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What arent you good at drawing?


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#1 Wickedrob   Members   -  Reputation: 181

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:23 PM

I draw like a 2nd grader...okay 1st grader but I'm very passionate and I hope to get as good as I can.
There's some actual really good artist on this site and I was wondering what were some of problems you guys run into or just have difficulty drawing



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#2 sunandshadow   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5057

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:31 AM

I had trouble with people for a long time, and I'm still not very good at faces.  Also my shading sucks, as does my (lack of) ability to use a harmonious palette for a more complicated painting or character with background.


Phone game idea available free to someone who will develop it (Alphadoku game - the only existing phone game of this type is both for windows phone only and awful. PM for details.)


I want to help design a "sandpark" MMO. Optional interactive story with quests and deeply characterized NPCs, plus sandbox elements like player-craftable housing and lots of other crafting. If you are starting a design of this type, please PM me. I also love pet-breeding games.


#3 Hamsta   Members   -  Reputation: 943

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 10:36 AM

Anatomy, Likeness (as in someone's facial features) capturing movement, moving beyond the sketch into a polished piece, line art, architecture...

Seems like the better I become, the more I realize I need to improve. Kind of like science, as soon as you solve one problem, 10 more pop in it's place.


Itamar Reiner: Self Financed Concept Artist http://www.hamsta180.com

#4 DaveTroyer   Members   -  Reputation: 1052

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 12:32 PM

One problem I face is shading. I understand the concepts and when I actually do it, I'm pretty good at it, but I usually don't just because I prefer to work very quickly or get requests for cartoon stuff.

 

In order to help me combat my lack of shading if a piece calls for it, I only do very light lines (or use a guide layer if purely digital) to help with the shape then I use shading exclusively to flesh out the illustration. I also try to illustrate in a more painterly fashion; to block out shapes with my brush and have little to no lines while adding detail with light and shadow.

 

If you'd like to improve your drawing skills, I'd suggest trying new things like getting a fat-tipped felt marker (and some thick paper so it doesn't bleed through too bad) and try to draw something you see without taking the marker off the paper. Also, try going faster and don't stress too much over making your lines perfect.

 

Oh and maybe watch some youtube videos of artists drawing stuff. It doesn't need to be tutorial videos because they take longer, but just watching some artwork get made will help you to see their process and might teach you a couple of tricks.biggrin.png

 

I guess that's just some advice I can give. 

Good luck!


Check out my game blog - Dave's Game Blog


#5 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1288

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 01:47 PM

I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.



#6 sunandshadow   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5057

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 03:48 PM

I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.

Well, some people are "visual learners" and some aren't, if that's what you mean.  There are people who have mild mental or physical problems that interfere with drawing, and they might not even realize it.  Dyspraxia is a learning disability related to motor skills, there are an assortment of visual perception and processing disorders, physical eye problems which mess with depth perception or color perception, and physical hand/muscle problems like palsy and arthritis which mess with executing fine motor skills.  Oh, and the genetic balance of fast twitch to slow twitch muscles.


Phone game idea available free to someone who will develop it (Alphadoku game - the only existing phone game of this type is both for windows phone only and awful. PM for details.)


I want to help design a "sandpark" MMO. Optional interactive story with quests and deeply characterized NPCs, plus sandbox elements like player-craftable housing and lots of other crafting. If you are starting a design of this type, please PM me. I also love pet-breeding games.


#7 FLeBlanc   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3117

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:06 PM

I can't even draw a straight line on a piece of paper... it must be the way that people interpret the world that describes whether or not they are good at drawing.

 

Almost nobody can draw a straight line on a piece of paper. The ability to do so is not the mark of an artist.

 

I see drawing to be a lot like writing, or really any sort of creative endeavor. I think that a lot more people can do it than think they can. Sure, you'll need a lot of inborn "talent" to be great, and sure some people are going to be extremely bad, but I believe that the vast majority of people fall in between these two extremes, and that no matter how bad you think you may be there is always the possibility for improvement.

 

It just takes work, that's all. First, forget about how bad you are, forget about how badly you want to be good. Just pick up a pencil and draw what you see. If it looks like shit, ball it up and chuck it in the fireplace, grab another sheet and try again. The good artists are the ones that hang in there until their stuff stops looking so much like shit. That's the big secret.



#8 Komatsu   Members   -  Reputation: 404

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:23 PM

I hate when people say or think you have to be talented to draw. Its an instant dismissal of all the hard work any artists puts into his work. like it was effortless and required no work to get where they are.

 

I am just a beginner but I have seen improvement just from practicing. you can too.



#9 TheSasquatch   Members   -  Reputation: 452

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:24 AM

I have some kind of bizarre mental block against drawing people. Walking mass of psychological complexes that I am, any attempt at doing so--if, by some miracle, I manage to bring myself to actually let the pen touch the paper--will be immediately followed by compulsively destroying the inevitably failed drawing. I... really need to get over that, but I have no idea how.

 

I'm bad at animals, too. No particular psychological complex at work there, I've just never really practiced and they turn out poorly. Except insects. Somehow, they just make sense to me.

 

Landscapes, buildings, objects--no problem. I actually got my first degree in architecture (protip: don't get a degree in architecture), and have been known to undertake the occasional large-scale (24x36"+) drawing of various interesting buildings (I particularly enjoy gothic architecture and intricate stonework). Perspective usually isn't a problem, and I've found various ways of coping with anything particularly complex (my go-to method being to simply model a similar generic shape in 3D and use it as a guide).

 

I actually shade compulsively, usually with a pen. I stick with physical paper notes rather than my laptop in my grad school classes for this reason--the margins of each page end up completely filled with gradients and assorted 3D objects long before the page itself. It's practically an addiction, and I tend get strange looks from classmates.

 

Almost nobody can draw a straight line on a piece of paper. The ability to do so is not the mark of an artist.

 

Heh, I had a professor that could do the DaVinci thing, where you hold your arm straight out and draw a perfect circle on a chalkboard. He could also write in a nearly flawless gothic font, backwards, and in a shockingly accurate spiral. It was pretty impressive. But no, he wasn't born with that ability--the guy kept a pencil in his hand all day, every day, and had for most of his life.


Edited by TheSasquatch, 23 February 2013 - 01:30 AM.


#10 epicpunnum   Members   -  Reputation: 458

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:51 AM

Personally, I'm iffy with perspectives (3-point especially), some architecture, and likenesses, as Hamsta said. For some reason, realistic mouths and eyes allude me, and so a lot of my style avoids that. I still try and practice it, but I certainly don't publish it.
But I think what I am worst at above anything else is CARS. I don't know why, but I have NEVER drawn a good car in my life, unless it's an antique car like a Ford Model T. I feel like it just has something to do with the smoothness of it all.  Without any really clear lines to define it, I can never quite get the shape right given my perspective; and even if I do, I'm still not accustomed to the design/features of them.

As for the conversation that seems to be going around about being good at art:
Honestly, I'm not all too good. I am however, proud of what I can do - which is more or less 12 years of my childhood absently doodling and reading up about things I wasn't sure of. If I had to say anything on the fact, is that to get better, there really is no easy way. I see tons of people who don't try and expect it to be handed to them. I sincerely doubt anyone was born able to draw some of the amazing art you see on the Internet today.

Just practice, be patient, look to life, and don't rush your work. Make stupid faces in the mirror and draw them as a smiley face so that you can get emotion. Discover proportionality. Look up tutorials for pretty much anything you want. Make comic strips - it'll make your characters more consistent. Review every doodle you make to see what can be better. No matter how you practice - so long as you're practicing - you WILL get better. You can strive to be like one of those amazing artists, just don't expect it to come instantly.



#11 jwezorek   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1974

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 04:06 AM

There are two faculties that contribute to drawing well. They're heavily interdependent but in many ways seperate too. (1) is eye. (2) is hands. 
 
(1) is the ability to look at the world in 3D, or visualize it when drawing from imagination, and project what you see mentally into 2D. It's also the ability to look at a 2D drawing, that you did or someone else did, and see what is wrong with it -- if you have a good eye, the errors just jump out of the paper and then you fix them.
 
(2) is the ability to put down on paper what you see in (1). It is the ability to use pencil, pen, charcoal, or whatever, to physically construct an image.
 
