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An aspie in need


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#1 Mastermind89   Members   -  Reputation: 126

Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:39 PM

GameDev,

 

 

My name is Noah Bangs. For as long as I've been on these forums, some people have criticized me for being inexperienced or some other reason. I tried multiple times to get help, but there was nothing. I updated my profile saying that I have Asperger Syndrome, even posted about it.

 

People might look at me with a different perspective now. My disability hinders my learning, and its heartbreaking. But my desire to get video games done never died.

 

 

Nobody, especially people with disabilities, deserve to be judged, criticized or anything else.

 

 

I can't make video games by myself. That is why I try each time to gather help. I am trying one last time to attempt to raise money, only this time it's for my sake. I don't want to live in shallow places and work dead end jobs my whole life. I want to be somebody.

 

 

Call me whatever you want, but you have to admit that I never gave up. If you want, fund my cause at the link below.

 

{Removed by moderator}

 

 

God bless,

 

Noah Bangs


Edited by frob, 25 February 2013 - 04:34 PM.
Removing spam link


Sponsor:

#2 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 18879

Posted 25 February 2013 - 04:39 PM

Noah, I've looked over your past posts.

 

Most of them are announcements that you plan to release massive projects.  Most of them would be multi-million dollar, multi-year endeavors.

 

Many of them are solicitations for money.

 

Nobody cares about Asperger's or any other issues.  I know lots of professional developers with mental and physical issues.  I even know several quadrapalegics in the games industry --- one only has partial use of three fingers on one hand, yet he is able to create great things.  This is not an issue of prejudice against disabilities.

 

 

If you want to make games, then MAKE GAMES.  That means you need to actually learn to create code, or learn to create models, or learn to create animations.

 

Instead of talking about your big plans and ideas how about you spend some time actually creating something of value?  Anybody can talk big about their big ideas.  The successful ones actually do something about it.

 

 

 

If you want people to help you out on your projects you will need to start by creating the project to help with.  That doesn't mean just creating a kickstarter page.  It means actively developing something large enough that people can contribute to.


Edited by frob, 25 February 2013 - 04:41 PM.

Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#3 ranakor   Members   -  Reputation: 439

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:49 PM

Yea, if you've been waiting long you may also be struggling with what to learn after taking too many tracks so i'll sugest one, no need to argue wether it's the best as that's not the point, but it's a track and fairly quickly rewarding which seems to be what you need.

 

Download unity 3D (free) and bite the $20 that it costs to buy a subscribtion to digital tutors & start watching their videos on unity, you've got like a week's worth of content on there including how to make a game from scratch to end IIRC.



#4 ranakor   Members   -  Reputation: 439

Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:53 PM

And you can't "be somebody", by just saying i want money, i agree with the previous poster, don't ask for money, do things yourselves, no one you've heard of (or almost no one) who is "somebody" started on forums saying "give me money". They started by studying subject, people who "are somebody" are people who are able to get things done, not everyone is able to do so, but no one can fix that for you.

 

Now if you explain clearly how your disability hinders your learning, there may be some alternative learning options, but just getting money out of thin air won't work because 1) people have no reasons to give you money, people with experience who already proved they get things done have to sell themselves pretty good to get funding, so no luck at someone with no experience stating he couldn't get anything done and 2) because even if someone did give you money, it wouldn't change squat, you wouldn't be any more able to do video games, you'd go from unable to do video games to unable to do videogames + having money.



#5 DevLiquidKnight   Members   -  Reputation: 834

Posted 25 February 2013 - 08:10 PM

To put this simply, your not the only one on this forum with an autism spectrum disorder I am sure there are many others. It is very common in the technological industry. Other people with the same problems do fine without any financial support to start a game. There are tons of free game engines, you can start with.

 

I would recommend in the future you should probably go about having someone you close to in real life review what you post before you post it. Asking for money wont get you anywhere, if you think you need money that badly get a loan, or grant.

 

And ideally work with counselors on alleviating your symptoms of autism, otherwise you will be struggling in the real world as well.


Edited by DevLiquidKnight, 26 February 2013 - 12:10 AM.


#6 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3205

Posted 25 February 2013 - 08:11 PM

http://www.gamedev.net/topic/633565-why-i-post-a-lot-of-game-ideas/

 

did you take nothing from that post you made several months ago?

 

i don't know what it is you expected, but your going to simply get the exact same responses you got last time you brought up this topic(and now u've pretty much asked people to contribute to fund your life.)


Edited by slicer4ever, 25 February 2013 - 08:13 PM.

Check out https://www.facebook.com/LiquidGames for some great games made by me on the Playstation Mobile market.

#7 mikeman   Members   -  Reputation: 2176

Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:06 PM

Ok...I'm not gonna beat around the bush here...the soooner you accept, as a cold, hard, fact, that NOBODY is going to make a videogame for you or fund you when you don't have a relatively solid project, the better. Just get that notion out of your head, it's not a possibility. Yes, it's tragic that you have this condition that hinders your life, and I know, because I have mental disorders myself, namely OCD and depression(I'm just mentioning it to show you that you're not alone here). Many people here have this kind of problems. But not all is bleak: for example, you mentioned in your funding page that you have a job and make decent money out of it. That's very good. It's certainly better than what I am doing right now, which is getting paid for peanuts (but then, living in Greece and all, that is kinda expected right now, I should be grateful that I'm even amongst the elect few that have a job!) tongue.png

 

But the point is: If you can't learn how to make games yourself(that is, pick up a relative skill such as programming, level design or art and become proficient at it), you won't make games, period. It's just the way it is. So I suggest you get to it: start learning! On this age, you can find nearly infinite material about anything online, you can ask people to help you pick up the more fitting material, you can ask people to help you with all sorts of technical or conceptual problems you might have, and that's it. Anything else will lead absolutely nowhere. And realize this will likely take years and lots, lots of patience. If patience doesn't come naturally, force yourself. If you don't have patience, ability to learn and perseverance, you won't be able to manage a team(which is tremendously hard, and definately not akin to sit and tell the tech people what cool stuff to put on the game) in order to make a quality game anyway, so you're back to square one. It simply can't be done any other way. Just can't. There's no Royal Road to game development, to paraphrase Euclid a bit here. 

 

To reiterate: If you don't make your dream game, nobody will.


Edited by mikeman, 25 February 2013 - 10:27 PM.


#8 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3520

Posted 25 February 2013 - 10:57 PM

No one cares that you have Asperger's. Not in any meaningful way for what you're trying to do, anyway.

 

Ideas are basically worthless. Ideas are only worth anything if they are successfully implemented.

 

You need to prove that you can do something with your ideas before anyone invests money or time in them.

 

You are trying to skip a few steps. You need to learn some useful skills and have something that proves that before you can solicit support for your own projects from other people.


-Mark the Artist

Digital Art and Technical Design
Developer Journal


#9 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17247

Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:00 AM

Noah: no one has put you down or told you that you can't succeed because of your asperger's.

They've given you the exact same advice that everyone else -- with OR without disabilities -- is given when they come to this community with huge ideas: your goals are unrealistic, and you need to put in the time and effort to learn a useful skill.


You CAN do this. Other people with similar conditions or other difficulties succeed with game development all the time.

The reason you still haven't succeeded isn't that you have asperger's syndrome, it's because you're using your condition as an excuse and not really trying.
Stop expecting people to just do things FOR you and let us help you -- through advice, help, resources, etc. -- to actually do something for yourself.


Forget about trying to raise money. You don't need it yet, because you should be starting with much smaller, more easily achievable projects.
Forget about trying to recruit others, because you should be spending the time to learn a useful skill BEFORE you'll be ready to work with others.
Forget about constantly explaining about your asperger's syndrome, because it isn't the thing that's holding you back.


Stop using your asperger's as an excuse, and actually get something done, just like everyone else does whether they face difficulties or not.


You CAN make games if you put in the time and effort, and we live in a time where there are support, resources and technology available make it easier than ever to succeed. However, you will NEVER make games if you continue to pursue unrealistic goals, seek funding, and pretend that your asperger's is the thing holding you back.


