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How do I Replace Game Sounds?


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#21 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 12:46 PM

Nah, it feels stalkerish.


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#22 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8468

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:38 PM

I feel it may be derailing because I really want to ask what you do?  You seem rather in the know.  I'm assuming you're in the industry? =]

   You could just look at his sig, and follow the link in his sig...

Nah, it feels stalkerish.

 

Not at all.  He put the link in his sig so that people would click it and find out more about him.  It's actually kinder to follow his link and find out who he is than it is to ask him to explain who he is.


-- Tom Sloper
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#23 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:45 PM

I feel it may be derailing because I really want to ask what you do?  You seem rather in the know.  I'm assuming you're in the industry? =]

 

 

   You could just look at his sig, and follow the link in his sig...

 

Nah, it feels stalkerish.

 

Not at all.  He put the link in his sig so that people would click it and find out more about him.  It's actually kinder to follow his link and find out who he is than it is to ask him to explain who he is.

It was a joke!  My way of saying "Oops, I should have looked in the first place".

 

Anyway, I really need to steer this back to the point, because we've established that it's not a bad idea, Does anyone feel confident enough to give a rough overview of the potentially complicated process of replacing game sounds?


My sound design: (Under construction!)

My music: https://soundcloud.com/echo-gecko

Contactolliepm@googlemail.com


#24 nsmadsen   Moderators   -  Reputation: 3603

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 10:46 PM

Lol! Parts of this really crack me up! :)

 

No problem Olliepm. I'm a composer-sound designer who first started in 2005 (professionally) but has been doing digital music composition since 2000. But I assume you found all of that out by clicking on my sig. I also like the color blue, long walks on the beach and Tex Mex. :P

 

But back to your original topic:

 

Does anyone feel confident enough to give a rough overview of the potentially complicated process of replacing game sounds?

 

It really depends on what system the game used. For example I've done this where all I had to do was locate the files, change all of the original assets to a file_name_old naming convention and then make sure whatever new sounds were named and located in the right spot. The easiest way to check is to find a really unique sound and test it out. I used a "boing" sound for the first pistol you get in the game. But if you're wanting to reverse engineer FMOD files... well, that's something I've not done. I've used FMOD in several of the projects I've worked on officially so I can certainly explain how FMOD works but I've never tried to reverse engineer it, honestly.

 

Hope that helps... somewhat.

 

Nate


Nathan Madsen
Composer-Sound Designer
Madsen Studios

#25 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 11:02 PM

 

 

Hope that helps... somewhat.

 

 

 

I did check out your link actually, and this does help because now I'm assuming that if there'something that someone like you,(with that behemoth list of achievements!) hasn't done, it's probably not all that easy to do =/  The person who recommended UDK has also helped because it's a fair bit easier to get started altering the sound in the sample project than I thought it'd be for a beginner.   I appreciate when professionals take the time to help students, so thank you for replying.

So, what I'm now thinking is it'd be worth while to locate a list of games that use common file types for audio, and just be content with what's available.  If anyone's interested, I have one already.  X3:Terran Conflict.  God, I hate that game.

 

Also, a thank you to all who've replied: It's always greatly appreciated to be responded to =]  

 

It's like summoning minions who've heard their masters call mahaha


My sound design: (Under construction!)

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#26 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 16679

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:06 AM

Why not try an open source game like Battle for Wesnoth or Lincity?

 

And hey, if you create better sounds for it, why not contribute it back to that open source project?

You could ask for your name in the credits, and give them non-exclusive permission to use those sounds and music (depending on the project's licensing requirements), while also not giving everyone permission (just that project). The game itself could be a subtle billboard ad which you might get one or two future contracts or contacts through.

 

Or, make a sound mod for a popular game like Minecraft, which encourages mods. Make sure to name the mod something that leads people to google about you like, if you were nsmadsen, "Minecraft Madsen Mod" or "Minecraft Madsen Music Mod", so people would be curious what the "Madsen" part of the mod refers to, and also so people wanting to download this uber-popular mod would google the mod, and find the mod hosted on your studio's website and next time they need music or sound, they'll have your studio name stuck in their head.

 

Bethesda is also supportive of mods for their Elder Scrolls series. A mod that is high quality and popular in their community, like the (fictional) "Madsen Skyrim Music" mod might reach the attention of developers of the Skyrim game itself, and next time they are rushed for deadlines and need to outsource some musical work they might give Nathan a call.

 

I think this would be a better idea than modding a commercial game from a studio or publisher that has twitchy-fingered lawyers, plus mod-friendly games usually have better modding documentation and modding communities that would be very mentally supportive and practically helpful in what you are doing.


Edited by Servant of the Lord, 06 January 2013 - 12:08 AM.

It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.

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#27 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:11 PM

Great advice!  Does anyone know of list of open source games worth looking at?  Out of the three named above, I have only played the Elder Scrolls series (on Xbox360).  Part of the reason I was attempting change the sounds in Bioshock for example was because It's a game I know, and love, and could really be motivated to give the project my all.  I do really like Skyrim, but I thought it was probably a bit too huge a game and I'd be out of my depth trying to make an impact with it.  Hopefully there is a game I'm more familiar/comfortable with that is open source, and I just don't know it yetwink.png


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#28 dakota.potts   Members   -  Reputation: 455

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 03:11 PM

This thread has inspired me to start by modding Minecraft, which I already own.

If you don't want to play online, you can download the basic game for free. My brother mods it to make his own textures, change the color of certain ores, add glow effects, things like that.

#29 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:14 AM

This thread has inspired me to start by modding Minecraft, which I already own.

If you don't want to play online, you can download the basic game for free. My brother mods it to make his own textures, change the color of certain ores, add glow effects, things like that.

 When I googled 'Audio mod' just to see if there was such a genre of mods that only affected the audio, all I could really find was Minecraft related stuff.  Is it easy to mod the audio?


My sound design: (Under construction!)

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#30 AdrianC   Members   -  Reputation: 602

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 04:41 PM

Not sure about Minecraft.

 

Starcraft 2 has a pretty powerful editor, and I believe you can add custom sounds to that. Not sure how interested you're in that genre though. If you don't want to pay $40, there's also Warcraft 3. Pretty old, but also has a map editor. Not sure if it supports sounds or not. You should research before buying.



#31 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 16679

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 04:55 PM

Sure, Minecraft has their sound and music files saved in Ogg Vorbis format, and holds them in "C:\Users\<windows-user-nme>\AppData\Roaming\.minecraft\resources".

 

Note: The 'AppData' folder is a hidden folder, so make sure you enable the viewing of hidden folders.

In Windows 7, you can do so by: Organize -> Folder and search options -> View -> "Show hidden files, folders, and drives"

 

This will vary from user to user, computer to computer, but once you find where yours is stored, you can mod it on your own machine. Once you get the modifications to the quality level you want to represent yourself as a composer, you can find someone in the Minecraft modding community who can help you package up your changes in a way that any Minecraft player could install.

 

Minecraft only officially supports texture packs, but a sound mod wouldn't be too hard to install.

 

Best of luck! smile.png


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#32 bschmidt1962   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1699

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:40 PM

Boy---I get the flu for a couple days and miss a great thread!

 

nsmadsen (as he always does) had great replies.

 

I also 100% concur that one of the best things to do is to try to re-do the sound package for a game.  Like Nathan said, that's something we recommend to just about anyone who asks.

 

One of the hiccups is that for the most part, game audio has evolved well beyond the notion of "a game event triggers a .wav playback".  Modern games have very sophisticated audio engines-- a game event may cause multiple sound to be triggered, along with specific metadata (like pitch, volume, etc) for each.  Gameplay variables may change how sounds are playing mid-stream, etc.  All this complexity means that the the file formats used to store all this information got much more complex than just "a directory full of mp3 files."

