Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


How to distribute a game without being accused of distributing a virus.


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
4 replies to this topic

#1 black_darkness   Members   -  Reputation: 280

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:41 AM

Is there any way of writing a game in c++ and distributing it without anti-virus software accusing it of being a virus? I wanted my friend to play the game I made and he said that his computer wouldn't let him open the file. It prevented him with this message -> "Your internet security settings prevented one or more files from being opened." He didn't know which virus protection he had.

Is compiling and distributing a .exe file with the game on it a bad idea? What is the best way to distribute a game?

He doesn't have a compiler or the motivation to install allegro to compile it himself.


P.S. Sorry that the topic title is worded properly. I should have named the topic "How do I distribute a game without being accused of distributing a virus?".

Edited by black_darkness, 18 December 2012 - 04:46 AM.


Sponsor:

#2 darkhaven3   Members   -  Reputation: 160

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 18 December 2012 - 04:51 AM

He's probably getting that message just because of the fact that his browser is seeing an executable, regardless of its contents. The best way to ensure that you're not going to be accused of distributing a virus is not to change your language or anything of that nature.

It might not be the best way, but it's at least probably good practice to have the MD5 checksum of the file you're distributing readily available to be checked against an MD5 tool's output so that there is no confusion as to whether a third party is tampering with your file. Even better if you have the sourcecode available so that particularly skeptical users are free to compile it on their own if they wish.

#3 Endurion   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3328

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:10 AM

.exe files are often blocked from direct access via email or browser. Best to put it in a zipped archive.
Also, some virus scanners are overly picky about self-decompressing executable files (Mole Box Runtime packer for example)
Fruny: Ftagn! Ia! Ia! std::time_put_byname! Mglui naflftagn std::codecvt eY'ha-nthlei!,char,mbstate_t>

#4 6677   Members   -  Reputation: 1058

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 18 December 2012 - 01:27 PM

It is just trying to tell the user that a .exe file can potentially be harmful. There isnt a way around it. I think your friend just might not be as computer savvy as you and might have been scared by it. There might be an ignore button of some sort.

Chances are if he goes off to get the windows 8 update checker from microsoft themselves his computer might throw a wobbly at it too. It probably isn't discriminating against individual files, just anything which is a .exe.

Publishing source code is often one way to assure the public that it is not malware.

#5 Firestryke31   Members   -  Reputation: 350

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 19 December 2012 - 03:05 PM

You might also consider getting a certificate with which you can sign the executable if you're planning on ever selling anything. IIRC you can use it for signing as much as you want, but be sure to keep it safe so others can't sign stuff as you. Don't ask me about details though, I've never gotten far enough to be worth getting one.




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS