Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Recovering lost skills


Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.

  • You cannot reply to this topic
13 replies to this topic

#1 Triad_prague   Members   -  Reputation: 140

Posted 27 February 2013 - 12:34 AM

Hi all, I used to be a game programmer. But two years ago life forced me to walk its hard way. My pc was blasted, I was poor as fuck and I had to work for money. So I quit programming.

Two years has passed, I have enough money to get a decent laptop. In fact I just bought one. Yesterday I turned on my laptop, got myself a cup of coffee, relaxed my hands on the keyboard. I fired up VS2010. Ready to rock. But then I just stared blank at the LED screen. I felt so weird. I seemed to have forgotten all my coding skills. I just couldn't get in touch anymore with the beautiful IDE. What's wrong with me?

Anyone ever felt the same? what should I do to get my game programming skill back? all my reference was hardcopies. And they've rotten in the warehouse :(
the hardest part is the beginning...

Sponsor:

#2 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19766

Posted 27 February 2013 - 01:09 AM

If you've really lost how to develop, perhaps a refresher of the basics.

Implement a linked list container. Implement a generic sorting algorithm. Implement the FogBuzz problem. Etc.

These are simple problems that should get your brain back into a programming mentality.
Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#3 szecs   Members   -  Reputation: 2102

Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:42 AM

Um... did you try to do something without an idea what to make? (WHAT and not HOW)



#4 Triad_prague   Members   -  Reputation: 140

Posted 28 February 2013 - 05:01 AM

thx for all the suggestions, seems I just need to warm up again with some simple projects. I kinda get the hang of this now. Btw what is the up to date library that people use for handling input, windowing, setting up opengl? I used sdl back then. I heard its development was stopped in some way.
the hardest part is the beginning...

#5 Sik_the_hedgehog   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1546

Posted 28 February 2013 - 07:50 AM

SDL 1.2 is dead, SDL 2.0 is in fully active development. Beware that it isn't compatible, though, so if you check tutorials and such make sure to check for which version are they. Nowhere near as big of a change as was with Allegro however...


Edited by Sik_the_hedgehog, 28 February 2013 - 07:51 AM.

Don't pay much attention to "the hedgehog" in my nick, it's just because "Sik" was already taken =/ By the way, Sik is pronounced like seek, not like sick.

#6 ysg   Members   -  Reputation: 192

Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:13 PM

If you've really lost how to develop, perhaps a refresher of the basics.

Implement a linked list container. Implement a generic sorting algorithm. Implement the FogBuzz problem. Etc.

These are simple problems that should get your brain back into a programming mentality.

What's FogBuzz?



#7 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19766

Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:59 PM

If you've really lost how to develop, perhaps a refresher of the basics.

Implement a linked list container. Implement a generic sorting algorithm. Implement the FogBuzz problem. Etc.

These are simple problems that should get your brain back into a programming mentality.

What's FogBuzz?

Sorry, I had two things on my brain at the time I typed it up.  FogBugz is a software company started by Joel Spolsky, who ran a regular column of things that included programmer tests and notes on being a great programmer, finding good companies, etc.  It was called "Joel On Software", and was a great column.

 

The problem is actually FizzBuzz:

 

Write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100. But for multiples of three print "Fizz" instead of the number and for the multiples of five print "Buzz". For numbers which are multiples of both three and five print "FizzBuzz".

 

For those who are tempted to write the solution and post it, please don't post your solutions.

 

Some people can write out a correct solution in 5-10 lines of code.  Other people struggle with this problem for hours.  It is a good exercise.


Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#8 ranakor   Members   -  Reputation: 439

Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:04 PM

Due to the unreadability i don't think this will spoil it to anyone who can't write it :

 

<3 LINQPad

 

Enumerable.Range(1,99).Select(i=> (i%3 == 0 || i%5 == 0) ? ((i%3 == 0 && i%5 == 0 ) ? "fogbuzz" : ((i%3 == 0) ? "fog" : "buzz")) : i.ToString()).Dump()



#9 alnite   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 2061

Posted 01 March 2013 - 08:49 PM

For those who are tempted to write the solution and post it, please don't post your solutions.

 

Due to the unreadability i don't think this will spoil it to anyone who can't write it :


<3 LINQPad

Enumerable.Range(1,99).Select(i=> (i%3 == 0 || i%5 == 0) ? ((i%3 == 0 && i%5 == 0 ) ? "fogbuzz" : ((i%3 == 0) ? "fog" : "buzz")) : i.ToString()).Dump()

 

Lol.



#10 ysg   Members   -  Reputation: 192

Posted 05 March 2013 - 08:54 AM

 

If you've really lost how to develop, perhaps a refresher of the basics.

Implement a linked list container. Implement a generic sorting algorithm. Implement the FogBuzz problem. Etc.

These are simple problems that should get your brain back into a programming mentality.

What's FogBuzz?

Sorry, I had two things on my brain at the time I typed it up.  FogBugz is a software company started by Joel Spolsky, who ran a regular column of things that included programmer tests and notes on being a great programmer, finding good companies, etc.  It was called "Joel On Software", and was a great column.

 

The problem is actually FizzBuzz:

 

Write a program that prints the numbers from 1 to 100. But for multiples of three print "Fizz" instead of the number and for the multiples of five print "Buzz". For numbers which are multiples of both three and five print "FizzBuzz".

 

For those who are tempted to write the solution and post it, please don't post your solutions.

 

Some people can write out a correct solution in 5-10 lines of code.  Other people struggle with this problem for hours.  It is a good exercise.

Cool, thanks.  Sounds like a fun assignment for me to solve in Lisp :) .



#11 Krohm   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3016

Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:43 AM

I see you had an hard time. Welcome back dude. I wish you the best!



#12 slicer4ever   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 3399

Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:06 PM

Due to the unreadability i don't think this will spoil it to anyone who can't write it :

 

<3 LINQPad

 

Enumerable.Range(1,99).Select(i=> (i%3 == 0 || i%5 == 0) ? ((i%3 == 0 && i%5 == 0 ) ? "fogbuzz" : ((i%3 == 0) ? "fog" : "buzz")) : i.ToString()).Dump()

I think you underestimate the legibility of that code.  although it is a very nice one-line for the solution.

 

also, that problem just seems to be an exercise in understanding the mod operation, I think any programmer who understands it's use would understand how to write a trivial solution.


Edited by slicer4ever, 07 March 2013 - 04:59 AM.

Check out https://www.facebook.com/LiquidGames for some great games made by me on the Playstation Mobile market.

#13 frob   Moderators   -  Reputation: 19766

Posted 06 March 2013 - 12:17 PM

that problem just seems to be an exercise in understanding the mod operation, I think any programmer who understands it's use would understand how to write a trivial solution.

Seemingly so, yes.

However in the hundreds of places it has been posted online and the thousands of responses by people who cannot resist posting their solution attempts, it has shown to be much more difficult in practice than it seems at first glance.

It is surprisingly easy to get your solution wrong on the first attempt.
Check out my personal indie blog at bryanwagstaff.com.

#14 ranakor   Members   -  Reputation: 439

Posted 07 March 2013 - 04:47 AM

It's a bit of a specific problem as i can see it being obvious to game programmers but many other programming fields deal surprising little with any form of operations on numbers, even the most trivial ones (most LoB apps for exemple).

I'm fairly sure if i asked my previous coworkers some of them wouldn't even know about the % operator.






Old topic!
Guest, the last post of this topic is over 60 days old and at this point you may not reply in this topic. If you wish to continue this conversation start a new topic.



PARTNERS