In my experience, (2) is more amendable to study and practice and taking classes and so forth. There are a lot of tricks to various media that it helps to just have someone teach you i.e. "okay, here's how you paint hair with oil", etc. (1) tends more to be something that you either have or you don't -- although lots of people will disagree with me on this and start saying how you really can train your eye. For the record, I don't disagree but I still think it's pretty clear that (1) has a strong innate component in people who are really good artists.
 
Personally I've always had a better eye than hands. Probably because the course my life took never let me spend a lot of time making art as an adult. It's really something you have to do daily if you want to be good.


#12 BagelHero   Members   -  Reputation: 1482

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 04:51 AM

Wow, it's weird seeing people who profess to being bad at drawing people. I think I need to get out more

I'm at my best and entirely in my comfort zone drawing most people. Big people, small people, humanoid not-quite-people (satyrs, fairies, ogres etc). It's how I've wired my brain because I draw them so much

 

...It also means my attempts at non-organic structures (architecture, levels, most weapons, vehicles) are... lackluster.
That, and my eye for mixing colors by hand. Can't do it. Not at all.

 

But I'm a firm believer that most people can learn how, as long as they want to, and draw almost every waking moment. If you want to draw that epic idea for a monster you had, you should do it. It won't turn out exactly as you imagine, but eventually you'll get better and will be able to reiterate it.

Happy drawing!



#13 sunandshadow   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5057

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 04:12 PM

Wow, it's weird seeing people who profess to being bad at drawing people. I think I need to get out more

I'm at my best and entirely in my comfort zone drawing most people. Big people, small people, humanoid not-quite-people (satyrs, fairies, ogres etc). It's how I've wired my brain because I draw them so much.

It is mostly about time spent.  I've drawn animals/monster and plants since I was in elementary school, so that's what I'm most comfortable with.  Both people and architecture/perspective/machinery are more challenging for me because I started later.  Though, I do think people are a subject where audiences are hypersensitive to small errors because our brains evolved to pay minute attention to the appearances of those around us, both their emotions and the health/age/ethnicity, etc.  When drawing monsters I'm much less likely to hear comments on details like where the eyes are placed in the face, or comments that a supposedly masculine animal looks too feminine, but I hear that kind of thing all the time (and have said it myself) about drawings of people.


Phone game idea available free to someone who will develop it (Alphadoku game - the only existing phone game of this type is both for windows phone only and awful. PM for details.)


I want to help design a "sandpark" MMO. Optional interactive story with quests and deeply characterized NPCs, plus sandbox elements like player-craftable housing and lots of other crafting. If you are starting a design of this type, please PM me. I also love pet-breeding games.


#14 sunandshadow   Moderators   -  Reputation: 5057

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 04:15 PM

There are two faculties that contribute to drawing well. They're heavily interdependent but in many ways seperate too. (1) is eye. (2) is hands. 
 
(1) is the ability to look at the world in 3D, or visualize it when drawing from imagination, and project what you see mentally into 2D. It's also the ability to look at a 2D drawing, that you did or someone else did, and see what is wrong with it -- if you have a good eye, the errors just jump out of the paper and then you fix them.
 
(2) is the ability to put down on paper what you see in (1). It is the ability to use pencil, pen, charcoal, or whatever, to physically construct an image.
 
In my experience, (2) is more amendable to study and practice and taking classes and so forth. There are a lot of tricks to various media that it helps to just have someone teach you i.e. "okay, here's how you paint hair with oil", etc. (1) tends more to be something that you either have or you don't -- although lots of people will disagree with me on this and start saying how you really can train your eye. For the record, I don't disagree but I still think it's pretty clear that (1) has a strong innate component in people who are really good artists.
 
Personally I've always had a better eye than hands. Probably because the course my life took never let me spend a lot of time making art as an adult. It's really something you have to do daily if you want to be good.

Well, it's a bit more complex than those two - have you ever met an autistic artist who can only draw from reality or memory and has great difficulty making up anything original?  They might have great eyes and great hands but the visual imagination or design ability is lacking.


Phone game idea available free to someone who will develop it (Alphadoku game - the only existing phone game of this type is both for windows phone only and awful. PM for details.)


I want to help design a "sandpark" MMO. Optional interactive story with quests and deeply characterized NPCs, plus sandbox elements like player-craftable housing and lots of other crafting. If you are starting a design of this type, please PM me. I also love pet-breeding games.


#15 Bearhugger   Members   -  Reputation: 567

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 07:25 PM

Right now I suck at drawing most things. After I picked a new job in 2009 I lost the time to draw, and now I'm quite rusted - and the rustier I am, the faster I give up. It's a psychological downward spiral. =(  Eventually, I'd like to get back to drawing though.

 

That said, even when I was better, I was never good at drawing animals. No matter how hard I tried, I couldn't draw a realistic horse, cat, wolf, dog, tiger, etc. I have a wolf-man character in my game who has a wolf pet, and I thought I could draw it... such a failure, I have never seen! =P

 

I was pretty good at drawing realistic people though, and I loved drawing fantasy costumes and armors. I have a stack of artpads full of old character designs. (Although mostly women. =P)



#16 CreepyCode   Members   -  Reputation: 129

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 07:04 AM

i do faces and bodies pretty well... i mean, that's what i draw most of the time. I sometimes have problems with water/lava/fire, since they are quite hard to draw. also sometimes trees and stuff like that
 
Just keep drawing stuff and you will get better...
 
and for some tutorials (well... in manga style anyway) you can check:
mark crilley's channel



#17 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3679

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 12:56 AM

I'm terrible at people through lack of practice backed by lack of interest- character design was never really my thing. My favorite Star Wars character growing up was probably the Super Star Destroyer... 

 

I also am not very good at perspective since I have a hard time dealing with the lack of perfection that often results. I used to be the same with lighting shading but have managed to practice enough do a reasonable job.

 

Here's my deviantart for reference: http://prinzeugn.deviantart.com/ Note the lack of organics and works heavy on perspective.


-Mark the Artist

Digital Art and Technical Design
Developer Journal


#18 MSW   Members   -  Reputation: 151

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 10:17 AM

I suck at drawing hair and facial expressions. My devianart: http://msw.deviantart.com/


My deviantART: http://msw.deviantart.com/


#19 BCullis   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1813

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:21 PM

Color.

Black and white makes value correction so much easier.  And I've been reliant on using lines (and more recently lineweights) to describe forms.  The second I jump to color, I have issues with palette selection and loss of value range (the white-to-black scale).  It's on my current "to study and practice" list.

 

Also it's not specific to a topic, but I have trouble finishing drawings and paintings.  I leave a lot of sketches half-polished.  The looseness of the sketch lets me see what I wanted in the image, while obscuring the elements that weren't clearly defined in my head, or that I didn't want to bother finding reference for.  This can more easily be described as "laziness". :P


Hazard Pay :: FPS/RTS in SharpDX
DeviantArt :: Because right-brain needs love too

#20 TheSasquatch   Members   -  Reputation: 452

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 10:23 PM

Also it's not specific to a topic, but I have trouble finishing drawings and paintings. I leave a lot of sketches half-polished. The looseness of the sketch lets me see what I wanted in the image, while obscuring the elements that weren't clearly defined in my head, or that I didn't want to bother finding reference for.

 

I have that same problem with design, programming, essentially everything--once my curiousity is satisfied, that's it. I'm bored. It doesn't get finished, and I move on to whatever gets my attention next. I have a terrible feeling that I'll get the game I'm working on just far enough to see that the engine is working properly, then lose interest and never actually add any content. It's a 2D game, you see, and I have a copy of 3D Game Programming with DirectX11 (Frank Luna) on my desk, taunting me, saying "Two dimensions? Pfft. I have three. Read me." It's maddening.

 

Anyway, I bought a sketchbook today with the intention of trying to get over my phobia of drawing people. I think most of it is rooted in a fear of criticism, or some such nonsense, hence why I'll limit my practice to this one discrete sketchbook that no one but me will ever see (it's identical to several others I have, and won't stand out amongst them). Ideally, I'll improve enough that I'll no longer be ashamed of the drawings and they'll feel just like architectural or landscape drawings do--I welcome criticism with those; it's praise I can't handle. At all. ...I should probably just see a therapist.






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