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Where to go to learn 3D modeling...complete beginner


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#21 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3551

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 11:48 AM

Don't ever use .blend files with Unity. Every time you edit and save your .blend file, Unity responds by making a mess of everything. Export your blender files to fbx, and then put those in the Unity folder to be imported.

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#22 Benderwiz   Members   -  Reputation: 162

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:45 PM

Free!

 

Absolute Beginners Blender 3D tutorials

 

I watched some of his videos and recommend watching doing these tutorials before buying a book.

 

These tutorials will get you used to the interface and viewing in 3D space.



#23 kibikichu   Members   -  Reputation: 109

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 11:04 PM

I would go Google the new Boston (sorry I don't have the link at the moment) the tutorials start from very very begging and is easy to understand. The site also has courses set up too,with projects and etc. It was sooooo helpful

#24 EddieV223   Members   -  Reputation: 1404

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:49 PM

Check out www.3dbuzz.com


If this post or signature was helpful and/or constructive please give rep.

 

// C++ Video tutorials

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo60USYV9Ik

 

// Easy to learn 2D Game Library c++

SFML2.1 Download http://www.sfml-dev.org/download.php

SFML2.1 Tutorials http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/2.1/

 

// SFML 2 book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1849696845/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1849696845&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 


#25 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5261

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 01:17 PM

I've never been a huge fan of a lot of the Blender tutorials, as I don't really like video, and the best tutorials are video tutorials, or outdated.

 

So ive been slowly putting together a series of tutorials with a basic premise.  I assume my audience is a programmer with zero prior experience with blender.  Each tutorial is entirely static, with the exception of animated images ( no video ).  Each concludes with a reference table of the shortcuts used in the tutorial.  

 

The end goal of the series is to have a tutorial that covers each area ( modelling, animating, texturing, rendering ).  It teaches only HOW, not technique... thats a subject for other more artistic minded people; and something for experience to teach you.

 

Right now though, I've only go through 3/4 of the modelling section, hope you find these useful, if nothing else, they are somewhat unique! ;)

 

 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 1: Introduction 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 2: Selection and Navigation

Blender for Programmers -- Part 3: Introduction to 3D modelling

 

 

Then a somewhat related post I made earlier that is going to be incorporated into the above soon:

BMesh in Action: What's so special about ngons anyway?



#26 jwezorek   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1770

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:29 AM

I've never been a huge fan of a lot of the Blender tutorials, as I don't really like video, and the best tutorials are video tutorials, or outdated.

 

So ive been slowly putting together a series of tutorials with a basic premise.  I assume my audience is a programmer with zero prior experience with blender.  Each tutorial is entirely static, with the exception of animated images ( no video ).  Each concludes with a reference table of the shortcuts used in the tutorial.  

 

The end goal of the series is to have a tutorial that covers each area ( modelling, animating, texturing, rendering ).  It teaches only HOW, not technique... thats a subject for other more artistic minded people; and something for experience to teach you.

 

Right now though, I've only go through 3/4 of the modelling section, hope you find these useful, if nothing else, they are somewhat unique! ;)

 

 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 1: Introduction 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 2: Selection and Navigation

Blender for Programmers -- Part 3: Introduction to 3D modelling

 

 

Then a somewhat related post I made earlier that is going to be incorporated into the above soon:

BMesh in Action: What's so special about ngons anyway?

 

Haven't had time to read through your tutorials, but I'd like to thank you for doing this. I had the exact thought that someone should write a book (or tutorial series) called "Blender for Programmers".

 

One thing that you should really cover is the Python interface. Basically when I can't figure out how to do something in the Blender UI -- which is beyond often, I'm beyond a Blender newbie, I'm a Blender user who cobbles something together by google searching how to do it -- I usually end up writing a python script to do what I need through the script interface. Obviously this only works for relatively simple things but is good for programmers who just need to get something done.



#27 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5261

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 12:07 PM

I've never been a huge fan of a lot of the Blender tutorials, as I don't really like video, and the best tutorials are video tutorials, or outdated.

 

So ive been slowly putting together a series of tutorials with a basic premise.  I assume my audience is a programmer with zero prior experience with blender.  Each tutorial is entirely static, with the exception of animated images ( no video ).  Each concludes with a reference table of the shortcuts used in the tutorial.  

 

The end goal of the series is to have a tutorial that covers each area ( modelling, animating, texturing, rendering ).  It teaches only HOW, not technique... thats a subject for other more artistic minded people; and something for experience to teach you.

 

Right now though, I've only go through 3/4 of the modelling section, hope you find these useful, if nothing else, they are somewhat unique! ;)

 

 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 1: Introduction 

Blender for Programmers -- Part 2: Selection and Navigation

Blender for Programmers -- Part 3: Introduction to 3D modelling

 

 

Then a somewhat related post I made earlier that is going to be incorporated into the above soon:

BMesh in Action: What's so special about ngons anyway?

 

Haven't had time to read through your tutorials, but I'd like to thank you for doing this. I had the exact thought that someone should write a book (or tutorial series) called "Blender for Programmers".

 

One thing that you should really cover is the Python interface. Basically when I can't figure out how to do something in the Blender UI -- which is beyond often, I'm beyond a Blender newbie, I'm a Blender user who cobbles something together by google searching how to do it -- I usually end up writing a python script to do what I need through the script interface. Obviously this only works for relatively simple things but is good for programmers who just need to get something done.

 

Thanks.

 

You know how we always give advice like "it doesn't matter which programming language you choose, they all work well" in the For Beginners threads... well, whenever I say this, I am lying a bit.  See, I hate Python.  I can't really put into words why, but after using dozens of programming languages in my life, Python and Perl ( and from my limited exposure, Objective C ) are the only two that I truly hate.  That language and I, we dont really see eye to eye.

 

So, I may not be the best person to write anything Python related. ;)  I've stayed away from Blender's programming side specifically because of the Python powered nature.



#28 jwezorek   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1770

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:01 PM

You know how we always give advice like "it doesn't matter which programming language you choose, they all work well" in the For Beginners threads... well, whenever I say this, I am lying a bit.  See, I hate Python.  I can't really put into words why, but after using dozens of programming languages in my life, Python and Perl ( and from my limited exposure, Objective C ) are the only two that I truly hate.  That language and I, we dont really see eye to eye.

 

Python doesn't bother me much, although I don't see what the reverence that some people  have for it is all about.  My only problem with Python is that I just don't see how not having to declare variables is ever helpful. But I don't hate it -- and co-routines are cool.

 

Perl on the other hand ... I mean, I just hate Perl. I would rather have a toe amputated than have to write something largish in Perl again ( I wouldn't want to write anything smallish either but would probably do so to save one of my toes). And further, I can't understand why anyone now or ever liked Perl -- it makes me question people's sanity, or at least wonder if their consciousness is fundamentally different than mine.


Edited by jwezorek, 20 March 2013 - 04:05 PM.


#29 Serapth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5261

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:46 AM

You know how we always give advice like "it doesn't matter which programming language you choose, they all work well" in the For Beginners threads... well, whenever I say this, I am lying a bit.  See, I hate Python.  I can't really put into words why, but after using dozens of programming languages in my life, Python and Perl ( and from my limited exposure, Objective C ) are the only two that I truly hate.  That language and I, we dont really see eye to eye.

 

Python doesn't bother me much, although I don't see what the reverence that some people  have for it is all about.  My only problem with Python is that I just don't see how not having to declare variables is ever helpful. But I don't hate it -- and co-routines are cool.

 

Perl on the other hand ... I mean, I just hate Perl. I would rather have a toe amputated than have to write something largish in Perl again ( I wouldn't want to write anything smallish either but would probably do so to save one of my toes). And further, I can't understand why anyone now or ever liked Perl -- it makes me question people's sanity, or at least wonder if their consciousness is fundamentally different than mine.

 

Perl is one of the only languages I have developed a bias against.

 

Back when I worked as a rank and file programmer, I never really held much bias against other programmers, be it self taught, university educated, from a Java enterprise background or someone who worked on realtime systems.  They all had different approaches sure, but generally could get the job done and if they had the aptitude, they could work together in a team setting.

 

The one strong exception to this rule were the perl "programmers".  Not the people that automate their lives using perl scripts, instead the ones that made complete systems out of this hateful language.  These people quite honestly tended to be among the worst programmers I ever had to deal with.  Short sited, no concept of design, unwilling to take the time to actually learn the language they were using, etc...  Seeing C++ generated by a perl programmer was always... interesting.  Reinvented wheels and two letter variables everywhere...

 

Of course, those are only my experiences only, YMMV.






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