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Art skill worth mentioning?


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#1 JessieJess   Members   -  Reputation: 251

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 11:11 PM

Hi everyone,

 

I've been a bit of a lurker here and I wanted to get some advice as I'm a newbie trying to break into the industry. I'm currently more programming oriented in terms of skill set, but I do also have some artistic skill. However I'm unsure whether or not my art is really "worth mentioning" due to my actual background (and major) being in computer science.

 

Here are some example of sketches that I do. Critique is also always nice and appreciated. smile.png

[Link removed]

 

I think my big question here is: Is it even worth mentioning since I'll most likely be applying as a programmer? Would being a bit of an artist help me break into the industry?

 

-Jess


Edited by JessieJess, 04 June 2013 - 04:58 PM.


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#2 Tom Sloper   Moderators   -  Reputation: 10062

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Posted 12 March 2013 - 11:42 PM

I'll most likely be applying as a programmer? Would being a bit of an artist help me break into the industry?

 

No. You can put it on your portfolio site, but it won't help you get a programming job. Once you get hired, you can hang a few of your best sketches at your desk. Focus on the programming.


-- Tom Sloper
Sloperama Productions
Making games fun and getting them done.
www.sloperama.com

Please do not PM me. My email address is easy to find, but note that I do not give private advice.

#3 JessieJess   Members   -  Reputation: 251

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:07 AM

Thank you for the feedback. I'll avoid mentioning of it and probably remove from my portfolio of works.

I remember reading from your guide that artistic talent was a plus for getting into game-design. But since game design isn't exactly an entry level job, I was planning to break in as a programmer. I guess I should keep this to myself until I actually get the chance to get into design.


Edited by JessieJess, 13 March 2013 - 12:10 AM.


#4 TheSasquatch   Members   -  Reputation: 452

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:09 AM

Sounds perfect for a small and/or indie developer; someone with a shoestring budget who can't afford programmers and artists. Unfortunately, they won't be able to afford to pay very well, either--if at all--but at least you'll know it's because they genuinely don't have the cash, and not because the execs are paying themselves much, much more than they're worth.

 

Major corporate developers like EA, Activision, or Ubisoft probably won't be interested; creativity frightens them, unless you're suggesting a creative new way to screw their customers for a quick buck, in which case they'll just take credit for the idea themselves.

 

As for your art, you're willing to post samples and ask for critiicism, so you're doing better than most. If I had to make a suggestion, I'd say you should try adding color; it's hard to read pure black and white.



#5 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7793

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:41 AM

I think that art skills have some benefits, even in larger production. Better said, not only the art skills, but the knowledge of the according tools. You need often a bridge between the art department and programmer department, therefore you have the role of a technical artist, someone who knows both languages and helps to communicate between the teams.

But I think that the role is often given to an artist with technically background knowledge, someone who knows technically limitations, can code some shaders etc.

 

I fear, that concept art is not really helpful in this situation, but a good knowledge about the common art tools (PS, ZBrush, Maya/Max) and a solid background in art (color/light theory etc.) could be a plus.



#6 Ashaman73   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 7793

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:54 AM

Just found this job opportunity of a technical artist on gamasutra, maybe it gives you more insign of what is expected from this position.



#7 JessieJess   Members   -  Reputation: 251

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Posted 13 March 2013 - 01:07 AM

Thank you for the feedback, Sasquatch and Ashaman!

 

Sounds perfect for a small and/or indie developer; someone with a shoestring budget who can't afford programmers and artists. Unfortunately, they won't be able to afford to pay very well, either--if at all--but at least you'll know it's because they genuinely don't have the cash, and not because the execs are paying themselves much, much more than they're worth.

I'd definetly be fine with joining any indie project. I've done a couple small game projects myself, but I'd find the experience of working in a team invaluable, paid or not paid.

 

If I had to make a suggestion, I'd say you should try adding color; it's hard to read pure black and white.

Yes, I definetly need to post some of my color works. Sadly, a lot of my colored works are large canvas watercolor and pastel which don't lend themselves kindly to my very small scanner. :(

 

I fear, that concept art is not really helpful in this situation, but a good knowledge about the common art tools (PS, ZBrush, Maya/Max) and a solid background in art (color/light theory etc.) could be a plus.

Thanks for the advice! I'll definetly look into getting better acquainted with some common art tools. I had previously used PS for a while, but it'd be nice to also become fluent in other art tools. And also, thank you very much for the link. :)



#8 HardlineDigital   Members   -  Reputation: 255

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 10:42 AM

I think your employer is stupid if you have a skill that they ignore.

 

It is hard to balance your left and right brain out. There aren't many who bridge the gap and do both programming and art.

And that type of person can really be beneficial to a team.

Most of the people in HR departments wouldn't know anything about that though since they only do what they are told.

And from what I gather, they are told to seek highly specialized people with no knowledge of other fields.

 

Valve is one of the few companies that recognized multiple skills as a trait of value.


Edited by HardlineDigital, 27 March 2013 - 10:54 AM.


#9 robbiepxlbld   Members   -  Reputation: 137

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Posted 07 April 2013 - 12:22 PM

If I was an employer looking to hire a programmer, then I would see art skills as a bonus. Firstly, it would reassure me of your ability for cross-discipline communication, and secondly, could your art skills be used, even if in doodle form, to communicate your coding techniques in laymans terms across departments?

#10 rouncer   Members   -  Reputation: 291

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Posted 08 April 2013 - 11:42 PM

Some full colour works would be nice on your page, i see you have sketching down pat - if you want to finalize your artistic process, it should have a vibrant colour look to it.

bu te sketches are really nice.



#11 silkroadgame   Members   -  Reputation: 211

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 02:58 AM

Why to remove your works?Even though your skills are not helpful for your programmer career,they have no disadvantage for it too!What's more,I think your boss would think you are a talent in game design as you are skilled in a few field of game!

Not a bad thing indeed.


http://www.game-silkroad.com
info_game@silkroadcg.com


#12 L. Spiro   Crossbones+   -  Reputation: 13958

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Posted 15 April 2013 - 04:01 PM

Basically everyone is correct—you should realize that there is no single answer that fits all scenarios.

 

Your best bet is to put an applicable spin on it.  That is, if you can draw, say it helps when communicating with artists or when communicating your own ideas more visually.  If you also make music, say it helps you as a programmer to do sound programming.

 

My job is R&D, which sounds completely unrelated to art, but it means that I also work on or at least use the in-house tools we have developed for Maya, and it just so happened that my experience in Maya is quite helpful for me in this job.  So you never really know the worth of those extra little things you can do.

 

As mentioned, smaller studios will appreciate that more, but even for larger studios it wouldn’t hurt to make a very short mention of it in the “Miscellaneous” section of your résumé, and put a relevant spin on it.

 

 

Good luck!

 

 

L. Spiro


It is amazing how often people try to be unique, and yet they are always trying to make others be like them. - L. Spiro 2011
I spent most of my life learning the courage it takes to go out and get what I want. Now that I have it, I am not sure exactly what it is that I want. - L. Spiro 2013
I went to my local Subway once to find some guy yelling at the staff. When someone finally came to take my order and asked, “May I help you?”, I replied, “Yeah, I’ll have one asshole to go.”
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#13 dpadam450   Members   -  Reputation: 932

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 09:29 PM

They are worth mentioning if they are good/impressive. In other words do you feel like you could ever make money in selling your art or have enough knowledge to teach someone else good art skills. Looking at your portfolio I would say no. You don't have enough to have someone say "wow they are really dedicated at their interests." You have a very early skilled portfolio, should you push it further then yes. But showing 10 of the same style anime characters really boils down to "1" piece of art in my opinion. Basically the same piece in different ways.






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