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Where to begin? (C#)


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#1 dtg108   Members   -  Reputation: 394

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 05:39 PM

So I've looked around, but I can't find anywhere for learning C# from a beginner standpoint. I know NO programming terms or anything in general about programming. (If it helps, I use Unity 3D). Can anyone help?



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#2 kidman171   Members   -  Reputation: 498

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 06:52 PM

How in the world can you not find anything!? I googled "C# for the absolute beginner" and got tons of good hits! You can also search for c# books on amazon and you will get a lot of hits.

#3 TheSasquatch   Members   -  Reputation: 452

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 09:37 PM

If you have trouble finding C# learning material, keep in mind that Java is very, very similar. Learning material for the two, at least at a beginner level, is pretty interchangeable. That said, here's a bunch of free, college level intro-to-programming books--for C#--from Rob Miles.

 

http://www.csharpcourse.com/



#4 shay.yizhak   Members   -  Reputation: 163

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 02:31 AM

I'd recommend you buy a book from Amazon. Even a kindle version would do. They usually teach you eveything you need to know to get started.

 

You never heard this from me, but if you don't want to pay for a book, find a good one on amazon, and then download it through bittorrent or emule.



#5 Subtle_Wonders   Members   -  Reputation: 225

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:22 AM

So I've looked around, but I can't find anywhere for learning C# from a beginner standpoint. I know NO programming terms or anything in general about programming. (If it helps, I use Unity 3D). Can anyone help?

 

It's really hard for me to make any recommendations for C# since I don't normally study in it. What I can say is this: Java and C# go hand in hand when it comes to a style of coding. If you know Java, it's really easy to learn C# and to get by with a bad book. Unless someone can fill in any gaps here from my part, I do know a great deal of references for Java. If you could get by learning Java, you should be able to get by learning C# really quickly and really well.

 

For Java: Here's what I recommend:

  1. ISBN 0-13-283031-0, also comes in eBook format.
  2. Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/thenewboston?feature=g-subs-u

 

I suggest learning it until you reach a point where you can convert singly linked data structures into doubly linked data structures. While data structures may have little to do with game development (might be wrong about this), it has everything to do with OOD. Once you're at that point, C# should be smooth sailing to learn given that it is also a high level OOD language.

 

If someone can provide you a direct resource for C#, that may be better and more direct to what you want.



#6 shay.yizhak   Members   -  Reputation: 163

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:43 AM

I suggest learning it until you reach a point where you can convert singly linked data structures into doubly linked data structures. While data structures may have little to do with game development (might be wrong about this), it has everything to do with OOD. Once you're at that point, C# should be smooth sailing to learn given that it is also a high level OOD language.

 

Just to be clear: data structures have EVERYTHING to do with game development. It's is needed (and used) everywhere in your design and code.

 

Also, I disagree with the advice. It seems kinda silly to learn java, just to be able to make the transition to C#. Start with C# - it's easier and more popular. And the amount of resources available for it are amazing.



#7 Subtle_Wonders   Members   -  Reputation: 225

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:44 AM

How in the world can you not find anything!? I googled "C# for the absolute beginner" and got tons of good hits! You can also search for c# books on amazon and you will get a lot of hits.

 

I did too, and many of them were horrible. Unless you already know programming, it's hard to identify a bad book, but very easy to identify being confused, lost and unable to learn.  I'm sure his comment was simply a truncaded/generic version of the prior.

 

With that said, kidman171 has a valid point. When you start coding dtg108, the compiler will likely give you errors, but they won't tell you how to correctly do your job. While I'm sure there was just a communication error, you will want to get into the habbit of doing extensive researching.

 

However, it's also important to note that you should not be overly dependant on google. In the work environment, you can be in some situations where google is not an option.  This is where things like an API overview come in handy. e.g.,: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/

 

Buddy, if you could pull up an API overview and program from that reference, understand OOD, and understand how to implement libraries with their associated API overviews, you're in a good position to take on the role of programming of any kind.



#8 Subtle_Wonders   Members   -  Reputation: 225

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 05:10 AM

Truth requires readiness, and such was not the case here. I won't unkindly overlay unwanted information to unwanted viewing. As such, I pulled the text out of respect. Have a good day everyone.  smile.png


Edited by Subtle_Wonders, 15 February 2013 - 10:40 PM.


#9 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19023

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 05:46 AM

And we have left the area of helping a for beginner and entered the world of personal attacks. Let's stay focused on the topic.

@OP:

Best suggestions are to READ SIMILAR POSTS. The forum gets your exact question about twice each day. Search the forum first.
Next best suggestion is to search the web for variations of "c# beginner", "c# learning", "c# tutorial" and so on.
Next best suggestion is to get the books listed in other threads about learning the language.
Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#10 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:09 PM

So I've looked around, but I can't find anywhere for learning C# from a beginner standpoint. I know NO programming terms or anything in general about programming. (If it helps, I use Unity 3D). Can anyone help?

Just because I've been running into this myself, you're tackling an odd problem here.  I'm very comfortable in C# (see signature, for example), but recently jumped into Unity scripting, and there's a very different paradigm at play in Unity.  Your code doesn't *create* objects (for example, using the new() operator throws errors and warnings in the Unity IDE), it *IS* the object in many cases, and trying to script Unity like I write pure C# code just doesn't work in most cases.  So even if you get a good reference book or find a tutorial series that clicks with you, there's additional learning involved in applying C# to Unity.

 

I'm not saying it's a bad idea to find some references on the language, if you want to script with C# instead of javascript then it'll certainly be helpful!  Just know that the way C# is leveraged in Unity isn't exactly normal operating conditions.

 

All that being said, I still find this book to be very approachable.  If you're a visual learner, the author has a great style that I found easy to grasp.


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#11 Dan Mayor   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1712

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 04:04 PM

I'd recommend you buy a book from Amazon. Even a kindle version would do. They usually teach you eveything you need to know to get started.

 

You never heard this from me, but if you don't want to pay for a book, find a good one on amazon, and then download it through bittorrent or emule.

 

Might just be because I'm a bit of an author myself in my free time but you should always buy or donate to learning materials.  First off someone takes their valuable time to write something helpful for someone else and deserves some compensation for their time and effort and secondly the more you steal the less we offer.  Down vote for sure, never suggest someone pirate, steal or otherwise "rip off" anyone!

 

One more rant tip and I'll leave it be, there are ample free learning services that will at least get you started.  If these don't suffice spend the $20 or so it costs to buy a book that suits your learning style and needs.  You'll be amazed how much harder the "teacher" tries to convey his/her knowledge upon you when they are getting paid to do so.  Other than that as I mentioned in the "Programming Primer" I wrote in my journal, programming is a process of overcoming problems through reasoning, logic and above all researching and implementing solutions.  This is your first step young coder, learning to FIND material is nearly half the battle.  Finding material you understand, learning from it and implementing it is the other half.


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Dan Mayor - Dan@Digivance.com
 www.Digivance.com


#12 TheSasquatch   Members   -  Reputation: 452

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Posted 14 February 2013 - 10:22 PM

Down vote for sure, never suggest someone pirate, steal or otherwise "rip off" anyone!

 

Pretty thoroughly off topic at this point, and I'm sure I'm going to take a lot of crap for this, but I have to disagree. It's not nearly so black and white as you're making it out to be. There are plenty of cases where piracy--which is copyright infringement, not theft--is perfectly justified. With programming books, for instance, it's foolhardy to actually buy one without checking it out first, as so many of them are just absolutely terrible. I've wasted hundreds of dollars on books that just didn't live up to the promises they made in the handful of pages Amazon lets you preview. But yeah, when you find a good one, then you should buy it.



#13 Nypyren   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3742

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Posted 15 February 2013 - 06:30 PM

I'm kind of surprised nobody has mentioned MSDN. They have a C# language learning guide which steps you through a lot of stuff.

Download this:

http://www.microsoft.com/visualstudio/eng#downloads+d-express-windows-desktop

Then read this:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/67ef8sbd.aspx

Edited by Nypyren, 15 February 2013 - 06:34 PM.


#14 Satharis   Members   -  Reputation: 949

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Posted 16 February 2013 - 03:49 AM

As has been stated there is a variety of information for C# and a lot of tutorials, honestly learning coding isn't very cut and dry I personally read a thousand books and tutorials on and off over the years and it still took me reading -multiple- books for things to start to sink in.

 

Coding is like math in a lot of ways, it seems horribly alien and complex when you start but as you start to learn it, it all comes together and seems very simple how everything is connected at the core. My advice would be to pop open an IDE, find a tutorial talking about the very basics like variables and functions and things for C# and just start practicing.

 

You learn the most by breaking things, I swear.






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