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dilema about education abrod


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#1 Mattspr   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 02:50 PM

Hi, I'm 20 and live in Russia. That year I will go to study graphic design here (in Russia). I want to work in game industry: technical artist, 3d modeling and other like that. I will study graphic design here because it is only thing here that I can afford for now. So I have some questions:

1)how does specialization called that related to 3d modelling(making characters,  landscapes, some basic programming, rigging etc.)?

2)the main problem is money. It is imposible for me to get such money, to get bachelor degree in Canada or USA(I want to study exactly there), every thing I saw is from 10 000 for semester and higher(only for tuting). SO question is: may be there is some cheaper oportunities? PS I need a full-time program

3) are there some post-graduate degrees, relatet to gameDev, that i can get with me graphic design bachelor?

PS thank for reading that mess :)

 



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#2 unit187   Members   -  Reputation: 274

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 03:21 AM

Привет! :)

 

This specialization is called CG - computer graphics, I believe. But I doubt you can get bachelor degree in something like that. There are some 1-2 year courses though. I have heard of 'Vancouver film school' or something like that, they teach VFX related stuff, like modelling and animation. I've seen a number of demo-reels from people who have finished such courses, and honestly, most of them are bad.

 

Only demo-reels from people who have studied with Animation Mentors are good. Those guys rock.

 

AIn my opinion - these courses do not worth time and effort. It is just a ripoff. You will spend thousands of dollars on the courses themselves, and thousands to pay for rent, food etc.

The Internet is full of high quality video tutorials on modelling, sculpting, rigging, VFX, compositing, matte painting, color correction, DSLR video shooting... Basically, anything you might want as CG artist. They will often teach you whatever exactly you want.

You can check video tutorials from companies like cmiVFX, gnomon, digital-tutors, 3d-buzz, lynda.com and so on.

 

Besides serious programming, nothing in CG requires formal education. You only need to have a passion for something and be ready to spend a lot of time studying this something.



#3 DaveTroyer   Members   -  Reputation: 1052

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 04:58 AM

Hi!

 

I don't necessarily agree with everything unit187 has written, but he does bring up a some good points. A degree can be very expensive, especially when you want to be so specialized in the field. I don't agree that the degree is not worth the time and effort, but that really comes down to you and your decision.

 

Are you a strong enough artist in 3D and vector work to get the job above others with a degree? I worked as a technical illustrator for a few years, and it takes some practice to get to an on demand standard. If you're looking for a full time position some place in the US or Canada, you'll need to have a really strong portfolio with a degree and a super awesome portfolio without.

 

So with that information along with free online learning resources (that you won't get a degree from), you have to ask yourself if you're realistically on the same level as others in your field. Are you better than others that may be fighting for the same position? 

 

Also, maybe you're looking for a position as a 3D generalist. This is someone who creates various 3D assets for the game that may or may not be largely significant, like toys on a shelf, bathroom fixtures, or debris that litters the streets. Its not a glam job, but its definitely needed in the game development industry.

 

Anyway, best of luck to you in whichever path you chose!

-Dave


Check out my game blog - Dave's Game Blog


#4 Mattspr   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:52 AM

Thank you both. Right now I got no portfolio at all, I just study from digital tutors)) so I dont know if I will have awesome portfolio after some years of practice and self education or not, but I think to be a great specialist in some field there must be some university degree especialy in our time. 



#5 unit187   Members   -  Reputation: 274

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:12 PM

I don't agree that the degree is not worth the time and effort

Fair enough. I try to view college education in terms of how much knowledge can you get there which you can't really get without formal education. In most cases when it comes to CG (not talking about programming though, it is totally different thing) you won't learn much in college.

But on other hand, a degree really helps in getting your first job. Untill you manage to make outstanding portfolio, your degree might be your best friend.



#6 Mattspr   Members   -  Reputation: 110

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 12:22 PM

))

so still some qustions, is it ordinary cost of education in canada and usa? or there is some colledges or ways with chiper education? 



#7 Hamsta   Members   -  Reputation: 943

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 04:21 PM

Community Colleges are usually cheaper than private art schools or public universities, even when looking at the higher international student fees.

Where you choose to go makes a big difference too. Everything will be more expensive in California or New York, but you will have a harder time networking with professionals in the field which can hurt you when you are job hunting (which I assume is one of the reasons you want to study in North America.)


Itamar Reiner: Self Financed Concept Artist http://www.hamsta180.com

#8 Woland   Members   -  Reputation: 372

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 05:44 AM

It is entirely possible to get a job in gamedev without a degree. One of the best 3D artists I know has some business degree and never studied art. He just learned 3D max and zbrush himself. A while ago I read about a guy from Russia that just learned to sculpt in zbrush on his own, published his spaceships online and guess what... Blizzard offered him a job.

 

If you don't have the money to study abroad, don't. There are other ways to get knowledge. I am not saying that you are one of them, but people tend to think that getting a degree in some field will get them a job in the field. In majority of cases, they just lack initiative to learn on their own and the degree itself will only give them a skill level somewhere between basic and average. No university or degree in the world will make them great without their own effort.

 

In your situation and at your age, I would strongly advise you to try learning by yourself. Even if you start the 3D studies, you will end up learning on your own most of the time anyway. Networking can be done in so many different ways - you don't need to live in California to be a game developer.


Want to learn more about the industry? 

 

games making noob

 

gamedev newbie's peek inside.


#9 DaveTroyer   Members   -  Reputation: 1052

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Posted 06 March 2013 - 03:02 PM

No university or degree in the world will make them great without their own effort.

 

So very true! biggrin.png I love this quote!

 

But as for all the talk of "degree vs. no-degree", I just think a degree can help to show employers that one is willing to put in the time and effort to see something through to the end. I worked as a technical illustrator for years before pursuing a higher education and if it weren't for the company doing major lay-offs, I probably never would have gone back to school and never would have discovered my passion for game development.

 

I completely agree that if one doesn't develop and cultivate their skills, then a degree will be nothing but useless paper, but if you have a strong portfolio and work your butt off, then having a degree on top of that just shows you have commitment to long term goals and maybe a more well rounded individual (granted, not always the case, but it might biggrin.png ).

 

Though, I've been impressed by some with amazing portfolios yet no formal education in the field. It all really depends on how good you are.


Check out my game blog - Dave's Game Blog





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