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What is your employers policy on coming in late?


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Poll: What is your employers policy on coming in late? (58 member(s) have cast votes)

Employers policy on being late

  1. I can't even be a minute late (1 votes [1.72%])

    Percentage of vote: 1.72%

  2. Within the first 5 minutes they don't care (4 votes [6.90%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.90%

  3. Within the first 15 minutes they don't care (4 votes [6.90%])

    Percentage of vote: 6.90%

  4. Within the first 30 minutes they don't care (2 votes [3.45%])

    Percentage of vote: 3.45%

  5. They don't care at all as long as I work the hours I'm suppose to (29 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

  6. Since I'm flexible with them, they are flexible with me (18 votes [31.03%])

    Percentage of vote: 31.03%

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#21 Alamar   Members   -  Reputation: 256

Posted 10 February 2013 - 12:11 AM

I've had the people who required "exactly 40 hour weeks", which typically meant a 45-50 hour week.  I quit.
 
The managers I've had for the past 7 years or so have agreed with the fact that we are all adults.  We know what a full work day is.  We can tell when our creativity has run out for the day.  Sometimes people will put in a 9 or 10 hour day, other times they may be done at 6 or 7 hours.  All that matters is that it mostly balances out in the end and that they get their job done.  We have had the rare individual who will abuse it, and routinely put in 6 hour days, but they are rare and are quickly dealt with.

 

Companies that regularly require a min of 40, and max of whatever they can get away with, is not where I work for long ; )

 

Where I'm at now, is more along the lines of your last paragraph... I typically work from home two days a week, and the other days, I'll be at the office between 4 and 10 hours, but my boss knows how much I contribute, and the hours I put in outside (including weekends)... It's not the same for my co-workers though, so it's not purely the business that is this way, which is unfortunate, but I'm fine with being a special snowflake ; )  So I typically put in 50-60 hour weeks, because of the flexibility they afford me.

 

Not surprisingly, I chose the flexible with me vs them ; )

 

-Alamar



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#22 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 32049

Posted 10 February 2013 - 06:49 AM

Companies that regularly require a min of 40, and max of whatever they can get away with, is not where I work for long ; )

Here in Australia, a min of 40 is actually illegal under threat of a $300,000 fine wink.png

The maximum work hours you can request of someone (on average over a "reasonable period") is 38 hours per week.

e.g. If I did three 50 hour weeks, then I'd have to have that over-time repaid to me by following it up with a 2 hour week (50+50+50+2 == 38+38+38+38)

 

However if you are late due to train delays, you can get a small paper from the train station that says they had a delay and the company will forgive such a case.

I know this is just a cultural difference (plus the likelihood of a Japanese train being late is much lower than an Australian train), but if I asked a station employee to write a note to my boss saying the train is late, they'd likely be extremely puzzled and think I was a bit crazy... and if my manager asked for proof that my train was actually late, I'd be offended at the insinuation that I'm lying.

We can tell when our creativity has run out for the day.  Sometimes people will put in a 9 or 10 hour day, other times they may be done at 6 or 7 hours.  All that matters is that it mostly balances out in the end and that they get their job done.  We have had the rare individual who will abuse it, and routinely put in 6 hour days, but they are rare and are quickly dealt with.

What if you get a person who's creativity runs out after 6 hours routinely, but during that time they're 200% as productive as anyone else? Does it matter if their hours don't 'balance out' to a 40 hour week as long as they're getting a good amount of work done?


Edited by Hodgman, 10 February 2013 - 07:01 AM.


#23 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 14447

Posted 10 February 2013 - 07:23 AM

if I asked a station employee to write a note to my boss saying the train is late, they'd likely be extremely puzzled and think I was a bit crazy...

If the trains run late there is already a stack of little papers you can just pick up that the stations provide automatically, pre-stamped and waiting for your fingers.

I’ve never used one since I come in many hours early so I don’t know the details.


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#24 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2185

Posted 10 February 2013 - 12:06 PM

We have the flexi time system too. Core: 8:30 - 15:00, Friday: 8:30-13:30. You have to work 8 hours a day in average (in a month). If you have +8 hours, you can take a day off (only once a month, but the balance rolls over the months). If you have negative balance, you might have reduced bonus. If you are late from the core hours, usually nothing happens, you just receive a paper that you have to sign (the same paper that you get if you don't properly check in or out). It doesn't have consequences yet, though there are some changes in sight in the company, and some other bosses may be more prick about the thing than mine.


Edited by szecs, 10 February 2013 - 12:07 PM.


#25 Nypyren   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4826

Posted 10 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

My employer doesn't really care about hours at all, as long as we get our assigned work done and don't get burnt out.  We have core hours to help with scheduling meetings (10:00-16:00).



#26 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

Posted 10 February 2013 - 07:29 PM

What about lunch?

 

People take lunch in there if they want, most of the team is salaried anyway.  The point is that the "core hours" keep people from scheduling their hours in the middle of the night or something wildly outside everyone else' availability (and we're not international, so no general worry about time zones outside the US).


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#27 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2509

Posted 11 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

For some jobs like high volume phone support, being on time is critical.

 

Personally, I wouldn't work for a company that didn't allow me at least some flexibility in work hours. At my current job, we don't have flexi-time as such, but there's plenty of leeway as long as the work gets done (i.e. I finish early on Mondays to teach, I just either do some work at home that evening or work a bit later tuesday)


if you think programming is like sex, you probably haven't done much of either.-------------- - capn_midnight

#28 MJP   Moderators   -  Reputation: 11846

Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:50 PM

Everybody my job is cool with being a little late, although it's usually a good idea to send an email or a text if you're going to be more than 20 min late. I don't think I would ever work anywhere where I got a hard time for showing up a little late, especially if I were working late the night before.



#29 LennyLen   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4036

Posted 13 February 2013 - 07:01 AM

but if I asked a station employee to write a note to my boss saying the train is late, they'd likely be extremely puzzled and think I was a bit crazy... 

 

And if you're in Melbourne then it's expected that your train will be late.

 

If I'm late, I tell myself off.



#30 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2957

Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:23 AM

Biggest problem with not being at the office is that I don't get to meet all my nice co-workers, and discussing things are easier in person then on skype.

 

We don't really have any core hours, though the company offers breakfast every morning, sometime between 9-9:30, if you're not there at that time, then you miss it, including any discussion that usually happens then.

 

Of course, you have to contribute to production and complete the work you've been assigned/volunteered for.



#31 u1bd2005   Members   -  Reputation: 170

Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:52 AM

Basically if we're late and another staff member has to stay late to cover for us then they get paid for the time and the person who's late loses out on the time, though if we're running late and its not essential for someone else to cover til you get there then they usually dont mind if you stay late to make up the time.



#32 rnlf   Members   -  Reputation: 1185

Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:34 AM

We have core times from 9:30 to 3:00pm, but unless you miss a meeting, nobody actually cares if you miss that time...


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#33 Katie   Members   -  Reputation: 1376

Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:08 PM

"unless you miss a meeting, nobody actually cares"

 

You have compulsory meetings? What a quaint idea...



#34 aditd   Members   -  Reputation: 127

Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:22 PM

Out of curiosity I wanted to know what was everyones experience with coming in late to work? Do your employers care as long as you work 7 or 8 hours?  If so how tolerant are they?  is there 0 minute tolerance, 5 minute, 15 minute etc...

 

Since I'm flexible with them, they are flexible with me
                                    
And that is the why it should be, cause you are going to work to solve problems not to be on tine on work.                                       


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#35 LennyLen   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4036

Posted 16 February 2013 - 07:28 PM

Out of curiosity I wanted to know what was everyones experience with coming in late to work? Do your employers care as long as you work 7 or 8 hours?  If so how tolerant are they?  is there 0 minute tolerance, 5 minute, 15 minute etc...

 

Since I'm flexible with them, they are flexible with me
                                    
And that is the why it should be, cause you are going to work to solve problems not to be on tine on work.                                       

 

You're assuming that everyone else is employed as a programmer.  I'm a manager of a restaurant, so I do actually need to be on time as I have the keys.



#36 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 32049

Posted 17 February 2013 - 12:51 AM

For some jobs like high volume phone support, being on time is critical.

You're assuming that everyone else is employed as a programmer.  I'm a manager of a restaurant, so I do actually need to be on time as I have the keys.

Yeah seeing we're on GD.Net, I was taking this topic to be within the games industry, but the answers would/should be very different in the broader workforce. Pretty much any kind of service or retail oriented job is going to have some strict time constraints on it.

When hiring games staff though, you're basically commissioning a piece of art from an artisan plus inventor. Sure you can put a constraint on them as to when you'd like to be able to present/sell the piece, but mandating that the artisan/inventor be present at a desk of your choosing for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week is just silly, it's irrelevant to the work you've tasked them with. The way I see it, you're sponsoring these inventors in exchange for them to dedicate their minds to your cause. You pay their living expenses and top up their savings account, and in exchange you own the copyright over their creative output for that period.
If there's evidence that fixed 40 hour weeks and squabbling over break times and punctuality improve creative output, then sure, enforce those policies with an iron grip... otherwise, find out what does enhance the creative output of the people that you're sponsoring.

 

 

p.s. is anyone else annoyed that every new vote in the poll bumps this thread back up to the top of the active topics list?


Edited by Hodgman, 17 February 2013 - 12:51 AM.


#37 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 17 February 2013 - 09:12 AM

When hiring games staff though, you're basically commissioning a piece of art from an artisan plus inventor. Sure you can put a constraint on them as to when you'd like to be able to present/sell the piece, but mandating that the artisan/inventor be present at a desk of your choosing for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week is just silly, it's irrelevant to the work you've tasked them with. The way I see it, you're sponsoring these inventors in exchange for them to dedicate their minds to your cause. You pay their living expenses and top up their savings account, and in exchange you own the copyright over their creative output for that period.
If there's evidence that fixed 40 hour weeks and squabbling over break times and punctuality improve creative output, then sure, enforce those policies with an iron grip... otherwise, find out what does enhance the creative output of the people that you're sponsoring.

Just to give a real world counter example, I work on the east coast and a lot of our art is made in England, but we also work with people on the west coast. Most people need to be on call so the people in england aren't forced to stay late into the night and to be there later in case anybody on the west coast needs something from us.

It's easy to use the artist/inventor argument, but when that artist/inventor is inhibiting the other artists/inventors from doing the work you comissioned them for because they have a different schedule it's a problem most fairly solved by the, "be at work from x-y," solution.
 

p.s. is anyone else annoyed that every new vote in the poll bumps this thread back up to the top of the active topics list?

Yes. This always annoys me about polls. I brought it up once and someone said they were hesitant to change it because some people might care about new poll results.

#38 CC Ricers   Members   -  Reputation: 834

Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:51 PM

In my last full-time job all minutes are counted by the punch clock and we cannot be in later than 10 minutes late. This was a problem for my commute as it was 2 hours long from home to work. Needing to take three forms of public transportation lends to multiple possible points of error. So forget if the trains are late- that happened to me on two occasions, missing the hourly bus, so I ordered a cab out of my pocket money just so I can be there on time (it was at least 4 miles away from my last train stop so that eats away almost 1 hours' worth of salary).

 

Right now, as I'm on a contract, it feels almost the total opposite. I'm expected to come two or three days a week at the office but lately there have been no projects assigned to me, and I won't get my next one probably until the first week of March. So possibly because I'm a contractor on a pay-for-deliverables basis, my boss hasn't really given any notice or concern to me that I haven't been working.


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#39 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2509

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

p.s. is anyone else annoyed that every new vote in the poll bumps this thread back up to the top of the active topics list?

 

So that's what's happening! I kept seeing threads with no new posts bumped and thought I was going mad....


if you think programming is like sex, you probably haven't done much of either.-------------- - capn_midnight

#40 Memories are Better   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 769

Posted 09 March 2013 - 10:10 AM

I don't work but if I did I would likely be first one in and last one out, as long as the job was fun and if it wasn't I would quit.

 

At home my cat seems to take the role of being in charge and usually she gives me 5 - 15 mins to 'prepare' before she starts meowing / scratching things for attention.

 

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