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A Paranoid Programmer


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#1 Programmer Rami   Members   -  Reputation: 193

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:00 AM

hey awesome community of gamedev,
I'm really sick and I can't stop thinking. I want to be the best game programmer ever and I want to learn everything. ofc no one will learn everything so I want to learn most of the things.

I want to be good with engines like unity and I want to be good in making engines, I want to be good in both hardware and software and I want to have acceptiple skills in 3Ds max and character animation. I want to master C++ and I want to be good in C#. I want to create my dream game in Unity after I finish my current project and also I want to make my own 2D engine ( maybe 3D engine later).

the thing is.. I feel it's not enough.. when I uae unity I feel that am not a good game programmer and I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL. I'm really lost I can't concentrate on one path at each time one day I work on my 2D engine with OpenGL and SDL and other day I work on my other project in Unity and the other day I do some 3Ds max modeling am really lost.. I just felt like letting all out with ppl like me.. thanks for lsitening.

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#2 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14236

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:00 AM

hey awesome community of gamedev,

I know this excludes me, but Hello anyway.


I'm really sick and I can't stop thinking. I want to be the best game programmer ever and I want to learn everything. ofc no one will learn everything so I want to learn most of the things.

I suggest using 禁術 (forbidden jutsu) to steal bodies and become immortal like Orochimaru.

I want…
I want…
I want…

Then do, do, and do.


the thing is.. I feel it's not enough.. when I uae unity I feel that am not a good game programmer and I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL.

Now I am lost.
You want to be good with Unity3D but you don’t want to do Unity3D programming because you think it is not enough?
How else are you planning to get good at it?

I can’t understand this line of thinking. It is obvious that if you plan to do many things, you have to start somewhere, which generally means doing them one—maybe two—at a time.
In other words, the obvious line of thought is, “I want to be good at Unity3D and at OpenGL games, so I will do Unity3D today, and although I think it is not enough that really doesn’t matter because I will do OpenGL tomorrow.”



I'm really lost I can't concentrate on one path at each time one day I work on my 2D engine with OpenGL and SDL and other day I work on my other project in Unity and the other day I do some 3Ds max modeling am really lost.. I just felt like letting all out with ppl like me.. thanks for lsitening.

Again I don’t understand the problem here.
I make music, draw pictures, program game engines, write books, act on Japanese TV/movies, and more.
One day I want to practice piano. One day I want to work on my book. One day I want to work on my game engine.
Even if I am working on my engine:
-> One day I want to work on graphics.
-> One day I want to work on physics.
-> One day I want to work on utilities/optimizations.
I told my Japanese teacher, “This time I want to study Kanji.” Then I told her, “No, today I want to study vocabulary.”


I am struggling to see your problem here.


One day you want to work with Unity3D. One day you want to model in 3ds Max. One day you want to work on OpenGL. If you want to learn many things or keep things interesting by mixing them up, isn’t this what you should be doing?
So where is the problem?


L. Spiro

Edited by L. Spiro, 17 December 2012 - 08:01 AM.

It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
L. Spiro Engine: http://lspiroengine.com
L. Spiro Engine Forums: http://lspiroengine.com/forums

#3 rnlf   Members   -  Reputation: 1185

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:04 AM

The most important thing about being a programmer is "getting things done". You will earn credibility iff you get things done. It can be quite a lot of fun to design your own engine and writing the best possible code around this design for years, but unless you produce a real game with it, it is worth nothing.

That being said, it is quite an advantage if you still try to write the best code possible, if you keep in mind, that you have to get finished some day. Sometimes a (well considered) hack will save you weeks of work. If you make sure not to hurt the rest of your code with this hack, it's in my opinion absolutely okay to use it.

Also "professionals" are not writing their engines from scratch. There are TEAMS of engine developers who create the engine which a TEAM of game programmers uses. Would you say the team of game programmers do not do real "game programming" just because they didn't write the engine themselves?

In fact, it is a sign of a good engineer that he does not re-invent everything. If every car designer had to re-invent the wheel, we would still drive around in horse carriages.

my blog (German)


#4 SnakeMaster   Members   -  Reputation: 192

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:05 AM

Well i can't tell you that you will Master everything. But i wish to know, do you even have experience in any Programming language or have Graphical skills? I mean if you did, you could start from that language and keep evolving and so on. I can tell you i started out like you. I was so excited to make games, and though it was so easy, etc. But now at my second Year at my school as Applikationsdeveloper. I noticed it isn't so easy at all. I have to learn alot of languages like, C++, Java, Php, and so on. And i still didn't start anything with gameprogramming. Sadly to say you have to learn something first before you even start. My advice is: Grab a Book about Games programming(No Graphical based books.) that is mostly based on DOS. If you don't wanna start small then grab a book about DirectX and start learning that. You just need to keep in mind you have to have enough programming skills to understand the book.

#5 Morphex   Members   -  Reputation: 298

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:24 AM

I am not sure if troll or not, but here are my 2 cents.

Start small, get things done.Period.

You can not learn everything, and if you feel unity is not good enough why learn it in the first place?
As L.Spiro said, there are two co-working sides of game development, Engine Programmers and Game Programmers. These are two very different subjects and I think you should choose which one you are best suited, feel more appropriate for you.

I am not saying that you have to stick with that choice, but if you try to do everything, you won't be a "master" at anything.
My major advice to you is, create a simple game. By this I mean, write everything from scratch the "engine", the game logic, everything. This way you will find out your true aspiration and what you have more fun doing. Then if you enjoy coding the logic, by all means go for a engine (Unity, Unreal, Crytek), if not start writting your engine. But be warned this is not a trivial task.

IMO, I think that you are very confused in what a Game Engine / Game itself is, and I advise you to read about it.

Check out my new blog: Morphexe 


#6 landagen   Members   -  Reputation: 376

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:18 AM

I have a similar problem as you. I cannot stay focused on one thing for too long. There are so many aspects about making a game that I want to do that I have trouble staying on one topic. It is okay to move back and forth. No one expects you to master unity from start to finish without temporarily moving onto another subject such as learning blender or 3ds max. What you need to do is set goals. Not just say them out loud, but write them down. Put them as an image on your desktop or something so you see them all the time. It should be goals that are big enough to be a good stopping point and to have a sense of accomplishment, but small enough to keep you focused until it is done. Then reward yourself by switching to the next thing you want to learn. All of the things you mentioned will make you a better game maker in the end.

At the same time you need to evaluate what you are really trying to accomplish. Do you want to be a jack of all trades game developer or do you want to make a game? What is your primary focus? What drives you? Either way, make tasks into sizes that fit you. Maybe have tasks that work towards learning unity and then have some tasks that work towards being a better modeler and some other ones that support making a 2d game engine. Then pick a task and complete it. Then pick another task, either from the same group or from a different group if you need something different. The key is to make a task and to complete it.



#7 Arthur Souza   Members   -  Reputation: 1419

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:28 AM

Less mental breakdowns, more work.
Start small, complete a game. Make it a little bigger and repeat.

A.

Lotus - Action RPG In development http://www.gamedev.n...die-rpg-engine/ |
Personal blog In Portuguese: lotuzgames.wordpress.com |


#8 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 12:27 PM

and I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL

I think you're confusing "professionals" with "condescending a**holes". The only times you'll take flak for not having programmed everything from scratch yourself is when you're talking to an insecure, overly critical programmer, or if you're boasting about skills you don't have. So throw that fear out right now.

Programming is programming. If you write code in any language that instructs software or hardware to behave in a certain way, you've programmed something. If that behaviour results in something people can play, you've done some game programming.

There are professionals who are tasked solely (or mostly) with writing scripts that their company's in-house engine uses. Did they program the engine itself? Probably not. Are they still required to think like a programmer and provide instructions to the machine? Yes.
Hazard Pay :: FPS/RTS in SharpDX
DeviantArt :: Because right-brain needs love too

#9 Cdrandin   Members   -  Reputation: 443

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 01:04 PM

I have had the same problem as you and it's understandable.

The thing is here is my personal goal once I am done with finals.
Side note: I want to learn as much about 3D graphics as I can, so I am stuck in the fork to by career. I don't know if i want to create engines or create the game it self with the logic.

SO, over my 5 week break I will be creating a 3D platformer with an orthogonal camera view since these types of games has always strike me as fun. Along with that I am also going to read http://www.amazon.co...d/dp/0132545233 and http://www.amazon.co...ete 4th edition

I personally cannot recommend if they are good books are not, but they have gotten fantastic reviews, I know the rating on Amazon don't show it, but higher level educators find the books to be great.

So, this is how I want to set me goal for this winter break. Funny thing is what if I like both making a game and creating an engine? I guess I am going to have to make more room to get the best of both worlds then, because as an independent developer it is good to be as diverse as possible.
Btw, I will be using Unity to create my game, which I have been looking over and trust me there are a LOT of tutorials out their.

Here are some if you just want a place to get started:
http://www.youtube.c...149339D08B89FF8
http://www.burgzergarcade.com/
http://cgcookie.com/unity/
http://forum.unity3d...ng-Course-(FREE)-Walker-Boys
http://video.unity3d...49856/tutorials
http://www.lynda.com...ng/96677-2.html (not sure if you can use this or not, this is included with my schools tuition)
http://wiki.unity3d....x.php/Tutorials

These are enough tutorials to get you busy for months, but don't do all of them. Just find what you are interested in and learn from it and then expand your learning.

If you ever have any question, research before you post, check out http://answers.unity3d.com/index.html

Remember have fun with it all.

I suggest using 禁術 (forbidden jutsu) to steal bodies and become immortal like Orochimaru.

Or if you are lucky enough to be related to Hidan :P

Edited by Cdrandin, 17 December 2012 - 01:12 PM.


#10 minibutmany   Members   -  Reputation: 1676

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL

Wait...what?
You could make a video game any way you want to, and as long as that method allows you to create your dream end product it doesn't matter how you got there. Plenty of professional and semi-professional studios use unity. Unless you want to take it up as a project for fun, you should never "need" to make your own engine. The people at OpenGL already did that for us.
Stay gold, Pony Boy.

#11 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2132

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 04:47 PM


I really think that professionals wouldn't call it game programming unless I make my own engine starting from OpenGL

Wait...what?
You could make a video game any way you want to, and as long as that method allows you to create your dream end product it doesn't matter how you got there. Plenty of professional and semi-professional studios use unity. Unless you want to take it up as a project for fun, you should never "need" to make your own engine. The people at OpenGL already did that for us.


Yes, this is misleading. People use middlewares, that's why there's Unity, CryEngine, Unreal, Ogre 3D, and all that so you don't have to always start from scratch, even among pros.

It takes time to master multiple skills. To make a nerdy analogy, a fighter-mage combo requires more time to level up than a straight-up fighter or mage.

#12 Toothpix   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 810

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 05:14 PM

So tell me, why are you spending time on GDnet? Shouldn't you be working? It would seem you have a lot to do, but your work ethic is your own business...

C dominates the world of linear procedural computing, which won't advance. The future lies in MASSIVE parallelism.


#13 Blackarch   Members   -  Reputation: 625

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 11:40 PM

If you want to be a great software engineer then get to work -- it is really as simple as that. So go do exactly that, work.

Software Engineer | Credited Titles: League of Legends, Hearthstone


#14 nesseggman   Members   -  Reputation: 366

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:22 AM

I think I have a good analogy for using someone else's engine to make a game. Using Unity to make a game is like using paint and paintbrushes to make a painting. No one would say that a painter is any less of an artist or his painting is not as professional because he did not gather ingredients to make his own paint, make his own paintbrush out of fibers and wood, and make his own canvas, and stuff like that. A game engine is just a tool that is available to make a game with. If you really want to game "from scratch" and not use anything someone else made, you have to invent your own kind of computer, make your own programming language, etc. A programming language is already essentially like an "engine" for machine code.

#15 Anri   Members   -  Reputation: 597

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 03:07 PM

My friend, you will end up burning yourself out. Bottom line is that you expect FAR too much of yourself.

Do yourself a favour and understand that its not how many different things you know, but the quality of each one. Yes, of course, its good to have more than one bow to your string, but an extra bow isn't much use if you don't know it that well...

To become a good games programmer requires three things...
  • A good knowledge of your chosen language
  • Software development
  • Maths
...those three skills should be your primary concern. The rest will come naturally...

Edited by Anri, 18 December 2012 - 03:08 PM.


#16 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1833

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 03:48 PM

Want to become a good programmer? Then get the skill to be able to learn whatever gets thrown at you. Now that will be useful, and in the long term it may become as practical (or even moreso) than knowing everything.
Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.




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