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high dynamic range rendering


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#1 mrmohadnan   Members   -  Reputation: 279

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 03:17 AM

hello , I am design game using XNA , I work on apply HDR rendering for my images , but the problem is I don't understand well the 

The LogLuv Encoding for Full Gamut  !! I take alot of math courses , but still bit confused ! so any prerequisite books for this title so that I can understand HDR for games !! 

I took digital image processing course :)



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#2 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 31920

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:25 AM

LogLuv encoding was popular many years ago, when support for floating-point textures on GPUs was rare and/or slow.

 

These days, it's better to not bother with fancy encodings like that, and instead just use a floating-point texture format, such as HalfVector4 (a.k.a. D3DFMT_A16B16G16R16F).



#3 jeffkingdev   Members   -  Reputation: 783

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:42 AM

Hodgman,

Do most video cards these days support the floating point textures? Do the onboard cards do this now too?

Thanks
Jeff.

#4 swiftcoder   Senior Moderators   -  Reputation: 10396

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 09:48 AM

Do most video cards these days support the floating point textures? Do the onboard cards do this now too?

Even those god-awful Intel integrated chipsets have had floating point textures for a couple of generations now.


Tristam MacDonald - Software Engineer @Amazon - [swiftcoding]


#5 CC Ricers   Members   -  Reputation: 802

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:16 PM

As you're working with XNA, it's advisable to use the HdrBlendable surface format. It's a floating point format specifically made for HDR use, which uses 4 Half Vectors for GPUs on the PC. Just keep in mind its limitations, like not being able to use a linear texture filter for it.


My development blog: Electronic Meteor




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