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#1 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:54 PM

I want to start some C++ development. I usually code in C# but I think its time for me to learn another language.

 

What IDE do other C++ developers recommend?

I have VS2010 + VS2012 (though dreamspark), but I could also use eclipse, CodeBlocks, etc...

 

Any good modern C++ eBooks would also be nice.

 

All replies appriciated.

Thanks, Xanather.



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#2 Sean T. McBeth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1643

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:39 PM

Stick with Visual Studio so you're only having to learn on thing at a time. Frankly, there isn't a better IDE than Visual Studio, anyway.


[Formerly "capn_midnight". See some of my projects. Find me on twitter tumblr G+ Github.]


#3 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 21211

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:46 PM

Visual Studio is kinda the industry standard. However, not working in the industry, I use QtCreator instead. smile.png

I haven't used Visual Studio and so can't compare the two directly in terms of quality.


It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.
All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.
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#4 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:59 PM

Ok, should I install VS2010 or VS2012?



#5 Sean T. McBeth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1643

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:22 PM

2012. Why use old software?


[Formerly "capn_midnight". See some of my projects. Find me on twitter tumblr G+ Github.]


#6 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 21211

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 10:27 PM

Why not the latest version? By the time your done learning C++, you'll be on VS 2016 anyway.

 

By the way, Visual Studio is free - you don't have to get it from Dream Spark. The "Express" edition of Visual Studio is fully-featured and completely unhindered, even for commercial software.

 

The limitations of Visual C++ Express 2012 are: (from wikipedia)

  • No resource editor.
  • No built-in MFC support.
  • No built-in ATL support.
  • No profiling support.
  • No support for OpenMP.
  • No support for add-ins or IDE macros.
  • No option for crash dump generation (Debug->Save Dump As).

6 out of 7 you probably won't use for the first two years of your programming anyway. 5 out of 7 you might not use for the first five years of programming. Some you might never use. The Express version is perfectly fine for most needs.


Edited by Servant of the Lord, 03 January 2013 - 10:27 PM.

It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.
All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.
Of Stranger Flames - [indie turn-based rpg set in a para-historical French colony] | Indie RPG development journal

[Fly with me on Twitter] [Google+] [My broken website]

[Need web hosting? I personally like A Small Orange]


#7 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:17 PM

Awesome, looks like ill use VS2012. I just thought VS2012 was aimed at Windows 8 Store development more.

 

Thanks everyone :D.



#8 0r0d   Members   -  Reputation: 819

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:39 PM

Use Visual Studio and be thankful you dont have to work with Code Warrior or some other crappy thing like that.



#9 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 12:05 AM

Use Visual Studio and be thankful you dont have to work with Code Warrior or some other crappy thing like that.

 

Yeah i know, I am very thankful of dreamspark and its tools :)



#10 NightCreature83   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3037

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 02:47 AM

Why not the latest version? By the time your done learning C++, you'll be on VS 2016 anyway.

 

By the way, Visual Studio is free - you don't have to get it from Dream Spark. The "Express" edition of Visual Studio is fully-featured and completely unhindered, even for commercial software.

 

The limitations of Visual C++ Express 2012 are: (from wikipedia)

  • No resource editor.
  • No built-in MFC support.
  • No built-in ATL support.
  • No profiling support.
  • No support for OpenMP.
  • No support for add-ins or IDE macros.
  • No option for crash dump generation (Debug->Save Dump As).

6 out of 7 you probably won't use for the first two years of your programming anyway. 5 out of 7 you might not use for the first five years of programming. Some you might never use. The Express version is perfectly fine for most needs.

Yeah but there is no reason to pick the express edition when you have access to a free full edition, either through dreamspark, MSDN aa or your own license. Getting a plugin like Visual Assist X is useful as well.


Worked on titles: CMR:DiRT2, DiRT 3, DiRT: Showdown, GRID 2, Mad Max

#11 Sean T. McBeth   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1643

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 08:53 AM

I worked at a place that gave out Visual Assist X licenses like candy. Perhaps this is my lack of experience with large C++ project--we were using it with a gigantic C# project--but I didn't really see the point. All it seemed to do was bog my system down for tools that we wouldn't have needed if the chucklehead architect on the project hadn't tried to reimplement half of the Ruby on Rails stack in ASP.NET WebForms.


[Formerly "capn_midnight". See some of my projects. Find me on twitter tumblr G+ Github.]


#12 NightCreature83   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3037

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 09:04 AM


I worked at a place that gave out Visual Assist X licenses like candy. Perhaps this is my lack of experience with large C++ project--we were using it with a gigantic C# project--but I didn't really see the point. All it seemed to do was bog my system down for tools that we wouldn't have needed if the chucklehead architect on the project hadn't tried to reimplement half of the Ruby on Rails stack in ASP.NET WebForms.
Well in a major C++ codebase it is actually quite useful as VS doesn't come with any refactor tools built into the IDE for C++. I mostly use the Open file dialog they added and the "move implementation to header/cpp file" functions.

Edited by NightCreature83, 04 January 2013 - 09:06 AM.

Worked on titles: CMR:DiRT2, DiRT 3, DiRT: Showdown, GRID 2, Mad Max

#13 CyberMike   Banned   -  Reputation: 120

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:30 AM

I use VC2010 on Vista. Eclipse, sometimes Qtcreator, on Ubuntu.

 

With Win8 dev prev I got an error with VC2012 alike "invalid side by side config"



#14 Eliad Moshe   Members   -  Reputation: 813

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:37 AM

As said,

 

Visual Studio is the industry standard for Windows.

For GNU/LINUX with GCC or Windows with MinGW you can use Code::Blocks. 



#15 Khatharr   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3083

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 07:57 PM

VS can target linux can't it?
void hurrrrrrrr() {__asm sub [ebp+4],5;}

There are ten kinds of people in this world: those who understand binary and those who don't.

#16 nobodynews   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2118

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:44 PM

VS can target linux can't it?

No, for almost any definition of 'can'. In the same way Arnold Schwarzenegger 'can' become President of the United States of America (provided the constitution is rewritten to allow it).


C++: A Dialog | C++0x Features: Part1 (lambdas, auto, static_assert) , Part 2 (rvalue references) , Part 3 (decltype) | Write Games | Fix Your Timestep!


#17 Khatharr   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3083

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:43 PM

LMAO

I read you.
void hurrrrrrrr() {__asm sub [ebp+4],5;}

There are ten kinds of people in this world: those who understand binary and those who don't.

#18 gekko   Members   -  Reputation: 478

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 01:13 AM

VS can target linux can't it?

You can compile for anything you want with makefile projects, or you could actually write MSBuild projects which route through a different compiler.  Obviously you can't run it since you are on Windows, and you would need to deal with an external debugger (in this case one for Windows which can debug on a remote Linux machine).  But if you really wanted you could write some plug-ins that would launch that debugger from within Visual Studio and sync breakpoints.

 

It's all possible.  It's not really any different than targeting consoles.


-- gekko

#19 Yrjö P.   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1412

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 07:00 AM

Visual Assist X is insanely useful just for the navigation, commenting etc. functionality. If the Express version of VS can't use plugins, that is a major ding against it, and the Express version is nowhere near as good as the non-Express version. Lack of profiling is bad too.

I'm taking my first steps in learning Qt so I've just started using QtCreator. My first reaction is that it feels pretty nice, not clunky like Eclipse. Have not yet used it for C++, but I have a feeling it might end up being nicer to work in than VS Express. Especially so if the vi editing mode works nicely, but I haven't tried it yet. Qt itself is very good for getting something useful done in C++ and that would be a point in favor of using QtCreator.

That said: I would generally recommend someone getting into C or C++ to start with no IDE, and initially just use an editor, GCC and make so they get a concrete understanding of how the C and C++ compilation and linking process goes.

Edited by Stroppy Katamari, 06 January 2013 - 07:01 AM.





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