Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


5 Best Video Game Consoles in History


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
11 replies to this topic

#1 senseinobu   Members   -  Reputation: 101

Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:38 PM

<<url removed>>
 
Interesting list, though I would have liked to have seen Sega Genesis in there. How would you rank them?

Edited by phantom, 19 February 2013 - 05:05 PM.
Turning up on a site to promote your own is not cool...


Sponsor:

#2 Mussi   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1699

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:00 PM

What's so interesting about it?

#3 ChaosEngine   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2138

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:10 PM

Wow, that's a terrible website. Horrible layout, terrible writing and completely unfunny "humourous articles".

 

As for the list, kinda surprised to see the dreamcast in there and the absence of the NES.

 

Greatest of all time will always be subjective, but in terms of impact on the world, I'd go with something like.

 

 

5: Genesis/Megadrive or PS2: Kinda cheating here both either would fit in this category. Both represented a significant step up from the previous generation in terms of visual fidelity.

4: Gameboy: Because it sold more than the bible

3: Xbox 360: first console to really embrace online multiplayer.

2. Wii: introduced gaming to a much wider audience.

1. NES: introduced gaming to the mass market. Spawned most of Nintendos iconic IPs which are still with us today.
 


if you think programming is like sex, you probably haven't done much of either.-------------- - capn_midnight

#4 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 18836

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:17 PM

Best is obviously subjective. The article says "best 5 video game consoles ever made for their time", and then hits only the previous four generations of consoles.

I'd dig back deeper:

I'd say:
1. Atari 2600. It made home video games commonplace. For nearly ten years after its release, "Atari" was synonymous with "video games", much like "ipad" is currently synonymous with tablets computer. Even after the collapse of the industry in 1983, it continued to be a major player for a relatively long time in the industry. The brand built from this console still has considerable financial value.

2. Original NES. It took over where the 2600 left off. It revitalized the industry after the 1983 crash. Everyone on the board should be familiar with how it took off.

3. Odyssey. Every story has a beginning, and the Odyssey is the video game console's beginning. We still use most of the same concepts today. It connected to a standard TV rather than a special cabinet or vector screen. It used two controllers. It had a "light gun" pointing device. It had interchangeable games (in the form of cartridges). These same concepts can still be found in most modern consoles.

I would put Nintendo DS next, but it is usually relegated to a handheld device rather than a console. With 153.7 million sales (including the DS, DS Lite, DSi, DSiXL, etc) and growing, it has the highest sales of any device.

4. PS2. With a lifetime of 13 years in production and 153.6 million sales, it comes in a very close second to the DS in terms of availability. It was transformative in its use of graphics processing and other features.

5. Dreamcast. It offered a great deal of hardware, far beyond its time. It is still widely used in the older homebrew community because of the ease of development relative to the game-making power.

Honorable Mention: Vectrex. The arcade systems at the time relied mostly on vector graphics hardware, but the early game systems plugged in to traditional televisions. This presented the biggest visual difference between the arcade and the home console. Smooth angles and curves were so much nicer than even today's anti-aliased content. Granted, the technology is cumbersome and not really compatible with modern ideas of graphics, but still the system turned a LOT of heads and was a powerful influence on the industry at the time. The Vectrex gave arcade-quality graphics to the home user, and many people took notice.
Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#5 00Kevin   Members   -  Reputation: 222

Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:54 PM

1. Atari 2600  (the system that started it all.  There would be no Mario without Donkey Kong.)

2. Original NES 

3. Sega Genesis (was launched a few years before SNES which gave it a huge edge for a while)

4. Sega Master System (superior to NES in terms of technology - no thrid party games killed it)
5. ColecoVision (a very popular system at the time)



From that point forward consoles machines dominated and the coin Arcades died quick death.

I would not include the Dreamcast or PS1 in that top 5 list because at the time everyone was using their PC for gaming. Remember the 3dfx Voodoo cards (Quake, doom, duke)?

In fact, people did not return to the console machines until the PS2 and Xbox systems were released and they had comparable capabilities to PC games. In fact, I was not willing to pay money for what was basically a less powerful computer and still have to wait for the CD to load the game resources, I guess I was spoiled with the ROM cartridges

At the moment, I know many people who are no longer interested in Console gaming and returning to PC gaming, with load times, graphics, etc being some of those reasons. Hopefully that will change with the new XBOX.

I just love how the industry is starting to repeat itself.


Edited by 00Kevin, 19 February 2013 - 03:01 PM.


#6 CC Ricers   Members   -  Reputation: 623

Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:27 PM

I would not include the Dreamcast or PS1 in that top 5 list because at the time everyone was using their PC for gaming. Remember the 3dfx Voodoo cards (Quake, doom, duke)?


In fact, people did not return to the console machines until the PS2 and Xbox systems were released and they had comparable capabilities to PC games.
 

 

It depends on the region in the market. In North America, consoles were consistently selling well since the 3rd generation, which is not to say that THE PC market wasn't prosperous either. In Europe, PCs took a larger share of the market.

 

Most gamers I know had a console in the 5th generation (mostly PS1 over N64), so I am placing my anecdotal evidence against yours. I don't consider the PS1-Dreamcast era a "dead area" in console history, unless you count the alternative platforms that used CD based media (like Philips CD-i or 3DO) mostly for full-motion video for interaction, before 3D came into its own. That was a technological dead end.

 

In my opinion, the SNES was one of the best consoles of its time, bringing in a large variety of genres and styles to play with. N64 had many good games too, but its selection was underwhelming compared to SNES.


Dreamcast is also iconic to many. In retrospect, it had less to offer than the PS2, but what made it so popular was that a lot of arcade favorites were available for the system, and at a time when US arcades were hitting their twilight years.


My development blog: Electronic Meteor

#7 00Kevin   Members   -  Reputation: 222

Posted 19 February 2013 - 03:58 PM

I would not include the Dreamcast or PS1 in that top 5 list because at the time everyone was using their PC for gaming. Remember the 3dfx Voodoo cards (Quake, doom, duke)?


In fact, people did not return to the console machines until the PS2 and Xbox systems were released and they had comparable capabilities to PC games.
 

 

It depends on the region in the market. In North America, consoles were consistently selling well since the 3rd generation, which is not to say that THE PC market wasn't prosperous either. In Europe, PCs took a larger share of the market.

 

Most gamers I know had a console in the 5th generation (mostly PS1 over N64), so I am placing my anecdotal evidence against yours. I don't consider the PS1-Dreamcast era a "dead area" in console history, unless you count the alternative platforms that used CD based media (like Philips CD-i or 3DO) mostly for full-motion video for interaction, before 3D came into its own. That was a technological dead end.

 

In my opinion, the SNES was one of the best consoles of its time, bringing in a large variety of genres and styles to play with. N64 had many good games too, but its selection was underwhelming compared to SNES.


Dreamcast is also iconic to many. In retrospect, it had less to offer than the PS2, but what made it so popular was that a lot of arcade favorites were available for the system, and at a time when US arcades were hitting their twilight years.

 

I agree.   I'm not saying the dreamcast was a dead era or that the SNES wasn't popular.   I just think they didn't offer anything new.  The SNES did well because it was riding on the coattails of the NES.  In addition, Nintendo sat on their inferior NES for several years while the Sega Genesis thrived (much like what they are doing today lol).   For that reason, I'd have pick the Genesis over the SNES because it was the first system to truly bring arcade quality graphics to the home, in fact after that system I didn't go to the arcades anymore.

 

At the time when the dreamcast came out your age had a lot to do with what systems you played.     Previous to that, you played what the market had on the shelf and most people didn't have a PC during the late 80's.   



#8 Servant of the Lord   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 17069

Posted 19 February 2013 - 04:16 PM

I really liked my GameBoy Advance SP (the SP version of the GBA) - I think it's form factor was very nice.

Backlighting of the screen, flip-up "laptop-like" form with a heavy duty hinge. Compact, amazing graphics, great games.

I have large hands, so my hands were slightly cramped - I suppose the wider Nintendo DS improved on it by being wider, but I never owned a DS.

 

The Dreamcast was awesome, but without many games, and I think the PlayStation 2 really improved and refined the first PlayStation.

 

I started with the N64, so my experience doesn't go any farther back.


Edited by Servant of the Lord, 19 February 2013 - 04:22 PM.

It's perfectly fine to abbreviate my username to 'Servant' rather than copy+pasting it all the time.

[Fly with me on Twitter] [Google+] [My broken website]

All glory be to the Man at the right hand... On David's throne the King will reign, and the Government will rest upon His shoulders. All the earth will see the salvation of God.                                                                                                                                                       [Need free cloud storage? I personally like DropBox]

Of Stranger Flames - [indie turn-based rpg set in a para-historical French colony] | Indie RPG development journal


#9 phantom   Moderators   -  Reputation: 6786

Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:06 PM

So, the OP's link has been removed because it is his site and frankly rocking up on someone else's site to promote your own (and act like you 'found' it) is not cool.

The thread itself can live however as you guys have a discussion going on...

So, as you were gentlemen!
*salutes*

#10 jwezorek   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1606

Posted 19 February 2013 - 05:34 PM

Honorable Mention: Vectrex. 

 

Always wanted to own, or at least see, one of these things.


Edited by jwezorek, 19 February 2013 - 05:35 PM.


#11 jms bc   Members   -  Reputation: 415

Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:06 PM

I nominate Mattel's Intellivision for a classic set -- I think the controllers allowed for more complicated games than you could find on the Atari in those days. I still think of Utopia as the single cell ancestor of nation/city building genres. Also, I learned how to play blackjack and bet on horses on that thing.


The Four Musketeers of Happiness have left.


#12 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2043

Posted 20 February 2013 - 07:49 PM

My list:

 

1. GameWatch - The beginning of handheld video gaming.

2. Atari2600 - The beginning of home console.

3. Nintendo - A lot of good games started from here (Zelda, Metroid, etc.)

4. Sega Genesis - The beginning of 16-bit gaming, and broke a lot of 8-bit limitations.  Sonic platforming technology was such a huge improvement over Mario, for example.  A lot of games that were only available on the arcades were portable to this console.

5. Xbox360 + Kinect - Tough choices between all the modern consoles (N64, PS, PS2, PS3, Cube, Wii, Xbox), but I think Xbox with Kinect wins.  The need of not using a controller spawns new genres of video games.


Edited by alnite, 20 February 2013 - 07:51 PM.





Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS