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Breaking in as a non-american


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#1 bollµ   Members   -  Reputation: 354

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 07:43 AM

Hi all!

 

I've always wanted to work in the games industry, and I've been learning quite a few things related to programming, game design and picking up C++ for around four years now. 

 

As a non-american student, after completing my Bachelor's in Computer Science (which is the degree that I want to take up), how would I go about applying for a job at a game company as a programmer?

 

Most international game companies do not have branches in my country. So, how would I go about this? I do have a passport, but do not own a visa to the US / other countries.

 

Thanks all!

 


a WIP 2d game engine: https://code.google.com/p/modulusengine/

English is not my first language, so do feel free to correct me :)


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#2 PosthasteGames   Members   -  Reputation: 123

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:03 AM

I think your question is more about immigration and political stuff then business stuff.

As for the business: why on earth woud they deny recruiting foreigners? Thats just racism and discrimination smile.png

 

Dont worry about it, worry about the immigration first at least.


Edited by PosthasteGames, 08 March 2013 - 08:03 AM.

"Woud you rather make a game with a preliminary originality, or a game that shocks the people and maybe even politicians?" - Posthaste Games


#3 Hodgman   Moderators   -  Reputation: 30432

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 08:10 AM

First up, there's other destinations besides the US. From what I can tell, Europe, Canada, and Oceania are easier to get working Visas for than the US wink.png

 

Games companies often do hire from overseas because they're always on the lookout for talent, wherever that talent is. Generally you'll do some interviews over the phone or Skype, and then sometimes they'll do a final interview in person (if this is required, they'll likely pay for your flight there and back to do this).

 

If they want to hire you, they'll apply for your visa for you, as they'll likely be a "sponsor" of the visa.

In some countries this isn't even required though! e.g. in some European countries you can just fly there without a visa and then visit the town hall to register yourself as a foreign worker at a skilled company, and you'll be granted permission to work.

 

If they're a big enough company, they'll also pay your relocation costs to move you to their country, and likely give you a temporary apartment to stay in until you find your own. If they're a smaller company, they will want you to pay for all these expenses yourself.

 

That said, hiring people from overseas is very expensive and much harder than hiring locals... Companies aren't likely to go through all this trouble for a fresh graduate, as they can likely get graduates from a local university without going through all this trouble.

As always, make sure you're working on games projects outside of your university work, so that you're not "just another graduate", but have something that will show off your skills.

Also, if you can get some experience at a local company first, that will be a big help (again, so that you're not "just another graduate", but have some experience).


Edited by Hodgman, 08 March 2013 - 08:18 AM.





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