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'averaging out' the colour of a texture?


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#1 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1227

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 08:02 AM

Hi everyone,

 

I'm working with this water texture:

 

waterMain_zpsb30f2c7c.png

 

However, it doesn't look great when I tile it in-game, because of the fact that it has light and dark colour highlights across it, which are quite clearly visible when tiled.

 

Does anyone know how I could remove those light and dark differences and average out the blue colour, using GIMP or paint.net?

 

Thanks!



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#2 eppo   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2466

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 08:11 AM

You can use GIMP's tone curve editor to cut off values above a certain threshold.

 

Because the highlights make up all of the finer detail in the picture, simply blurring and then darkening it slightly should also work.



#3 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4420

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 08:15 AM

What you're looking for its called a high and low pass filter I think. Though I don't know where to find one. High pass filter should cut the dark areas, low pass filter should cut the brighter areas.


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#4 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3628

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 05:45 PM

First thing, I would try making it grayscale to isolate the tonal differences without having to worry about color values, and use those filters and mess with the histogram. You can then go back and colorize is back to blue fairly trivially.

 

I would offer more specific advice but my laptop is waiting on a new AC adapter so I can't really experiment...


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#5 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 05:48 PM

http://blog.patdavid.net/2012/06/getting-around-in-gimp-color-curves.html

#6 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1227

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 01:02 PM

Thanks for the help! I haven't had a chance to try any of these yet, but I'll get on it!



#7 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3628

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 06:05 PM

Here's what I got by converting to gray scale and evening out that section of pixel values (make all pixel values between value A and value B the same). And then going back and "colorizing" it back to blue. Not perfect, but shows you what you can do:

 

Watertexture.png


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#8 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 09:10 PM

Prinz Eugn, that's just the hard way of using the curves tool I posted about above.

#9 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3628

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 09:36 PM

Prinz Eugn, that's just the hard way of using the curves tool I posted about above.

 

I don't think so, since the dark values and light values are also different hues, meaning you'll have to adjust each channel's histogram in order to get even color. Making it grayscale just removes that part of the equation so you're only dealing with absolute value, not juggling value and hue.


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#10 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 10:06 PM


Prinz Eugn, that's just the hard way of using the curves tool I posted about above.

 
I don't think so, since the dark values and light values are also different hues, meaning you'll have to adjust each channel's histogram in order to get even color. Making it grayscale just removes that part of the equation so you're only dealing with absolute value, not juggling value and hue.


You just move the curve into a straight line on 'value mode'. Then you can adjust the rest by eye if you want to go deeper.

#11 Prinz Eugn   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3628

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 02:42 AM

What software are you using? I'm using Photoshop, but I think GIMP would be the same. Manipulating the values will still you give you obvious differences of color when tiled, since the dark spots also have a different hue (as well as brightness value) from the other parts of the image.


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#12 george7378   Members   -  Reputation: 1227

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 05:37 AM

Thanks Prinz Eugn - that's exactly what I was looking for. I did try it myself, but I couldn't get anything reasonable. I converted it to graysale in GIMP and then messed around with the curves and levels for a bit - I couldn't get an even colour. Would you mind telling me what tools you used? Thanks!



#13 MrDaaark   Members   -  Reputation: 3555

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:46 AM

What software are you using? I'm using Photoshop, but I think GIMP would be the same. Manipulating the values will still you give you obvious differences of color when tiled, since the dark spots also have a different hue (as well as brightness value) from the other parts of the image.

I'm using GIMP in this case, because Photoshop Elements 8 doesn't have a curves editor unfortunately. It's one of the few reasons I bother to even install GIMP.

When the curve editor is open, I use the color sampler / needle tool to click on the dark spot in the image, and that shows me where it is on the curve. Then I just move that point up or down until I even everything out.

There are many ways to go about this.

#14 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30432

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 07:12 AM

In the interest of more options (using photoshop):

 

Put the image on the base layer.

Duplicate it and blur it heavily.

Set the blurred copy to the colour blend mode.

hBV5YSj.png

 

 


Put the image on the base layer.

Duplicate it and use the high-pass filter. Increase the radius until all the detail you want to capture is visible, but not the large splotches of colour.

Set the blend mode to of this new layer to 'overlay'.

Duplicate this overlay layer. Invert the original (lower) one.

Add a "Levels" adjustment layer in between the two overlay layers. Move the darks/lights/midtones around until you get the balance that you're after.

ppKoPQZ.png



#15 DavidWolfire   Members   -  Reputation: 184

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 01:03 PM

Yeah, high-pass filter does exactly what OP is looking for -- preserving high frequency details while removing low-frequency color variations. Here is how it looks if you combine the high-pass details with the average color of the original texture:

 

waterhighpass.png

 

Tiled four times:

 

waterhighpasstiled.png






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