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#1 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:15 AM

I want to start learning C++ for game programming.

 

I need a book that teaches C++ in a friendly way, I noticed Bjarne Stroustrup has a new C++11 book coming out soon but Ive heard that book is only good for using it as a reference for the language features. I already know quite alot of C# so I probably dont need to start from a real beginner friendly book. Any recommendations for a good modern C++ book to self learn from would be nice smile.png.

 

I also want to start with basic 2D games Ive found this book:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Programming-2D-Games-Charles-Kelly/dp/146650868X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357489298&sr=8-1&keywords=2D+DirectX#reader_146650868X

 

I looked through the chapters and it has everything I need. Input/Sound/2D rendering/etc... using DirectX11 (edit: sorry i mean DirectX9). What do you think about this book? Is there any other better 2D DirectX C++ books?

 

All replies are appriciated.

Thanks, Xanather.


Edited by Xanather, 08 January 2013 - 01:25 AM.


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#2 Magnus Westin   Members   -  Reputation: 158

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:16 AM

The book I usually recommend is C++ Primer Plus by Stephen Prata. I think its a good book, that goes through all of C++. And its not written like a reference book, which makes it good for beginners also.

One thing though, it doesn't talk about compilers and development environments. So if you want/need to learn that also, you need a book for that also (or just find tutorials on the web, plenty of those).

Edited by Magnus Westin, 07 January 2013 - 02:18 AM.


#3 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:48 AM

Okay will look at that thanks.



#4 Khatharr   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3078

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:58 AM

C# and C++ are not very similar in their use. Don't be deceived by evil market-objective driven naming schemes. C# is more similar to Java than C++.

That C++ book Magnus recommends looks like the right type. I'm a little wary that it 'tacks on' the C++11 changes as a final chapter instead of just integrating them into the text, but it looks like you can get it for $30 or less and it may be useful to you to clearly see the difference between C++11 and earlier versions, since not everyone is updated yet. Mainly I'd point out that books in that format usually have 'cheat-sheets' that list things out in an easy-to-reference format which can be useful long after you've learned the core language concepts. If all else fails the index of the book can be used to look up concepts, so try to get the ebook.

That being said, there are online references for C++ that get updated when things change, so if you struggle with textbook-style books then shoot for something a bit more colorful to get you started (more colors and exciting pictures on the front page generally mean it's easier to read whereas a textbook-style cover usually means that it systematically covers everything in detail).

That DX book you've got there looks like it may be at about the level you're looking for. Personally I'd poke around half-price-books or whatever you have in your area to see if I could spend something closer to $10 or $20 rather than $60. That kind of book should be very helpful in moving you into the DirectX world, but once you're there you're probably going to look back at it maybe five times and then it's a $60 paperweight. Poke around used bookstores online and if all else fails and you really want that book then try to get it in ebook format. (Not saying it's a bad book or that it's not worth $60. I'm just saying that if you can get something that's more or less the same for less cash then don't waste your bills on impulse shopping.)

For DirectX you won't need a reference book though (a tutorial book, sure, but not a reference book), since it's documented both on MSDN and in the .chm files that are installed along with it (which are a copy of the MSDN docs).
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#5 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 05:36 AM

C# and C++ are not very similar in their use. Don't be deceived by evil market-objective driven naming schemes. C# is more similar to Java than C++.

Yeah, im aware of that. I remember when I used to think they were similar.

 

And yes I was hoping to get the eBook (PDF) of C++ Primer Plus 6th Edition but having a bit of trouble finding where. I dont really want kindle.


Edited by Xanather, 07 January 2013 - 05:37 AM.


#6 dmreichard   Members   -  Reputation: 384

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:27 AM

C++ Primer is good. http://www.amazon.com/Primer-5th-Edition-Stanley-Lippman/dp/0321714113/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357579265&sr=8-1&keywords=C%2B%2B+primer



#7 lride   Members   -  Reputation: 633

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:37 PM

C# and C++ are not very similar in their use. Don't be deceived by evil market-objective driven naming schemes. C# is more similar to Java than C++.

Yeah, im aware of that. I remember when I used to think they were similar.

 

And yes I was hoping to get the eBook (PDF) of C++ Primer Plus 6th Edition but having a bit of trouble finding where. I dont really want kindle.

It seems like it's pirated


An invisible text.

#8 Caius Cosades   Members   -  Reputation: 122

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

Alongside whatever beginners book you choose to buy, I highly recommend also buying Effective C++ by Scott Meyers and its sequel More Effective C++. Each of them presents a list of things you should and shouldn't do in C++, and explains in some depth exactly why.


Edited by Caius Cosades, 07 January 2013 - 04:42 PM.


#9 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:03 AM

What is the difference between C++ Primer and C++ Primer Plus? Which is better? I am about to buy the C++ Primer Plus physical book, but before I do so i'm just curious, they both have VERY similar names.



#10 Magnus Westin   Members   -  Reputation: 158

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:57 AM

I have read both, and while they basically take up the same information. I found C++ Primer Plus easier to read, but that is probably quite a personal preference smile.png  I thought it had a better "flow" to it, so I found it more enjoyable.



#11 Xanather   Members   -  Reputation: 712

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:58 AM

Ok, thanks :)






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