Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

Interested in a FREE copy of HTML5 game maker Construct 2?

We'll be giving away three Personal Edition licences in next Tuesday's GDNet Direct email newsletter!

Sign up from the right-hand sidebar on our homepage and read Tuesday's newsletter for details!


We're also offering banner ads on our site from just $5! 1. Details HERE. 2. GDNet+ Subscriptions HERE. 3. Ad upload HERE.


Meteorite going down over russia


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
31 replies to this topic

#1 Madhed   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3073

Posted 15 February 2013 - 06:39 AM

So this just happened this morning.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/15/hundreds-injured-meteorite-russian-city-chelyabinsk

 

I think this is the best footage I have ever seen (has ever been recorded?) of a meteor entering the atmosphere. Hooray for cheap, modern technology!

It's amazing that the shockwave was able to break windows below and even collapse the roof of a factory, considering the trajectory probably went 20km or something above the ground! EDIT: 30-50km

 

I hope the people injured recover quickly, all the best wishes to them.

 

Edit: As Milcho pointed out, that was actually a meteor. Meteorites are the ones actually hitting the ground


Edited by Madhed, 15 February 2013 - 08:10 AM.


Sponsor:

#2 Icebone1000   Members   -  Reputation: 1111

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:19 AM

No one warned about it? No one knew the damage would be considerable (ppl injured), in the case someone detected the meteor?  "so dont worry, is not a missile" ?

Did they just hide the fact cause they could do nothing about it, so probably better not scaring anyone?

Thats so fucked up man, I though humans where well capable of detecting things like that



#3 Madhed   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3073

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:29 AM

From the information I gathered it was virtually impossible to detect:

 

- Relatively small

- Fast moving

- Coming from the direction of the sun



#4 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30893

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:39 AM

Yeah from what little I know about this stuff, we only track the big ones that will wipe out a city/state/civilization, and we most surely haven't even found all of them yet.



#5 Milcho   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1177

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:56 AM

I know a lot of people were hurt, and this isn't in disrespect to them, but holy smokes was that amazing!

 

I used to go out in the desert in Arizona to watch any meteor showers I could see, and they're just little tiny streaks in the sky, but this is a lot more fascinating to watch.

I know that there's a number of similar but smaller events that occur somewhat commonly on Earth, but its always cool to see such a big meteor on footage.

Also, wasn't it Meteor if it doesn't hit the ground, and meteorite if it does? 

 

And on a hilarious note, one of the Russian party leaders apparently called this "a test of new American weapons,"



#6 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4549

Posted 15 February 2013 - 07:56 AM

Whoa. I don't know what I would do in such situation. Either stay put and be friggin' scared, or grab a car and try to see the site of the impact :D


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#7 Madhed   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3073

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:05 AM

Also, wasn't it Meteor if it doesn't hit the ground, and meteorite if it does?

 

I guess you're right. Apparently, I don't know anything about that stuff... let's just call it a space rock.



#8 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2894

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:09 AM

Even the huge ones surprise us sometimes, if they come from the wrong angle. Space is a very big and very empty place.

And objects like this can have very long cycles, meaning they only pass within detectable ranges every few thousand years or so.

 

It's not at all unthinkable that we would only get a few months or weeks warning before a flying mountain slams into us.

It's a very real danger to our life on earth, and one of the reasons space exploration is vital for our survival as a species.



#9 Milcho   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1177

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:10 AM

I guess you're right.

Well, i don't know - i'm asking cause even the site you linked calls it a meteorite (and presumably the Guardian, which is somewhat reputable i guess, does its research). 

I'm not sure of the exact classifications, like for example, if the meteor breaks up and pieces fall to the ground - are those pieces meteorites or is the meteor now called meteorite?

 

Space is a very big and very empty place.

This doesn't necessarily apply to floating rocks and such, but space being very empty makes some types of detection easier. What I'm thinking of is that one site that talked about no stealth in space - but it was generally based on radiation differences - so an object that has a significant (a few dozen kelvin?) temperature difference from space (which is near 2 Kelvin or so) should be easily detectable... at least in theory.


Edited by Milcho, 15 February 2013 - 08:14 AM.


#10 Olof Hedman   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2894

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:12 AM

Well, no i'm asking cause even the site you linked calls it a meteorite (and presumably the Guardian, which is somewhat reputable i guess, does its research). 

I'm not sure of the exact classifications, like for example, if the meteor breaks up and pieces fall to the ground - are those pieces meteorites or is the meteor now called meteorite?

 

http://www.beedictionary.com/common-errors/meteor_vs_meteorite_vs_meteoroid

 

 

I'm not at all surprised over news outlets getting that wrong... They commonly confuse "galaxy" with "solar system"... (thats like confusing planets with grains of sand...)


Edited by Olof Hedman, 15 February 2013 - 08:13 AM.


#11 noisecrime   Members   -  Reputation: 738

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:17 AM

Hmm. Ok i'm confused,

 

Russian Metor 30-50Km above ground, caused massive fireball and (probably) exploded in the air.

 

2012 DA14 will pass within about 17,200 miles, thats approx 27Km, but nothing to worry about!

 

What am I missing here? (apart from my morning coffee ;) )



#12 Milcho   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1177

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:27 AM

What am I missing here?

From a quick google search: 

The asteroid will pass 27,700 km (17,200 mi) from the surface of Earth.

So.. perhaps a factor of 1000? :)



#13 Madhed   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3073

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:27 AM

What am I missing here?

 

You are missing a few decimals.

17,200 miles is approx. 27,000Km wink.png



#14 Stormynature   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3387

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:27 AM

Interesting meteorite falls



#15 noisecrime   Members   -  Reputation: 738

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:47 AM

Opps, thanks Madhed and Milcho. In my head I treated 50km as 50,000km for some stupid reason. I knew something was wrong, just couldn't see it - I blame lack of coffee ;)

 

At least the Earth is safe for another day ;)


Edited by noisecrime, 15 February 2013 - 08:47 AM.


#16 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2171

Posted 15 February 2013 - 08:48 AM

30-50 km? That looked something like a few hundred meters on the video.

 

Pretty cool though. I'd love to see something like that.



#17 JTippetts   Moderators   -  Reputation: 8570

Posted 15 February 2013 - 10:21 AM

Milcho, on 15 Feb 2013 - 07:03, said:
And on a hilarious note, one of the Russian party leaders apparently called this "a test of new American weapons,"[/size]

Better watch out Russia. We're gonna break ALL the windows.

#18 aditd   Members   -  Reputation: 127

Posted 15 February 2013 - 12:20 PM

I also saw the video and uaaauu! That closed, right next to us? Makes you wonder how fast the dinosaurs disappeared.


Coupon Site Script - Turnkey Affiliate Moneymaking Business

#19 CC Ricers   Members   -  Reputation: 639

Posted 15 February 2013 - 03:40 PM

Things like this remind me of how vulnerable we still are from these dangers.  Tracking the big ones is one thing, but do we still have a ways to go from being able to plan the mitigation of future impacts from them?


My development blog: Electronic Meteor

#20 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 20255

Posted 15 February 2013 - 04:35 PM


Milcho, on 15 Feb 2013 - 07:03, said:
And on a hilarious note, one of the Russian party leaders apparently called this "a test of new American weapons,"[/size]

Better watch out Russia. We're gonna break ALL the windows.


Petty vandalism, ftw!
...but we forgot to spray-paint "Kilroy was here" on the meteor.
It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.
All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.
Of Stranger Flames - [indie turn-based rpg set in a para-historical French colony] | Indie RPG development journal

[Fly with me on Twitter] [Google+] [My broken website]

[Need web hosting? I personally like A Small Orange]





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS