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OpenGL Programming Guide 4.3


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#1 Overman   Members   -  Reputation: 369

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 03:43 PM

I am still learning OpenGL and I have been looking around the web for various resources. The online resources I have encountered seem few and far between, as well as out of date. A lot of so called tutorials provide code without explanation, which is not much help in the learning process.

 

Therefore, I decided recently that purchasing a book would probably be the most thorough way to learn OpenGL. I would prefer to learn the most recent version, so I was considering the book: OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide to Learning OpenGL, Version 4.3 (8th Edition).

 

This book does not come out until April 1st, but I was wondering, aside from the reviews on Amazon (not very helpful), if someone could give me some insight into the previous editions, and whether or not they think this will be a good purchase for a beginner.

 

In a sense, is this worth the money?

If not, are there any alternatives that still cover the latest version of OpenGL from the ground up?



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#2 EddieV223   Members   -  Reputation: 1406

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:06 PM

It could be a good one, its a complete rewrite.  The last one wasn't so good but the ones before it were good.  I am patiently waiting for it, and will buy it if its good.  It was originally due in august of last year, but as you can see it's fallen behind.

 

There is also the openGL bible 6th edition with a release date a few months later.  It could also be good.  http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0321902947/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0321902947&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 

One thing to note is that the first book covers 4.3.  Nvidia only has a beta driver with 4.3 support and amd has nothing yet.  Both will support it eventually though.  The second claims 4.0+.  This maybe why the first book has been delayed.

 

In the mean time there are some very good tutorials for modern openGL 3.3+ on the net.  Below are some of the best.

 

http://www.opengl-tutorial.org/

 

http://www.arcsynthesis.org/gltut/index.html

 

http://open.gl/introduction


Edited by EddieV223, 01 March 2013 - 07:22 PM.

If this post or signature was helpful and/or constructive please give rep.

 

// C++ Video tutorials

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo60USYV9Ik

 

// Easy to learn 2D Game Library c++

SFML2.1 Download http://www.sfml-dev.org/download.php

SFML2.1 Tutorials http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/2.1/

 

// SFML 2 book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1849696845/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1849696845&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 


#3 TheChubu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 4062

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:14 PM

I'd say that unless there is a distinctive way to deal with things from OGL 3 (core) to OGL 4, I'd use all the resources available for learning OGL 3. By the time you're done with that you'll probably know what you want from OGL 4 without reading tutorials.


"I AM ZE EMPRAH OPENGL 3.3 THE CORE, I DEMAND FROM THEE ZE SHADERZ AND MATRIXEZ"

 

My journals: dustArtemis ECS framework and Making a Terrain Generator


#4 mhagain   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7802

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:22 PM

NVIDIA's driver has actually been out of beta for quite some time now - it's a proper full driver (you won't find that on their developer site, but the regular drivers you can download from them are full GL4.3).  AMD have unfortunately yet to deliver, and until they do I'd support the recommendation to focus more on GL3.x.


It appears that the gentleman thought C++ was extremely difficult and he was overjoyed that the machine was absorbing it; he understood that good C++ is difficult but the best C++ is well-nigh unintelligible.


#5 EddieV223   Members   -  Reputation: 1406

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:31 PM

NVIDIA's driver has actually been out of beta for quite some time now - it's a proper full driver (you won't find that on their developer site, but the regular drivers you can download from them are full GL4.3).  AMD have unfortunately yet to deliver, and until they do I'd support the recommendation to focus more on GL3.x.

Oh really?  That's great I have AMD so I don't know about the green team, I was going off the information on this page.

https://developer.nvidia.com/opengl-driver

 

AMD has said that their driver is under development and they said that quite a while ago, like early 4th quarter of last year.  Shouldn't be much longer now.

 

However both do support 4.2 . 

 

A good place to start is openGL 3.3 since it can be supported on dx10 hardware.  


If this post or signature was helpful and/or constructive please give rep.

 

// C++ Video tutorials

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wo60USYV9Ik

 

// Easy to learn 2D Game Library c++

SFML2.1 Download http://www.sfml-dev.org/download.php

SFML2.1 Tutorials http://www.sfml-dev.org/tutorials/2.1/

 

// SFML 2 book

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1849696845/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1849696845&linkCode=as2&tag=gamer2creator-20

 


#6 phantom   Moderators   -  Reputation: 7014

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 07:31 PM

AMD have GL4.2 support, so while some 4.3 functionality is currently missing there is no reason to only focus on 3.x...

#7 maxgpgpu   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 279

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Posted 01 March 2013 - 09:09 PM

I'm not sure why, but almost everyone ignores the OpenGL and GLSL specifications, which are free, downloadable PDF files on the www.opengl.org website.

 

Yes, they are not printed books.  Yes, they don't have boatloads of drawings and figures and pretty color photos.  However, they are VASTLY more helpful than the term "specifications" implies.  So the very first thing you should do is download, print-if-you-prefer, then read all the way through those documents.  They really are great.

 

As for "regular books", the OpenGL SuperBible has been the best OpenGL-specific book for several years.  And probably the best book that isn't OpenGL-specific is "Real Time Rendering".

 

These days, to do a great job, you almost need to have all these resources available:

  - the specifications
  - the best 2 or 3 OpenGL-specific books

  - the best 3 to 8 other 3D graphics books

  - the best 100~200 PDF files you can find on the internet

 

In my opinion, the official OpenGL books were never near the top of the list of "bests".  However, if they issue a full rewrite and it fully covers v4.30 (not just an addendum of newly added features), then it might be the first "real winner" from that series.



#8 Overman   Members   -  Reputation: 369

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 12:14 AM

Thank you so much for the responses. I had heard that the previous version of this book was not super helpful and was mostly a slight adjustment to the prior edition. Here's hoping this edition is better.

 

Also, regarding the specification document. I have looked into it, but it is less a guide of how to use OpenGL and really more of a description of what the new version does. What I'm really looking for is a complete beginners guide of OpenGL with the most modern version. With regards to the version, my thought process is that by the time I ever get something worthwhile accomplished with OpenGL, version 4.3 will be a lot more common than it is now.






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