 

Unfortunately that means that games that are simple enough where you can just swap out .mp3s (or oggs, etc) are good, but won't show you some of the complexity present in modern AAA games.  But by all means, it's a great place to start!

 

Best of luck-- please report back!

Brian Schmidt

Brian Schmidt Studios

GameSoundCon


Brian Schmidt

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GameSoundCon 2014:October 7-8, Los Angeles, CA

 

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#33 dakota.potts   Members   -  Reputation: 455

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:36 PM


This thread has inspired me to start by modding Minecraft, which I already own.

If you don't want to play online, you can download the basic game for free. My brother mods it to make his own textures, change the color of certain ores, add glow effects, things like that.

 When I googled 'Audio mod' just to see if there was such a genre of mods that only affected the audio, all I could really find was Minecraft related stuff.  Is it easy to mod the audio?
 



They have a large community that supports modding, and my computer can barely run any modern games, so it's great for me. They're .ogg files as well as a few Finale files. The hardest part for me is going to be playing the .ogg files so I can figure out what each one is. For instance, they have 4 different footsteps on gravel. I need to know which one is walking, running, crouching/sneaking, etc.

Once I do this I'd like to move on to something like the Source Developers Kit to mod Half-Life 2 or Left 4 Dead, and then work with something more complicated like FMOD. There's a whole community of Half-Life 2 modifications that I could join once I do a couple replacements successfully.

#34 Moritz P.G. Katz   Members   -  Reputation: 1041

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:31 AM

Hello,

Hope you're feeling better, Brian!

I don't have much to add, I'd just like to give another +1 to experimenting with the audio programming side of things.
Even if your next job doesn't use the same exact tools, you'll already be acquainted with most general concepts. I constantly learn along the way while doing jobs, but it's cool to be prepared or to be able to say to potential clients, "I haven't used that middleware before, but I've tinkered with this one and that one and I'm sure I can pick it up very fast."

Great thread indeed, keep us posted. smile.png

Cheers,
Moritz

Check out my Music/Sound Design Reel on moritzpgkatz.de


#35 Olliepm   Members   -  Reputation: 260

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:14 PM

One of the hiccups is that for the most part, game audio has evolved well beyond the notion of "a game event triggers a .wav playback".  Modern games have very sophisticated audio engines-- a game event may cause multiple sound to be triggered, along with specific metadata (like pitch, volume, etc) for each.  Gameplay variables may change how sounds are playing mid-stream, etc. 

 

 

 

Best of luck-- please report back!

Am I right in thinking i recognize you?  I'm sure you are the same person I once saw in a video, giving a lecture on game sound design?  It was fantastic, and was in fact my introduction to all things game audio, on that day I decide to look into it for the first time!  I'll feel quite silly if I'm confusing your dp with someone else, but if not I owe you many thanks for the perfect beginners introduction. =]

 

Reporting back for now:  As I think I may have said, I started looking at UDK, and have got the hang of the basic interface and sound cue editior, so that ( and not to mention unrelated college work)  has slightly steered my focus away from the 'reverse' engineering' query i made with this thread.  I do however have the means to steer back due to something you said as shown in the quote above though.  In what ways could one create, and replace the metadata you speak of?  For example: If I wanted to edit the sounds in Arkham City, which was developed with Wwise, could I use my own copy of Wwise to re-integrate the audio, somehow?  I have dabbled in Wwise before, so feel confident I could utilize some of it's features, but I'm still at a level where I'm not sure where the line is drawn between sound designers and programmers, when it comes to events.  I know how to create an event in Wwise, but I'm not sure how I can have that correspond with a pre existing game, knowing very little about the programming/techy side of things.


My sound design: (Under construction!)

My music: https://soundcloud.com/echo-gecko

Contactolliepm@googlemail.com





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