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How to Make High Resolution Graphics?


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#1 supesfan   Members   -  Reputation: 221

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 05:55 PM

Hello World,

 

I was wondering, how exaactly do they make the kind of graphics that they have now a days? I mean if you look at games like Crysis 2 and 3 (which are a head of there time if you as me) there graphics are superior to just about any game out there. Is it the amount of detail that you put into your 3d models and levels that determine the graphical quality, or does the game engine produce the graphical quality? I guess what I am trying to say is, if I wanted to put together a level with high resolution graphics on par with some of the professional games out there, how do I do that. I look at a lot of the 3d modeling tutorials out there and a lot of what they produce isn't bad, it's just not as good as what you see in triple AAA quality games. I am trying to produce a model of superman that I want to use in the UDK 3 engine, however I'm not sure how to make a high quality model? Can anybody point me in the right direction?

 



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#2 Bacterius   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 8165

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 06:25 PM

It's really both. They have good, high-poly models and high-resolution, well-designed textures, and they also know their way around shaders and tweak cool realistic effects until it looks good. From experience, you can't just put one model there, shade it, and expect it to look amazing. There's theory... and there's implementation, where you mess around with the graphical parameters until you get the right effect for your game.

 

Just like you can take a random photo outside, and it will look decently good, but you will probably want to post-process it in Photoshop, trying various options and filters until you get something that actually looks impressive.


The slowsort algorithm is a perfect illustration of the multiply and surrender paradigm, which is perhaps the single most important paradigm in the development of reluctant algorithms. The basic multiply and surrender strategy consists in replacing the problem at hand by two or more subproblems, each slightly simpler than the original, and continue multiplying subproblems and subsubproblems recursively in this fashion as long as possible. At some point the subproblems will all become so simple that their solution can no longer be postponed, and we will have to surrender. Experience shows that, in most cases, by the time this point is reached the total work will be substantially higher than what could have been wasted by a more direct approach.

 

- Pessimal Algorithms and Simplexity Analysis


#3 Tasche   Members   -  Reputation: 218

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 10:53 PM

yes... there's a reason these titles consume huge budgets



#4 Seabolt   Members   -  Reputation: 619

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 09:20 AM

There's a lot that goes into making a great model. I'm no artist, but I work with many, and this is how they produce their models.

They will design their mesh using Z-Brush or something equivalent to get an extremely high poly model that is essentially useless for video games. Then they will take that model and give it to a modeler to start reducing the poly count and make something close to it while still working. Then the next pass is texturing that model, then applying the features of that model, such as normal mapping, emissive mapping, specular mapping, what have you.

Then at the end, they will give the model to a tech artist or programmer to make sure they can make it look as good as possible, usually with things like anti-aliasing, post processing, dynamic lighting. 

It's a lot of hard work to fool people into thinking models look better than they actually are.


Perception is when one imagination clashes with another

#5 dpadam450   Members   -  Reputation: 842

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 11:54 PM

"I mean if you look at games like Crysis 2 and 3"
If you look at games like Crysis 2 and 3 on the PC............ is what you should have said. 360/PS3 don't even render 1080p.

In order of importance in my opinion: Higher texture resolutions, better lighting, more polygons, render resolution. Those have really been the main things for years that just keep getting better.



#6 supesfan   Members   -  Reputation: 221

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 09:38 AM

Ok, my programming skills aren't bad, just I am a total newb when it comes to making 3D models. 



#7 GeneralQuery   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 1263

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Posted 23 March 2013 - 09:53 AM

As others have noted, it's a combination of both. A fancy pants rendering engines will look bad if the artwork is of poor quality/craftsmanship and likewise an artist will have their hands tied if the engine is limited in terms of features. Saying that, I'd say that great artwork can save less-than-stellar graphics features but the reverse isn't really true. Bad programmer art looks bad regardless of cutting edge technology.



#8 french_hustler   Members   -  Reputation: 341

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 02:32 PM

Honestly, as a programmer, I tend to forget how crucial artists are.  I love graphics, but my artistic talent will never match what an artist could do.  Give me the Cry Engine and a team of programmers only and there is no way in hell we could pull off a scene that looks as good as any scene in the actual Crysis game. 

 

As programmers we deliver the tools, but the outcome of the product is artistic.  It is the art that looks good.  The tools we make as programmers are meant to allow the artistic team flush out what they invision in a convenient and flexible way while utilizing the hardware as efficiently as possible.  This bond between the 2 teams (programmers & artists) is tightly coupled.  As programmers, we wouldn't have good looking graphics, and without us, artists would have no way to express their visions.  It's a beautiful complement... especially when you, as the customer, get to immerse yourself in the art.  I'm currently playing Bioshock Infinity and the artistic immersion is truly mind boggling.

 

Also... I wish I had artist minions sad.png .  What I work hard to implement would be so much more satisfying if it looked good.






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