Stop feeling sorry for yourself and go learn to make some games already!  I see 13 different topics in your profile history, but only a single one where you even asked for advice on learning how to program -- which you seemed to give up on within the very same topic.  There's nothing wrong with sharing ideas, but it won't get your games made.  You also keep asking for funding, but it just isn't going to happen while you have nothing other than an idea -- you need to spend the time to develop those basic skills, and you need to attempt some smaller more reasonable projects.

(Posted from mobile.)



#10 SymLinked   Members   -  Reputation: 816

Posted 26 February 2013 - 01:30 PM

Noah, I think it's really sad that you claim people judge you because of your aspergers when no one had any idea that you had aspergers until you told them so. So basically you're trying to gain an advantage because of your mental state, not because someone treated you unfairly.



#11 Mastermind89   Members   -  Reputation: 126

Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:01 PM

@ranakor: Thanks I will look into Unity's Digital Tutors.

 

@SymLinked: I also think it's sad that no one is willing to lend a helping hand. Although the people who posted in this topic gave me some advice.

 

@jbadams : So they gave me advice all along? I guess I was just too ignorant at the time. I'm going to put in time and effort. Wish me luck.

 

@Everyone else: I understand the concerns and hints of advice. I guess I just wanted a head start in life. Looks like I'll just have to give making games a try.


Edited by Mastermind89, 26 February 2013 - 04:04 PM.


#12 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17247

Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:31 PM

@jbadams : So they gave me advice all along?

They really did, and not once has anyone (other than you) suggested that asperger's should hold you back!  You've been given the same type of advice that others with similar goals and project ideas are given, and you have exactly the same opportunity as those other people to follow that advice and make some great games.

 

The following is a selection of advice quoted from your previous topics, with emphasis added:

 

 

My advice is to start with a much simpler project. I think you need to set more realistic goals and focus on completing smaller projects if you want to accomplish your goal of becoming a game developer. I took the liberty of looking at some of your past posts and I can see a pattern of starting ambitious projects only to get distracted and try something else. You need to pick a technology, a small project, and work that project to completion.
 
The Sims is a very complex game that took many many people to produce and a high budget. I am not saying that you will never be able to produce a game like that in the future, but right now you do not have the resources or skills to be able to produce that game successfully without frustrating yourself a great deal.
 
[...]
 

You're asking for funding to develop a game. Investment requires scrutiny, if not a full technical analysis. You have shown a lack of understanding of copyright, and a lack of understanding your own limitations. Both of these things would threaten every dollar you get to develop a commercial product. These aren't permanent gamebreakers; these are obstacles that you can work through.
 
Work with your own limitations. Embrace them. Don't give up, but you have to work with them, and understand what you can and can't do. An MMO, for example, is out of your league. Infringing IP is also way out of the question.
 
[...]
 
 

Sharing lots of game ideas constantly is not how games get made.
 
Games get made when a team or individual focus on one idea*, and continue to work at it until it's done. If you have some difficulty that makes it harder for you to stick with and complete a project then you need to find a way of dealing with that and proceeding with your project; it is not the responsibility of others to deal with your problems, and while most people will be sympathetic with your situation, in the real world people won't just jump on board and do things for you because of your difficulty. They're working with their own difficulties -- aspergers and other disorders, health problems, financial problems, and more -- as well, and they have their own ideas they would like to work on as well. They're not "greedy jerks" because of that -- some people are of course, but for the most part everyone else is just busy dealing with their own problems and trying to reach their own goals -- you're not a greedy jerk for not helping all of them!
 
[...]
 
 
You can succeed, but you need to focus, and apply yourself fully, and you need to do it -- you can't expect other people to do it for you. You can do it! Get out there and don't stop trying till it's done! :)
 
 

I'm going to put in time and effort. Wish me luck.

Excellent!  I wish you all the luck in the world!
 
Start off from the basics like everyone else, spend the time to properly learn how to create games, and you absolutely can succeed!  We're here to help, so don't be afraid to ask. smile.png cool.png


#13 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17247

Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:32 PM

Damnit, the editor mangled those quotes... they're supposed to be separate quotes rather than all combined, but I think you should still be able to follow the point of the post.



#14 kseh   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1834

Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:46 PM

Just to put this out there (and I say this hoping that it is helpful), development of a large scale computer game likely involves skills that would be very difficult to learn. However maybe producing a board or card game is something you can do with the skills you already have and still be a significant accomplishment. Competition would still be fierce, that's what makes it a major accomplishment.

Or if you have a story to tell, write a book. Become a writer or how about an artist? Again, it's no small matter to do these things well but you probably have the fundamental skills to begin.

#15 FLeBlanc   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3081

Posted 26 February 2013 - 05:06 PM

Wow. Just... wow.



#16 way2lazy2care   Members   -  Reputation: 782

Posted 26 February 2013 - 06:13 PM

Damnit, the editor mangled those quotes... they're supposed to be separate quotes rather than all combined, but I think you should still be able to follow the point of the post.

HAHA SOMEONE FROM THE STAFF ACKNOWLEDGES IT!

 

The new editor is great except that it really mangles some more complex quotes :(

 

/off-topic



#17 jbadams   Senior Staff   -  Reputation: 17247

Posted 26 February 2013 - 06:57 PM

HAHA SOMEONE FROM THE STAFF ACKNOWLEDGES IT!

We know it's terrible, and we really are trying to fix it. Unfortunately they designed the software in such a way that a lot of the other functionality assumes the standard editor is present, so it's a non-trivial job to replace it with something more suitable. We know it's a problem, and we will get it solved -- unfortunately it's just taking some time. smile.png



#18 game of thought   Members   -  Reputation: 212

Posted 28 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

as somebody with a similar problem to you, i think that aspergers is no excuse to go on about outlandish projects. I imagine that many people here have it(no offense intended since i have it to), and they don't do these things. In the beginning, i talked about big projects(like things like mario etc) , but not on forums. I eventually realized that one has to work , none of this 'i can't make them by myself'' mentality as this is wrong. Sure, it is hard in the beginning, but once you have struggled for a year in c++ and finally moved onto Python with all the things you have learned it takes less than a week(of intense concentration). Aspergers does not hinder learning, for me it enhances it. I think that people should be judged as people, regardless. Hitler and Mussolini may have had major mental disorders, but does that stop you from judging them?

 

plus, i think leading a guilt trip on especially these forums is a very stupid idea.

I will give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you aren't lying


Edited by game of thought, 28 February 2013 - 02:18 PM.


#19 CC Ricers   Members   -  Reputation: 623

Posted 02 March 2013 - 03:56 PM

There's a user on YouTube with autism, and with his own quirks and phobias. He has some particularly unique an interesting ideas for making games, and guess what, he's programming them on his own. The idea would be ridiculous if done on a very specialized 3D engine, but he's making it in 2D so it is manageable for him. His level of obsession with certain things becomes an ironic strength in that it keeps him determined to finish them. As others have said, you should focus on where your strengths are, not complain about your weaknesses.

 

We do not have a prejudice or bias against disabilities - what we do have generally is a bias against overly ambitious ideas where there is no apparent level of skill to complement it. When someone comes up with no concrete plans or prototypes and announces a sandbox game on the scale of AAA games, or somewhat similar in complexity, I believe they should be asked, do you enjoy building large things or just the feeling of having something large and ambitious right in front of you? Do you want to develop games because it's something you enjoy, or because you want respect / e-cred / whatever? It's all right to have some mixture of both, but it's more important that enjoyability comes first.


My development blog: Electronic Meteor

#20 Tournicoti   Prime Members   -  Reputation: 682

Posted 04 March 2013 - 06:05 PM

Please don't use Asperger as an excuse, it's too much easy, unfair. And people (Asperger or not) just don't care. Everybody has his own problems, you know. But if you need help, ask help, don't flood people with every unelaborated idea you have. Here is what for, ask and get help. Being Asperger doesn't mean you can do whatever you want and then ask for excuses. Please take it easy

Good luck smile.png


Edited by Tournicoti, 05 March 2013 - 02:03 PM.





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