Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

We're offering banner ads on our site from just $5!

1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


How does one find a name?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
9 replies to this topic

#1 noatom   Members   -  Reputation: 785

Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:10 PM

The whole evening I tried to find a good name for a game company,but I failed.How does one create a good one?

I mean I find the following names amazing:
activision
electronic arts
coded illusions
idea factory

And there are the other types,so weird that stick in your mind:
valve
raven software

How does one create such an awesome name? Every time I think about something,it's already used,or it's very closed to something that already exists!

Sponsor:

#2 Inu_   Members   -  Reputation: 281

Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:55 PM

It wasnt an awsome name when they first though of it, "Valve" was a weird name at the time and still is a weird name now, but because of all the games/tecnology they made they are now know across the industry and we all know the name and put a height onto it.

 

Same with all the others, most started out with a random name idea and then worked to become something out of their creations.

 

So what mattered in the end wasnt really an awsome name but awsome games

 



#3 Madhed   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3098

Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:04 PM

What Inu said. Most company names became awesome because of the awesome stuff they made.

 

Plus, I like alliterations so maybe

 

* big bloc games

* pixel perfect software

* redrock interactive

* ...

 

makes it easier to remember the name =)



#4 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4588

Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:07 PM

id doesnt sounds that good. Bethesda Studios either (i mean, its [insert place] Studios lol). Steam sounds like the biggest online distribution system for videogames worlwide? Well no, it could have been called Microwave the same lol

 

(Codemasters sounds pretty cool though)

 

Anyway, the name doesn't says much, its more the image of the company attached to it. Even more speaking of companies that have been more than 10 years in the industry which have set their images in it.


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#5 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14033

Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:38 PM

I tend to be more literal with my names.

I named my memory-hacking software “Memory Hacking Software” and I will likely name my company “L. Spiro’s Company”.

 

Try “noatom’s Company”.  “noatom’s Game Company”.  “Game Company of noatom”.

 

You can see how these would catch on easily and stick in everyone’s mind.

 

 

Other tactics I have seen employed are to use foreign words.

I worked at Sanuk Games in Thailand.  “Sanuk” (sa-nook) is Thai for “fun”.

 

People typically pick Japanese for this.

My friend will name his company “Kurage Studios” because he likes jellyfish.

Pick your favorite animal, translate to Japanese, put “Studios” after it, and you have an instant winner.  Just take these names for example:

Unagi Studios

Kuma Studios

Shishi Studios

Mekajiki Studios

Tanuki Studios

 

Names of cool objects work just as well.

Kasei Studios

Tsukimi Studios

 

And you can throw in Mega, Mecha, and Neo for added measure.

Mega-Tsunami Studios Neo

Neo noatom’s Game Company

Mecha-Suishin-ki Games

 

 

 

You can also dump the following list of random words:

Rock

Acti

Arts

Electronic

Vision

Red

Turtle

Bear

Games

Code

Master

Soft

L. Spiro

Factory

Idea

 

…into a hat and pull them out randomly.  Repeat until satisfied.  Translate some to Japanese for heightened satisfaction.

 

 

L. Spiro


Edited by L. Spiro, 05 January 2013 - 04:39 PM.

It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
L. Spiro Engine: http://lspiroengine.com
L. Spiro Engine Forums: http://lspiroengine.com/forums

#6 Paradigm Shifter   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 5413

Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:51 PM

I like a name no-one else has ever thought of. So I use http://www.guidgen.com/<br /><br />Must dash, it's time to put my child 2fe3608b-fe5f-41e1-b74d-13b5f92d7428 to bed now.
"Most people think, great God will come from the sky, take away everything, and make everybody feel high" - Bob Marley

#7 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 05 January 2013 - 07:42 PM

I think in general you should aim for something simple. Pretty much anything simple can evolve to be something cool. A name that's complicated will probably just get shorthanded to something simple eventually, so why let somebody else decide your company's identity?



#8 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 9105

Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:30 PM

 One thing I find works, is try to take two or three random words, and put them together. Sometimes it sounds awesome, even if it's completely meaningless. Like:

 

deep possum software

melons united

green pie games

etc..

 

IMO a name doesn't have to mean anything, it's merely a label to refer to you and your company, so why not make it fun and memorable?


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#9 Arale   Members   -  Reputation: 206

Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:27 AM

I tend to be more literal with my names.

I named my memory-hacking software “Memory Hacking Software” and I will likely name my company “L. Spiro’s Company”.

 

Try “noatom’s Company”.  “noatom’s Game Company”.  “Game Company of noatom”.

 

You can see how these would catch on easily and stick in everyone’s mind.

 

 

Other tactics I have seen employed are to use foreign words.

I worked at Sanuk Games in Thailand.  “Sanuk” (sa-nook) is Thai for “fun”.

 

People typically pick Japanese for this.

My friend will name his company “Kurage Studios” because he likes jellyfish.

Pick your favorite animal, translate to Japanese, put “Studios” after it, and you have an instant winner.  Just take these names for example:

Unagi Studios

Kuma Studios

Shishi Studios

Mekajiki Studios

Tanuki Studios

 

Names of cool objects work just as well.

Kasei Studios

Tsukimi Studios

 

And you can throw in Mega, Mecha, and Neo for added measure.

Mega-Tsunami Studios Neo

Neo noatom’s Game Company

Mecha-Suishin-ki Games

 

 

 

You can also dump the following list of random words:

Rock

Acti

Arts

Electronic

Vision

Red

Turtle

Bear

Games

Code

Master

Soft

L. Spiro

Factory

Idea

 

…into a hat and pull them out randomly.  Repeat until satisfied.  Translate some to Japanese for heightened satisfaction.

 

 

L. Spiro

Oh my god... the secrets are revealed.


Edited by Arale, 09 January 2013 - 10:32 AM.


#10 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

Posted 09 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

melons united

 

Quoting for awesomeness.


Hazard Pay :: FPS/RTS in SharpDX
DeviantArt :: Because right-brain needs love too




Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS