Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Decent desktop calculator?


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
11 replies to this topic

#1 irreversible   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1236

Posted 04 February 2013 - 05:43 AM

Has to be free. Has to combine all the stupidly separated modes the Windows 8 calculator has. Has to have better history. Can have a learning curve, but should still feel like an elementary tool. Should be lightweight.

 

Bonus 1: be able to resolve formulas into graphs

Bonus 2: be able to sketch polygons on a grid, be able to view lengths, angles and name vertices; being able to color stuff by shape would be nice

Bonus 3: based on bonuses 1 and 2, an offline save/load function would be nice

 

It's 2013 - I don't think it's that much to ask. Apparently it is from Google, anyway.



Sponsor:

#2 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8287

Posted 04 February 2013 - 06:03 AM

Well, WolframAlpha (aka "online mathematica") surely qualifies as lightweight, has a bit of a learning curve and is by design easy to use, though it can misinterpret your input if you don't use the commands directly. It can certainly do everything a desktop calculator can. That said, it is unfortunately no longer free, and most of the cool advanced features (data analysis, etc..) are not available to guests...

 

You could use LaTeX/Tikz to draw polygons and possibly graphs, with no limitations, though the learning curve is quite punishing. You can then save and even share the text scripts everywhere. Not sure it qualifies as an "elementary tool" and it's not exactly lightweight, though I'm sure web services exist. But the "calculator" aspect is obviously lost, unless you are insane and want to use the preprocessor to compute stuff.


Edited by Bacterius, 04 February 2013 - 06:05 AM.

The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#3 Lode   Members   -  Reputation: 980

Posted 04 February 2013 - 05:19 PM

What do you mean, wolfram alpha no longer free? It seems to work for free for me :/

 

Anyway, feel free to hate it, after all I made it for personal use, but maybe the calculator on my website:

 

http://lodev.org/jscalc/jscalc.html



#4 Luckless   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1732

Posted 04 February 2013 - 05:33 PM

I tended to just reach for python and a few fairly feature rich libraries. (Can't recall which ones off hand, but my favourite was a math related one with a strong focus on graphing equations)

Run in interactive mode, and coded features as I needed them.
Old Username: Talroth
If your signature on a web forum takes up more space than your average post, then you are doing things wrong.

#5 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8287

Posted 04 February 2013 - 10:14 PM

What do you mean, wolfram alpha no longer free? It seems to work for free for me :/

 

Anyway, feel free to hate it, after all I made it for personal use, but maybe the calculator on my website:

 

http://lodev.org/jscalc/jscalc.html

 

Yeah, if you're OK with half the features being reserved to "pro users" and advertisements nagging you every two queries.


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#6 irreversible   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1236

Posted 05 February 2013 - 04:28 AM

Hm - it's actually kind of funny how there is no all-in-one free solution out there. After all there's one for most types of software from OpenOffice to VLC to Linux etc.

 

Yet no calculator.

 

In a way this is surreal.



#7 Milcho   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1171

Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:20 AM

I use the very lightweight and pretty high feature Powertoy calculator for winxp. It can run on windows 7 - best done if you can find somewhere to download the standalone exe and run it in comparability mode. Haven't tried it on Win8 though, so I don't know if it will work.

Microsoft site: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/xp-downloads#2TC=powertoys - see the Power Calculator - but I suggest you google for the standalone exe - someone had it posted somewhere. Or you can try to install, or even better if you have an old xp machine, install there and just copy the .exe. If all else fails and you want to try it, I can put up a copy of it on my site

 

Features: It can graph simple functions, store formulas, has a very good (imo) history, supports binary and hex (entered as ###b for binary and 0x### for hex), has basic functions - trigs/logs, supports up to 512 bit precision, and has unit conversion (which is the only feature I don't use).



#8 Waterlimon   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2419

Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:23 AM

This has lately been annoying me too, the windows calculator is just too annoying to use for anything but the most basic operations. Luckily i have my physical calculator i need for school :3


o3o


#9 shuma-gorath   Members   -  Reputation: 887

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:33 AM

I use SpeedCrunch as my default calculator.  I use 0.11-alpha because the release version was missing some important feature--though I can't recall what that was. 

 

Pros:

-Free

-It's like a hybrid of the Windows built-in calculator and the PowerToys calculator.

-Sessions can be saved

-Works on latest versions of Windows

-Hasn't crashed on me

 

Cons:

-No graphing support

-Hasn't been updated for years

-Limited binary support (No binary operations, but you can view the results as binary.)


Edited by shuma-gorath, 05 February 2013 - 10:35 AM.


#10 Memories are Better   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 769

Posted 05 February 2013 - 01:52 PM

Download MS Maths, its free

 

It solves, draws graphs, solves triangles, etc

 

You know it has so many features that during my pre-calculus, calculus and physics refresher I never once had to use anything else.

 

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=15702



#11 Lode   Members   -  Reputation: 980

Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:30 PM

How about Octave?

It's basically an open source implementation of sometihng similar to Matlab. And Matlab is good!



#12 irreversible   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1236

Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:41 PM

Download MS Maths, its free

 

It solves, draws graphs, solves triangles, etc

 

You know it has so many features that during my pre-calculus, calculus and physics refresher I never once had to use anything else.

 

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=15702

 

Ok, I'm liking this a lot at first sight.

 

Too bad it only has a triangle solver, but not really the ability to sketch and measure lines and polygonal data in general, though :(






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS