux change for steam probably wont work (at-least for the next few years).

Huh, any reason why a lack of start menu would be bad? They could come up with something better in the future, you know (then again, as long as I can access programs by just pressing a few keys on the keyboard I'm happy).

 

I wouldn't bet so much on the Valve one, though. Sure, with things as-is I see it unlikely that will ever change, but there's always the possibility of some killer app coming out of nowhere and taking everybody by surprise. But of course, good luck predicting that, it's the very kind of thing that tends to break predictions =P

Maybe if they changed the start menu a bit it might be better, but right now I just cant ever see myself using the new start menu/metro UI on windows 8 at all (just stick in desktop mode).


Edited by Xanather, 30 December 2012 - 03:29 AM.





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