Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


Simplifying game character


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
7 replies to this topic

#1 RobeeZ   Members   -  Reputation: 206

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 20 December 2012 - 01:36 AM

Hi!

I'm currently have an idea about a game, but my problem is with my artist skills. I don't know whether I should make the game with placeholders, and recruit an artist to make the assets, while I finish the game, or simplify the characters that I can make graphics for it (like a character made of boxes, or I don't know)

Sponsor:

#2 Exoaria   Members   -  Reputation: 167

Like
1Likes
Like

Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:41 AM

Unless you're looking to go down the path of Minecraft I wouldn't consider any of those routes an effective one for something you're taking seriously.

If you really had that kind of juice behind you (placeholders, artist hire) then I wouldn't assume it would be going into the game ideas section in the first place. But if you're convinced that this would be some kind of solution then it sounds like you've already got your answer and the most rational conclusion.

There aren't many other paths you can take without $$$.

#3 Poigahn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 520

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 20 December 2012 - 08:43 AM

RoBeez - Depending on what type of game you are creating, you could run an internet search for animated sprites. There are many of them out there.
Some free - Just credit the artist in your game credits. Some for a small fee. This should get you started.

Your Brain contains the Best Program Ever Written : Manage Your Data Wisely !!


#4 Paul Franzen   Members   -  Reputation: 334

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:14 AM

IMO there's nothing wrong with getting a framework in place, with placeholder art, and then contacting an artist later on, after you've made significant headway. No need to get someone else involved until you're sure that 1) the project will work out, and 2) you'll stay motivated to see it through to completion.

Life in the Dorms -- comedic point-and-click adventure game out now for Xbox Live Indie Games!

My portfolio: http://paulfranzen.wordpress.com/


#5 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

Like
2Likes
Like

Posted 20 December 2012 - 11:06 AM

It's perfectly fine to start out with placeholders. Just use boxes and spheres and implement your program logic until you are happy with it. Then you will actually know what art assets you need.

#6 3Ddreamer   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3160

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 22 December 2012 - 11:03 PM

Make fully functional placeholders.  Work on your own art skills and anticipate finding an artist to help you.  This strategy will give you the most return for the effort in the long term.


Personal life and your private thoughts always effect your career. Research is the intellectual backbone of game development and the first order. Version Control is crucial for full management of applications and software.  The better the workflow pipeline, then the greater the potential output for a quality game.  Completing projects is the last but finest order.

 

by Clinton, 3Ddreamer


#7 PyrZern   Members   -  Reputation: 292

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 24 December 2012 - 02:21 PM

IMO, it's best to use mock-up placeholder graphic assets in the beginning. Make a playable alpha with skeletal graphic, then you can get more ppl to help you out.

Depends on what kinda games you're making, there are tons of character sprites out there. If it's RPG Medieval style, I love using Ragnarok Online sprites as placeholder.



#8 DaveTroyer   Members   -  Reputation: 1052

Like
0Likes
Like

Posted 26 December 2012 - 03:22 PM

@Exoaria - Totally, completely disagree with you there.

 

You know the game "Braid"?

 

It's prototype was first made with sloppy, quick graphics. Most of the levels designed in the prototype were also used in the final product, just with new sprites to make it pretty.

 

A lot of studios even use place holder art while they are working on the final game. Actually, I can't think of any that hasn't used place holder art at some point or another. Take "Comic Jumper" by Twisted Pixel. They had place holder art for the characters, backgrounds, and other assets in there while they worked on the mechanics, flow, and gameplay functions. Double Fine, Bethesda, Epic Games, Valve, Blizzard. Yeah, they all use place holder art from one time to another.

 

Use placeholders when building up a game. Its just smart.

 

I've said it in other conversations, and I'll say it here. If a game isn't fun being played with just cubes, than the game isn't fun and that means it isn't worth making.

 

Why waste time and money adding fancy graphics to something when you don't know if it's fun?


Check out my game blog - Dave's Game Blog





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS